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Thixotropic Glaze? How do I do THIS?


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#1 RPMpottery

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 10:44 PM

http://www.christina...christensen.dk/

I've seen this a time or two before. Looks low fire? Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.

Paul

#2 Mesi

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 08:06 AM

Are you completely sure it's glaze and not some sort of fast hardening epoxy applied after the pieces are fired?

#3 oldlady

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 08:50 AM

http://www.christina...christensen.dk/

I've seen this a time or two before. Looks low fire? Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.

Paul


the video shows the temperature as 1280C which translates to something lower than cone 018 on the cone chart page 274 in "the ceramics bible". yet the next page shows temps between 1200 and 1300C to be between 2192F and 2372F. ( i think someone mislabeled the title on the charts in this 2011 book )

my good old fifth edition, published in 1984, of glenn c nelson's "Ceramics, a potter's handbook", shows 1280C to be cone 9, equivalent to both Orton and Seger cone 9.

go figure, you can't believe everything that you read in the "bible".
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#4 neilestrick

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 10:39 AM

Her "glaze" is probably more of a low fire slip. The ooze looks a lot like earthenware fired way too hot, like when kilns over fire.
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#5 Matt Oz

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 12:42 PM

In the glass world this is called a pot melt, and is a good way to recycle scraps. You melt pieces of glass (often of mixed colors) in a pot with a hole in the bottom, the melting glass flows out and pools underneath creating a new sheet of glass that can be used for projects.

Video...

The impression I got from the artists video is that it took her a lot of experimentation with the glaze recipe to get it to melt and flow(viscosity) just right in the kiln.

Looks like it's cone 9 like oldlady said, but I would think you could do this at cone six or lower with the right recipe. Looks fun



#6 mregecko

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 01:04 PM

In the glass world this is called a pot melt, and is a good way to recycle scraps. You melt pieces of glass (often of mixed colors) in a pot with a hole in the bottom, the melting glass flows out and pools underneath creating a new sheet of glass that can be used for projects.

Video...http://www.youtube.c...h?v=TsiyiPy8nHE

The impression I got from the artists video is that it took her a lot of experimentation with the glaze recipe to get it to melt and flow(viscosity) just right in the kiln.

Looks like it's cone 9 like oldlady said, but I would think you could do this at cone six or lower with the right recipe. Looks fun


It's definitely possible at Cone 6 -- I've had it happen unintentionally... (Yeah, I'm looking at you, Potter's Choice Palladium). Just requires a glaze that's runny enough and the right coincidence (or testing) with firing time, cool-down schedule, etc.

#7 jrgpots

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 01:23 PM

http://www.christina...christensen.dk/

I've seen this a time or two before. Looks low fire? Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.

Paul



Very cool. If you work out the details please share! It would be fun to try this.

jed

#8 missholly

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 01:26 PM

amazing! i love it!!
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#9 shoo

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 03:29 PM

Thanks for your interest in my work :)



Its a ceramic glaze that I developed - and I fire somewhere between 1190 celcius up to 1300 degrees celcius- its all a matter of viscosity, size of holes in the containers, kiln size etc.
My coming experiments is trying to find a high viscous, low fired, glaze so I can do this at lower temperatures. And yes, I've also heard from glass people that this technique is well known in the glass world :)


I also tried with real glass in a ceramic container - looks wicked! - you can see more pics at my facebook page - like if you like www.facebook.com/csckeramik

#10 AtomicAxe

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 01:13 PM

Ussually when I see the word thixotropic it's in relation to clay and being able to make a clay that when you hand work it, becomes more liquid like. Sort of the same properties of corn starch in water ... http://www.hulu.com/watch/487616 ...

What was posted was just as others have said, a clay body that fluxes out to pour through spots in a body like glass, but not fluid enough to completely melt ... otherwise that would be a glaze and not be stable enough to support itself in relation to the clay body without being brittle. ingenious really.


#11 Matt Oz

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 05:36 PM

Thanks for your interest in my work Posted Image



Its a ceramic glaze that I developed - and I fire somewhere between 1190 celcius up to 1300 degrees celcius- its all a matter of viscosity, size of holes in the containers, kiln size etc.
My coming experiments is trying to find a high viscous, low fired, glaze so I can do this at lower temperatures. And yes, I've also heard from glass people that this technique is well known in the glass world Posted Image


I also tried with real glass in a ceramic container - looks wicked! - you can see more pics at my facebook page - like if you like www.facebook.com/csckeramik

Thanks for dropping in Christina, your work is great, nice to see something so innovative.

#12 OffCenter

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 06:24 PM


Thanks for your interest in my work Posted Image



Its a ceramic glaze that I developed - and I fire somewhere between 1190 celcius up to 1300 degrees celcius- its all a matter of viscosity, size of holes in the containers, kiln size etc.
My coming experiments is trying to find a high viscous, low fired, glaze so I can do this at lower temperatures. And yes, I've also heard from glass people that this technique is well known in the glass world Posted Image


I also tried with real glass in a ceramic container - looks wicked! - you can see more pics at my facebook page - like if you like www.facebook.com/csckeramik

Thanks for dropping in Christina, your work is great, nice to see something so innovative.


Ditto!

Jim
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#13 Kohaku

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 06:42 PM

Thanks for your interest in my work Posted Image



Its a ceramic glaze that I developed - and I fire somewhere between 1190 celcius up to 1300 degrees celcius- its all a matter of viscosity, size of holes in the containers, kiln size etc.
My coming experiments is trying to find a high viscous, low fired, glaze so I can do this at lower temperatures. And yes, I've also heard from glass people that this technique is well known in the glass world Posted Image


I also tried with real glass in a ceramic container - looks wicked! - you can see more pics at my facebook page - like if you like www.facebook.com/csckeramik


I concur with everyone about the beauty of these pieces.

Are the source vessels all raw clay, or some of those also glazed? Lovely, granite-like texture in a few instances...
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#14 shoo

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 10:36 AM

thanks a lot Again ;)



the containers, both the brown and the grey ones, are raw claybodies. The brown clay is taking alot of its 'glow' from the glaze that has been 'sweating' on them. The grey clay doesn't seem to change that much..




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