Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Jennifer Harnetty

      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.
Sign in to follow this  
RPMpottery

Thixotropic Glaze? How do I do THIS?

Recommended Posts

http://www.christina...christensen.dk/

 

I've seen this a time or two before. Looks low fire? Any suggestions?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Paul

 

 

the video shows the temperature as 1280C which translates to something lower than cone 018 on the cone chart page 274 in "the ceramics bible". yet the next page shows temps between 1200 and 1300C to be between 2192F and 2372F. ( i think someone mislabeled the title on the charts in this 2011 book )

 

my good old fifth edition, published in 1984, of glenn c nelson's "Ceramics, a potter's handbook", shows 1280C to be cone 9, equivalent to both Orton and Seger cone 9.

 

go figure, you can't believe everything that you read in the "bible".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the glass world this is called a pot melt, and is a good way to recycle scraps. You melt pieces of glass (often of mixed colors) in a pot with a hole in the bottom, the melting glass flows out and pools underneath creating a new sheet of glass that can be used for projects.

 

Video...

 

The impression I got from the artists video is that it took her a lot of experimentation with the glaze recipe to get it to melt and flow(viscosity) just right in the kiln.

 

Looks like it's cone 9 like oldlady said, but I would think you could do this at cone six or lower with the right recipe. Looks fun

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the glass world this is called a pot melt, and is a good way to recycle scraps. You melt pieces of glass (often of mixed colors) in a pot with a hole in the bottom, the melting glass flows out and pools underneath creating a new sheet of glass that can be used for projects.

 

Video...

 

The impression I got from the artists video is that it took her a lot of experimentation with the glaze recipe to get it to melt and flow(viscosity) just right in the kiln.

 

Looks like it's cone 9 like oldlady said, but I would think you could do this at cone six or lower with the right recipe. Looks fun

 

 

It's definitely possible at Cone 6 -- I've had it happen unintentionally... (Yeah, I'm looking at you, Potter's Choice Palladium). Just requires a glaze that's runny enough and the right coincidence (or testing) with firing time, cool-down schedule, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your interest in my work :)

 

 

 

Its a ceramic glaze that I developed - and I fire somewhere between 1190 celcius up to 1300 degrees celcius- its all a matter of viscosity, size of holes in the containers, kiln size etc.

My coming experiments is trying to find a high viscous, low fired, glaze so I can do this at lower temperatures. And yes, I've also heard from glass people that this technique is well known in the glass world :)

 

 

I also tried with real glass in a ceramic container - looks wicked! - you can see more pics at my facebook page - like if you like www.facebook.com/csckeramik

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ussually when I see the word thixotropic it's in relation to clay and being able to make a clay that when you hand work it, becomes more liquid like. Sort of the same properties of corn starch in water ... http://www.hulu.com/watch/487616 ...

 

What was posted was just as others have said, a clay body that fluxes out to pour through spots in a body like glass, but not fluid enough to completely melt ... otherwise that would be a glaze and not be stable enough to support itself in relation to the clay body without being brittle. ingenious really.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your interest in my work smile.gif

 

 

 

Its a ceramic glaze that I developed - and I fire somewhere between 1190 celcius up to 1300 degrees celcius- its all a matter of viscosity, size of holes in the containers, kiln size etc.

My coming experiments is trying to find a high viscous, low fired, glaze so I can do this at lower temperatures. And yes, I've also heard from glass people that this technique is well known in the glass world smile.gif

 

 

I also tried with real glass in a ceramic container - looks wicked! - you can see more pics at my facebook page - like if you like www.facebook.com/csckeramik

 

Thanks for dropping in Christina, your work is great, nice to see something so innovative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your interest in my work smile.gif

 

 

 

Its a ceramic glaze that I developed - and I fire somewhere between 1190 celcius up to 1300 degrees celcius- its all a matter of viscosity, size of holes in the containers, kiln size etc.

My coming experiments is trying to find a high viscous, low fired, glaze so I can do this at lower temperatures. And yes, I've also heard from glass people that this technique is well known in the glass world smile.gif

 

 

I also tried with real glass in a ceramic container - looks wicked! - you can see more pics at my facebook page - like if you like www.facebook.com/csckeramik

 

Thanks for dropping in Christina, your work is great, nice to see something so innovative.

 

 

Ditto!

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your interest in my work smile.gif

 

 

 

Its a ceramic glaze that I developed - and I fire somewhere between 1190 celcius up to 1300 degrees celcius- its all a matter of viscosity, size of holes in the containers, kiln size etc.

My coming experiments is trying to find a high viscous, low fired, glaze so I can do this at lower temperatures. And yes, I've also heard from glass people that this technique is well known in the glass world smile.gif

 

 

I also tried with real glass in a ceramic container - looks wicked! - you can see more pics at my facebook page - like if you like www.facebook.com/csckeramik

 

 

I concur with everyone about the beauty of these pieces.

 

Are the source vessels all raw clay, or some of those also glazed? Lovely, granite-like texture in a few instances...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks a lot Again ;)

 

 

 

the containers, both the brown and the grey ones, are raw claybodies. The brown clay is taking alot of its 'glow' from the glaze that has been 'sweating' on them. The grey clay doesn't seem to change that much..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.