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Airbrush Compressor Purchase Suggestions Needed


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#1 Mossyrock

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Posted 22 August 2010 - 05:24 PM

I have an airbrush my son used years ago, but do not have a compressor. I decorate my pottery with majolica glazes and would like to try using the airbrush. Any ideas or suggestions on what kind of compressor I need to purchase would be appreciated.....there seems to be a lot of options out there and I'm not sure which model/brand would work best. Also if anyone has pointers on using the airbrush in this way....... Thanks, Brenda
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#2 Seasoned Warrior

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Posted 22 August 2010 - 11:25 PM

I have an airbrush my son used years ago, but do not have a compressor. I decorate my pottery with majolica glazes and would like to try using the airbrush. Any ideas or suggestions on what kind of compressor I need to purchase would be appreciated.....there seems to be a lot of options out there and I'm not sure which model/brand would work best. Also if anyone has pointers on using the airbrush in this way....... Thanks, Brenda


The compressor doesn't really matter as long as it can maintain at least 50 psi and covers the flow rate pf the airbrush. This is overkill but I use an Ingersoll Rand 51 I have from another business I used to operate. The thing that I suggest you use is a good regulator and a water and oil separator and an excellent filter, it's money well spent. You really don't want contaminants in your air that can cause you to have a problem with your glazes. Good filtration is essential. You may wish to use a compressor that is a diaphragm type since that eliminates that possiblity of compressor crank case oil in your air but any compressor from a building material supplier would work well and may be cheaper than a compressor specifically designed for an airbrush.. Someting that many artists use for portability and ease of transpoertation is a CO2 cylinder and a regulator to reduce the pressure to your working pressure. using a larger compressor than you need is a good idea since you can use that compressor for other things than just an airbrush such as a vacuum system to de-air plaster of paris for molds.
Regards,
Charles

#3 Mossyrock

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Posted 23 August 2010 - 09:00 PM


I have an airbrush my son used years ago, but do not have a compressor. I decorate my pottery with majolica glazes and would like to try using the airbrush. Any ideas or suggestions on what kind of compressor I need to purchase would be appreciated.....there seems to be a lot of options out there and I'm not sure which model/brand would work best. Also if anyone has pointers on using the airbrush in this way....... Thanks, Brenda


The compressor doesn't really matter as long as it can maintain at least 50 psi and covers the flow rate pf the airbrush. This is overkill but I use an Ingersoll Rand 51 I have from another business I used to operate. The thing that I suggest you use is a good regulator and a water and oil separator and an excellent filter, it's money well spent. You really don't want contaminants in your air that can cause you to have a problem with your glazes. Good filtration is essential. You may wish to use a compressor that is a diaphragm type since that eliminates that possiblity of compressor crank case oil in your air but any compressor from a building material supplier would work well and may be cheaper than a compressor specifically designed for an airbrush.. Someting that many artists use for portability and ease of transpoertation is a CO2 cylinder and a regulator to reduce the pressure to your working pressure. using a larger compressor than you need is a good idea since you can use that compressor for other things than just an airbrush such as a vacuum system to de-air plaster of paris for molds.
Regards,
Charles


Thank you Charles. I do have a small compressor we use to put air in tires, etc. Didn't realize it would work. I'll give it a try. You may have just saved me $$$$!
Brenda
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Mossy Rock Creations
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#4 railroadpugs

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Posted 24 August 2010 - 11:30 AM


I have an airbrush my son used years ago, but do not have a compressor. I decorate my pottery with majolica glazes and would like to try using the airbrush. Any ideas or suggestions on what kind of compressor I need to purchase would be appreciated.....there seems to be a lot of options out there and I'm not sure which model/brand would work best. Also if anyone has pointers on using the airbrush in this way....... Thanks, Brenda


The compressor doesn't really matter as long as it can maintain at least 50 psi and covers the flow rate pf the airbrush. This is overkill but I use an Ingersoll Rand 51 I have from another business I used to operate. The thing that I suggest you use is a good regulator and a water and oil separator and an excellent filter, it's money well spent. You really don't want contaminants in your air that can cause you to have a problem with your glazes. Good filtration is essential. You may wish to use a compressor that is a diaphragm type since that eliminates that possiblity of compressor crank case oil in your air but any compressor from a building material supplier would work well and may be cheaper than a compressor specifically designed for an airbrush.. Someting that many artists use for portability and ease of transpoertation is a CO2 cylinder and a regulator to reduce the pressure to your working pressure. using a larger compressor than you need is a good idea since you can use that compressor for other things than just an airbrush such as a vacuum system to de-air plaster of paris for molds.
Regards,
Charles


i bought a 10 gallon ,,120 psi air compressor at an estate auction for 50 bucks,,,went to lowe's hardware and bought an air pressure reducing valve fo 12 bucks and can use air gun or air brush with this valve...goes from 5 psi up to 120 psi with a twist of the knob...

#5 Seasoned Warrior

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Posted 26 August 2010 - 12:40 AM



I have an airbrush my son used years ago, but do not have a compressor. I decorate my pottery with majolica glazes and would like to try using the airbrush. Any ideas or suggestions on what kind of compressor I need to purchase would be appreciated.....there seems to be a lot of options out there and I'm not sure which model/brand would work best. Also if anyone has pointers on using the airbrush in this way....... Thanks, Brenda


The compressor doesn't really matter as long as it can maintain at least 50 psi and covers the flow rate pf the airbrush. This is overkill but I use an Ingersoll Rand 51 I have from another business I used to operate. The thing that I suggest you use is a good regulator and a water and oil separator and an excellent filter, it's money well spent. You really don't want contaminants in your air that can cause you to have a problem with your glazes. Good filtration is essential. You may wish to use a compressor that is a diaphragm type since that eliminates that possiblity of compressor crank case oil in your air but any compressor from a building material supplier would work well and may be cheaper than a compressor specifically designed for an airbrush.. Someting that many artists use for portability and ease of transpoertation is a CO2 cylinder and a regulator to reduce the pressure to your working pressure. using a larger compressor than you need is a good idea since you can use that compressor for other things than just an airbrush such as a vacuum system to de-air plaster of paris for molds.
Regards,
Charles


Thank you Charles. I do have a small compressor we use to put air in tires, etc. Didn't realize it would work. I'll give it a try. You may have just saved me $$$$!
Brenda


Saving money is good! Yes it should work. Check the air consumption requirements for the gun (usually in CFM) but I don't think you will have any problems.

Best regards,
Charles

#6 Idaho Potter

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 05:59 PM

Air brushes are not designed for liquids that have abrasives as an ingredient or with liquids that settle out. They work pretty well with underglazes, but you'll have to thin a regular glaze down so far to keep from plugging the tip that coverage could be a problem. See if you can find a glaze tip that will fit your air brush.

As to compressors, my first was a little Sears diaphragm ($10) that couldn't maintain pressure. Bought an old oxygen cylinder, fitted it with a short hose from compressor and when pressure had built in the tank, it worked like a charm. A little "seat of the pants" or Rube Goldberg method (no regulators), but I was young then and no one told me it wouldn't work--so it did! I now have a pancake compressor--with regulators, etc-- and it does a lot of work for me besides run my glaze gun.

#7 Melinda08

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Posted 08 September 2011 - 06:33 AM

Airbrush be used, there should be a good supply of air pressure. Almost all projects that use the airbrush does not require large air compressors or any other accessory manufacturers, but the kind of society will assist you determining what type and airbrush compressor, you should be. For small projects, using a smaller air compressor, but manufacturing, they will certainly need more. Before buying a compressor, air brush, airbrush compressor, determining first type. If you are a beginner, it is good that you buy an airbrush kit first. Airbrush kit contains everything needed specifically for the type of work you do. There are kits that are usually on cake decorating, t-shirts, makeup applications and automotive paint.

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#8 missholly

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Posted 29 December 2012 - 07:47 PM

so, what about a compressor with a tank vs. a tankless?
I've read that the compressor with a tank takes time to fill up, is loud but offers a smoother spray.
(tankless uses pistons, which interrupt the flow of paint/air)

how important is a 50 psi compressor?
most that I'm seeing under $100 are 25-30. is this acceptable?

i have an inflator/compressor that i got at lowes for $40.
the only thing I'm stuck on is the link between the compressor hose (it has a cap on the end with a plastic lever that is for inflating tires)
and my airbrush hose. is there an adapter? or should i just give up and get a compressor specifically for airbrushing?






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#9 Mark C.

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Posted 29 December 2012 - 11:46 PM

I have used both and really like the small tank oiless one I now use-it is really super quiet and has a dial up use pressure. I have had it for many years and I know there are other brands out there-I can look in am to see who makes it. Back in the day it was 100$.It is as quiet as any out there with no tank.
The model is Thomas T-607 the tank looks about 1- to 2 gallons
I have 4 compressors ( not counting a tire compressor)but most are for other uses..
This will run a glaze spray gun or an airbrush

I do not think a tire compressor will do your job no matter what adaptor you find


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#10 missholly

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 09:03 AM

thanks everyone for the info.
i ended up ordering a 1/5 hp 58 psi compressor and airbrush kit from harbor freight.ill give it a go and see how it does!
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