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Will firing make imperfections more or less noticeable?


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#1 futurebird

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:57 AM

I'm making unglazed-ware-- specifically yixing teapots. I won't get to fire them for a very long time. Which is fine, I nee to practice.

But I wonder what firing will do.

How will it change burnishing?

Posted Image

Is burnishing worth it?

Will it tone down imperfections or heighten them?

My goal here is *perfection* for it to look almost machine-made. I'm always looking for way to improve symmetry and smoothness.

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#2 TJR

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 08:12 AM

Futurebird;
Yixing teapots are burnished and are unglazed. Purchase or make some terra sigilatta.[look it up].Brush it on the leather hard pot. Burnish with a spoon or a stone.
Then you will smooth out some imperfections.
TJR.

#3 OffCenter

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 08:17 AM

I'm making unglazed-ware-- specifically yixing teapots. I won't get to fire them for a very long time. Which is fine, I nee to practice.

But I wonder what firing will do.

How will it change burnishing?

Posted Image

Is burnishing worth it?

Will it tone down imperfections or heighten them?

My goal here is *perfection* for it to look almost machine-made. I'm always looking for way to improve symmetry and smoothness.


I've seen but haven't read your other posts about making these teapots, so sorry about asking questions that you've already answered elsewhere and I'm too lazy to look up, but: These are handbuilt, right? Are these your first teapots? (I like them.) Since I don't know how high they will be fired, I don't know if burnishing is worth it, but am guessing that it isn't.

Jim
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"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#4 neilestrick

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 08:19 AM

A highly polished surface will dull when it is fired.
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#5 TJR

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 08:25 AM

Burnishing is a low fire technique, never meant to be fired higher than cone06.Neil and Jim are correct. It will burn off in higher temperatures.
TJR.

#6 futurebird

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 09:10 AM

Burnishing is a low fire technique, never meant to be fired higher than cone06.Neil and Jim are correct. It will burn off in higher temperatures.
TJR.


How do the masters get their pots so shiny? I know some are polished after firing-- or coated in tea after years of use... but even new pots seem to shine...

Posted Image

The idea of using slip to burnish in interesting, but I wonder of it is done that way in China. This clay has been worked for 600 years I want to learn the traditional way before I modify it

I was told that you polish the pot with ox horn... so that's what I tried to do.
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#7 futurebird

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 09:20 AM

I've seen but haven't read your other posts about making these teapots, so sorry about asking questions that you've already answered elsewhere and I'm too lazy to look up, but: These are handbuilt, right? Are these your first teapots? (I like them.) Since I don't know how high they will be fired, I don't know if burnishing is worth it, but am guessing that it isn't.

Jim



These are my 12th and 13th hand built pots you don't want to see the first one. Posted Image
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#8 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 09:24 AM

After applying terra sig to a bone dry piece, I buff it with a soft cloth. I never liked the streaks created by using a hard tool to burnish.

Marcia

#9 Chris Campbell

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 03:20 PM

Just taking a stab at it ... But a lovely terra sig will leave that kind of a surface and survives firing ... At least mine have to cone 6.

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#10 JBaymore

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 04:20 PM

Maybe make a terra sig out of the Yixing clay body you are using. Not hard to do. Google it.

best,

.............john
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#11 JLowes

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 08:49 PM

It is my understanding that Yixing clay (zisha clay) unique to Yixing, and thus maybe the shine comes from the properties of that clay, rather than burnishing or terra sig. I think I read that it has iron, quartz and mica in the clay, and is running out. Get those teapots while you still can.

John




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