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Nancy S.

Wiring off

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Nancy S.    21

I have seen people throw pots of various sizes on the wheel, and sometimes they wire it off while the wheel is stationary, while other times the wheel is moving slowly around while the wire is dragged all the way through. Still other times, the wheel moves slowly while the wire is dragged partway through and then back out the same way it came.

 

Ignoring the "to wire or not wire off" debate (that's a whole 'nother thread), can anyone please explain to me what the differences are between these wiring-off techniques? Is it just a matter of preference, or is there a logical reason behind each one?

 

Thoughts appreciated!!

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Pres    896

I wire a lot of different ways. When working with a tall large pot, I wire with the wheel stopped, and carefully pull the wire all the way through. When throwing off of the the hump, I usually wire after marking the base with a deep groove from the rib while the wheel is turning. Most time off of the hump when throwing cups, small mugs, bowls etc I use an old fashioned butter knife and slice through the base, removing the pot on the knife. On smaller pots on the head, I usually pull the wire through with the wheel moving. These days I use a wiggle wire a lot, and this gives a nice swirl on the base of the pot. I like the effect, but smooth part of it afterwards and place my signature and chop on the smoothed area.

 

I guess in a lot of ways the cut is up to what you are comfortable with, how you learned/were taught, and how much you experiment.

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Biglou13    202

I have seen people throw pots of various sizes on the wheel, and sometimes they wire it off while the wheel is stationary, while other times the wheel is moving slowly around while the wire is dragged all the way through. Still other times, the wheel moves slowly while the wire is dragged partway through and then back out the same way it came.

 

Ignoring the "to wire or not wire off" debate (that's a whole 'nother thread), can anyone please explain to me what the differences are between these wiring-off techniques? Is it just a matter of preference, or is there a logical reason behind each one?

 

Thoughts appreciated!!

 

 

I'm no expert so (caveat emptor) however I have stayed at holiday inn.

 

Wax on, wax off........

 

At first I went both ways....... Wiring off that is....

 

Then I switched to straight pull.

 

With spin technique i noticed there would be tendencies for less tension on wire which resulted in in consistent or dirty bottoms and more clay left on bat.

With the dirty bottoms the piece would not easily slide to edge of batt. So I found my self, just pulling wire through again.

I think psychologically you'll pull a stiffer wire and pull through a bottom more consistently with a non moving bat.

I now,just straight pull, some times twice.

 

Some wire off spinning, some wire off static, wax on.... Wax off..... Some go both ways ...... Some are just "experimenting" B)/> , some just do what the cool guys do.....

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perkolator    53

I'm a fan of sponging off the piece to get standing water off and be more tacky, wiring it off while slowly spinning, dry my hands a bit, then lift the piece off the wheelhead and set it on a board. First time I saw someone do this I was dumbfounded, but now I don't even bother with any other ways like water-sliding a piece or using bats (I really only use bats on stuff like large bowls) - but I'm also not a potter doing this daily, and I don't hold any sentiment with pieces until they are glaze fired.

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I keep my wheel spinning when cutting it off the batt. A slow speed with a slow pull of the wire, if you drag it through too quickly I find it sticks back down. I also like the pattern that it makes on the bottom, a nice rainbow shape laugh.gif

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

It depends. When throwing off the hump, I keep it moving because I am usually throwing production pieces quickly. ..like 120 small tea bowls for tea tasting event at the Art Museum. I have also used the string technique where the end of the string is wrapped in the groove and cuts off the piece on the hump. The marking looks like the symbol in Studio Potter Magazine.

Yesterday, I was throwing small porcelain test pieces for an upcoming workshop.

These were very thin and the clay was wet. I cut off with the wheel stopped. I have several different lengths of wires. Four cutting off the 4" squares, I have a 7" wire.

 

Marcia

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