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Another kiln build thread...


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#41 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 12:28 AM

Big Lou,
You can use flu liners for your chimney once you get about the height of the kiln. I used ceramic sewer pipe on one kiln.
Yoou are in Utah which may have a high altitude. You may need to go 20 or 25 feet. Depending on the size of your kiln and type of burner. I think I saw a Venturi in your pics. So high er may be needed. I went about 25 feet in Montana for 3000 ft above sea level.
Fiber is Five times the insulating Quality of hard bricks. if you are short on Bricks, get fiber ..look on eBay. use it on the inside unless you are firing soda? use it on the outside but protect it from rain..maybe a skin of homemade castable as an outer shell. don't compress the fiber when you do that.
As for a pyrometer, I wouldn't use one on a gas kiln. just get cones.
they are getting pricey too.
A catenary arch is the most space for least material. by the look of your shelves, you could stack one easily.
get decent posts.
Marcia

#42 Mark C.

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 02:07 AM

Heres my old hard brick catenary kiln from the early 70's-You got inside and loaded the back walk with others feeding you the pots.

Then got out and stacked the front.

It sucked up more gas than we could afford-we split the bill 4-6 ways.

It was a 4-6 year deal and then I replaced it with soft brick car kiln

The bricks where free the fuel was the cost.

it took forever to heat this monster.

Mark

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Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#43 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 10:26 AM

I always built my doors to "step out" in two layers and under the arch. Chinked if there were any leaks. That one really was leaking! I can see why it cost you so much in gas!
Marcia

#44 Biglou13

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 07:22 PM

Mark
Why didn't you slap some mud on the leaky bits?

Marcia,
I do have the parts for 2 forced air burners,
I'm thinking of building some kind of hybrid/ multi heat source ...wood, and forced air propane, sawdust.
I've fallen in love with woodfired pottery.
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#45 Mark C.

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 01:42 AM

Lets see If I recall back in the early 70's the door was stepped  with an inner and outer layer and we did chink it up with a clay vermiculite mix.

What I recall was we had really junk bricks (this where free from a rotating pulp mill lime kiln) to they are only flat on one plane.They are slanted on the other 4 sides.

All this really means it they are hard to seal anything with. The arch was huge and expanded as they do as well the door and in this fire it really tossed out the chinks.

We really should have gotten some good brick for the door-the chimmy was worse with scrap of scrap bricks but I have no photos.

These days where my starving artist days-remember since 1976 I have been a full time potter but the 1st 1-6 years I took and odd job or two but buying NEW bricks was not in the thought process.I did get to build some kilns for others with new bricks so I knew how to back then.

The next kiln here for me was a soft /hard brick car kiln in the later 70's-I have since rebuilt that as well.

I still have a pile of pulp mill bricks if you want some?Very hard to work with.I laid a floor with them around my salt kiln.They are 4 1/2 iches thick x10"ish  at one end 7' at the other-they form a 20 foot circle that rotates at a slant very slowy in a lime kiln.

Mark


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#46 jpc

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 09:50 AM

Great info! Makes me want to build another kiln!  Biglou 13, might I suggest you do the best to use the best materials possible. Scrimping on the material is scrimping on the kiln! NG. No offense to your kiln shelves but, well... you were taken on a pony ride for sure! Best of luck with your kiln! JPC



#47 Mycoftsmith

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Posted 14 October 2014 - 06:23 AM

Some also include a bit of portland cement to harden it. Straight clay or mud will shrink and crack off, so the other materials are very important.

 

Yeah Agree with it






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