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Wax On, Wax Off,


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#1 Benzine

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 10:56 PM

First off, sorry for the topic title, I couldn't RESIST.......

So, I've got a couple questions, regarding the use of different types of resists, for glazing. First off, I like wax resist. It goes on easy and works fairly well. However, one of the problems I've had, is that it's tough to clean any of the brushes I use with it. Nothing ever really seems to get all the wax out of the bristles. This is why, I only allow my students, to use a designated brush, for the wax resist. So what's a good way to clean brushes, and keep them clean, when using wax resist. Second, whenever I use the resist, which more often than not has me pouring a second color over the first, the resist areas have areas of beaded glaze that stick there. Try as I might, I can never get all of them wiped off, without disturbing the non-resist areas. So when I fire the pieces, I'll have some glaze that falls off onto the shelves. Any good way to avoid this?

Finally, I have used latex resist in the past, but the type I used gradually clumped in the bottle, until I just had to toss it. Is this something that can be avoided, or is there a brand, where this is less of an issue? In a pinch, I recently used a maskoid watercolor resist, which worked well. However, I did have to use a lot of it, and it's a little too pricey to use that often.

Thanks for your help folks.
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#2 Biglou13

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 11:27 PM

Try cleaning brushes in hot water, Boiling microwave hot..

Try putting in drying cabinet after painting first resist. (Paint the fence)

Try q tips.

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#3 Mark C.

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 01:14 AM

I suggest using a cut sponge to apply wax. Cut a synthetic sponge into pieces (I use the cheap 2 1/2 inch round sponges-orange) with sharp edges and dip into water before using in wax-ring it out and use it to wax with then let it sit in covere tub with wax so it never dries out.This is a production potters tool-brush takes to long and works to slow and requires massive clean up times. I have NEVER seen a wax sponge being taught in schools-always a brush-they both have thier uses.
If you must use a brush use real hot water to clean it-rubbing alcohol works ok as well.
All waxes are not the same what types/brand are you using?
Mark
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#4 Diane Puckett

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 06:01 AM

I buy bags of cosmetic sponges, available in any drugstore. They are little, white wedges. They can be washed but are so inexpensive I generally just throw the sponge away after glazing.
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#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 07:07 AM

Wax On and Wax Off are two brand names from Ceramics Store in Phila. I have both but have not yet used the Wax on.
The Wax off peels off the piece.
I use Aftoosa wax. I have not had it clump. I dilute it a little and add alumina to a mix for waxing porcelain. I clean my brushes with SHout out or dish soap and hot water.

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#6 Bette

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 07:26 AM

Before using brush for waxing, rub a small drop of liquid dish soap into bristles. The wax will rinse out easily.

+1 for blazing hot water for rinsing.

#7 TJR

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 07:52 AM

Benzine;
I use those cheap dollar store sponge brushes. They are one inch wide and are black. Pretty inexpensive. I dedicate one to my wax resist bowl in my studio, and wash it with hot water after use. At my high school job, I don't usually use wax as they are painting on glaze, not dipping.
In England, I used a type of rubber cement called Copydex for resist on the side of the pot. You could pick up the edge with a needle tool.
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#8 Iforgot

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 08:22 AM

I am so glad you asked, I Just found a way to get all the wax out of brushes.



1 - soak brushes un boiling hot water for about 2 min

2 - pull brushes out and while hot shampoo the bristles of the brush with fabric softener.

3 - rinse brushes

4 - repeat steps 1 - 3 two to three tomes

5 - Soak brushes in Coca-Cola for 24-48 hours (This is the trick)



Good Luck!


Darrel
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#9 OffCenter

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 08:25 AM

I think the solution may be as simple as finding the right wax resist. The wax resist I get from Davens in Atlanta washes off the brushes with cold water just a glaze. If the resist dries on the brush I use hot water.

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#10 Mossyrock

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 09:02 AM

I use Forbes water-based wax. I have a dedicated brush for using in my majolica decorating and I put a few drops of dishwashing liquid on it before dipping it in the wax. I also put dishwashing liquid in the water for keeping it from drying out because I will use it many times during a decorating session (the jar is the taller baby food jar and I put a clothes pin on the brush so that it suspends just the bristles in the water .... the clothes pin rests on top of the jar). I've used the same brush for years.....never a waxy buildup.

If I'm waxing the bottom of a pot before glazing, I use a piece of sponge cut from one of those mattress toppers - the egg crate type. The little knobs make perfect 'fingers' for waxing.

I agree with Jim.....I think the type of wax makes a difference in the cleanup.
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#11 Mark C.

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 10:18 AM

I use Mobilcer-A from Laguna Clay. I thin it a little with water. Never had it go bad. It cleans with water unless it dries.Glaze beads up wll on it for easy wipe off.
I have used many waxs over the years and this is what works well for me. I buy it in 5 gallon bucket size now.
Mark
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#12 Min

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 12:19 PM

To get a really smooth nearly non beading surface I run a heat gun over the wax for a few seconds then wipe the wax with a piece of plastic wrap (saran or cling film), gives a waxed surface as good as hot wax does. The heat gun trick also works if you don't have time to let the resist dry, just be careful not to leave the heat on one area for more than a few seconds. Takes about 15 seconds to do the bottom of a platter.

Foam shops have scrap cut-off's, I have a bag of those which I cut off small strips of and dampen with water then use those to apply resist. I just toss them when done. (The firm density make good throwing sponges)

In areas like casserole galleries where the foam is awkward to use I use a damp, slightly soapy brush then rinse with hot water when done and put it through the dishwasher on the top level. (dollar store brushes)

Min

#13 Benzine

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 09:38 PM

Thank you all, for the suggestions. I like the sponge brush idea. I'll have to give that a whirl. But water soluble wax resist? That sounds like the type of black magic that gave the art world, water soluble oil paints.

I buy my wax resist from my clay supplier, Continental Clay. The resist looks light green, like those Shamrock Shakes, McDonald's sells around St. Patrick's Day.

I have tried to use Q-tips to remove the beads, but I can never get all of them, especially with my more intricate designs.

In regards to clumping, it's not the wax resist, that I have a problem with. That always stays nice a smooth. It's the latex resist, from the same company, that I had an issue with. When it was new, it worked great. But as time went on, it started to clump together in the bottle, despite, being completely sealed.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#14 neilestrick

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 09:24 AM

The wax sold by Ceramic Supply NY/NJ and Ceramic Supply Chicago washes out clean with cold water. Never gums up. For your second pour, water down the glaze a bit more. It will run off the waxed areas better.
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#15 Benzine

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 10:27 PM

The wax sold by Ceramic Supply NY/NJ and Ceramic Supply Chicago washes out clean with cold water. Never gums up. For your second pour, water down the glaze a bit more. It will run off the waxed areas better.


Watering down the glaze, for the second coat, make sense. I'll give it a shot.
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#16 nairda

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 09:32 PM

Try stirring small amounts of water into the jar of latex when it starts to get a little thick. In addition to keeping the jar tightly closed it helps to then put it in a ziplock bag. Also a good idea to not store it in your kiln room. I use Mold Maker brand (sold at chain craft stores). I had the same problem with Forbes wax on highly textured surfaces...all those tiny glaze droplets in places a sponge won't easily clean. Faster to peel off the latex than do all that sponging.

#17 Pres

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 10:08 AM

Thank you all, for the suggestions. I like the sponge brush idea. I'll have to give that a whirl. But water soluble wax resist? That sounds like the type of black magic that gave the art world, water soluble oil paints.

I buy my wax resist from my clay supplier, Continental Clay. The resist looks light green, like those Shamrock Shakes, McDonald's sells around St. Patrick's Day.

I have tried to use Q-tips to remove the beads, but I can never get all of them, especially with my more intricate designs.

In regards to clumping, it's not the wax resist, that I have a problem with. That always stays nice a smooth. It's the latex resist, from the same company, that I had an issue with. When it was new, it worked great. But as time went on, it started to clump together in the bottle, despite, being completely sealed.


Last few years at school, I ordered the water based wax resist. Found there were two types other there-one for on clay, one for on glazed areas. Now find there is a third for all areas. The Van Gilder book from DYI shows him using sponge brushes to apply his resists, so I tried that. They clean up very well, and you can get a nice even coating. There are time that you want a regular brush line for clean wax resist. For that I have used the brush, and cleaned it up with a little dish detergent. When I used hot water, I got a gummy sort of wax that was harder to remove. This may have been because of the brand though. As far as the beading of glaze on the resist, I keep some stiff oil painting brushes that are varied in size as dusters. When the glaze is dry, dust off.

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#18 JohnDonovan71

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 12:14 AM

While working on a commission (lots of 9" pasta bowls for a local restaurant) I was frustrated with the glaze beading on the waxed bottoms. I started buffing the wax with a cotton rag after it has dried for about 5 minutes (I will wax 3-5 bowls, go back and wipe/buff them, then continue waxing more bowls). The glaze falls off of buffed wax resist super-smooth, I can blow the wet glaze off or easily wipe it later when dry. It's an extra step, but I think it's quicker than wrestling with dried glaze drops on the waxed bottoms.



#19 Benzine

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 08:57 AM

While working on a commission (lots of 9" pasta bowls for a local restaurant) I was frustrated with the glaze beading on the waxed bottoms. I started buffing the wax with a cotton rag after it has dried for about 5 minutes (I will wax 3-5 bowls, go back and wipe/buff them, then continue waxing more bowls). The glaze falls off of buffed wax resist super-smooth, I can blow the wet glaze off or easily wipe it later when dry. It's an extra step, but I think it's quicker than wrestling with dried glaze drops on the waxed bottoms.


Another great suggestion.

I'm trying a new latex resist, in my class this year. Hopefully it doesn't clump in the bottle like the previous stuff I tried.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#20 Wyndham

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 01:27 PM

For the bottoms of pots, an electric grill from goodwill ($20) and some wax from hobbylobby(10lb/$15). keep the temp below the smoking point of the wax and sit their little butts in the hot wax and away we go........I couldn't RESIST arg. :)

disposable makeup sponge  applicators for decorations with other liquid wax

Wyndham






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