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Marge

What reading on a hydrometer?

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Marge    0

Hey there... I'm trying to be more accurate than dipping my finger in the glaze to determine thickness. I just bought a hydrometer and reading online says all different ranges are appropriate. I've mixed 3 different 4 gallon buckets and I think they are too thick. Two of them are Shatz (glossy black and ketchup red) and the other is Jon and Ron's Waterfall glaze. (If that info helps at all...)

 

Thanks... I can't wait to start dipping!!---Margierolleyes.gif

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TJR    359

Marge;

I actually just experienced this last weekend. I brought one of my glazes over to my buddies place so he could test the thickness. We fire a gas reduction kiln together.[his]. The number was 45. He said it was perfect. The problem is that this glaze runs, so I am adding percentages of EPK to a test.I haven't bought the hydrometer yet.

His words;"Tom,it's about time you got professional." I have been using the hand webbing test for 38 years. Seems to work.

TJR.

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Mark C.    1,808

I learned the dip the hand back in early 70's but switched over to hydrometers 20 years ago when I started wearing latex gloves when glazing.

There are 3 scales on the ones I use-I use the hundreds scale so most glazes are close to say 1500 to 1600

Each glaze has its own number for best thickness.

This takes some time to learn

 

 

Many of these tools -hydrometers -digital pyrometers and oxygen meters are just tools that make work easier say like a screw driver trumps a pocket knife.

Many choose to still use a pocket knife for screws-they work but the right tool is faster.

I still can fire the reduction kiln without any meters or cones but its easier to use the newer modern tools like cones and meters.

Mark

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TJR    359

I learned the dip the hand back in early 70's but switched over to hydrometers 20 years ago when I started wearing latex gloves when glazing.

There are 3 scales on the ones I use-I use the hundreds scale so most glazes are close to say 1500 to 1600

Each glaze has its own number for best thickness.

This takes some time to learn

 

 

Many of these tools -hydrometers -digital pyrometers and oxygen meters are just tools that make work easier say like a screw driver trumps a pocket knife.

Many choose to still use a pocket knife for screws-they work but the right tool is faster.

I still can fire the reduction kiln without any meters or cones but its easier to use the newer modern tools like cones and meters.

Mark

 

 

Are you saying I should buy a set of screwdrivers? O.K.,O.K.. I'll get a hydrometer, now that I know how to work it. I used to bisque without cones,firing by colour, but gave that up too.

TJR.

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Mark C.    1,808

I learned the dip the hand back in early 70's but switched over to hydrometers 20 years ago when I started wearing latex gloves when glazing.

There are 3 scales on the ones I use-I use the hundreds scale so most glazes are close to say 1500 to 1600

Each glaze has its own number for best thickness.

This takes some time to learn

 

 

Many of these tools -hydrometers -digital pyrometers and oxygen meters are just tools that make work easier say like a screw driver trumps a pocket knife.

Many choose to still use a pocket knife for screws-they work but the right tool is faster.

I still can fire the reduction kiln without any meters or cones but its easier to use the newer modern tools like cones and meters.

Mark

 

 

Are you saying I should buy a set of screwdrivers? O.K.,O.K.. I'll get a hydrometer, now that I know how to work it. I used to bisque without cones,firing by colour, but gave that up too.

TJR.

 

 

Tom

I still bisque without cones-

But I do have own about 50 screwdrivers

Mark

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