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#1 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 01:21 PM

I made my first teapot- right now it is glazing so I will be able to post a picture tomorrow. (lets hope the glaze looks nice, it's a dark clay body and I have not done a test tile) Anyways, I did a "test pour" after it was bisqued, and it poured out nice, but when I go back upright with it, it will drip down the spout a little. Is there a way to prevent this?
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#2 Mark C.

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 02:38 PM

The sharper the edge is the less the drip. These is a catch 22 thing as real thin and its to fragile.
On old timer trick I learned from my mentor is to put a very thin amount of butter on your finger and wipe under the tip of the spout-fluid then brecks away and rolls back down the inside not over the edge.
Mark Cortright
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#3 OffCenter

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 03:53 PM

As Mark said, "The sharper the edge is the less the drip" but it doesn't have to be thin to be sharp. Say the clay at the end of the spout is 1/8-inch thick. Don't make it any thinner but make sure the edges of that 1/8-inch wall are all sharp 90 degree angles instead of rounded. When you glaze the pot wipe the glaze away or, at least, leave it very thin so that the glaze doesn't round off those edges. Experiment with angles so that you actually make the end thinner but for such a short length that it isn't fragile and you'll find a way to make a drip-less or almost drip-less spout. (This is hard to explain without diagrams.)

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#4 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 04:37 PM

As Mark said, "The sharper the edge is the less the drip" but it doesn't have to be thin to be sharp. Say the clay at the end of the spout is 1/8-inch thick. Don't make it any thinner but make sure the edges of that 1/8-inch wall are all sharp 90 degree angles instead of rounded. When you glaze the pot wipe the glaze away or, at least, leave it very thin so that the glaze doesn't round off those edges. Experiment with angles so that you actually make the end thinner but for such a short length that it isn't fragile and you'll find a way to make a drip-less or almost drip-less spout. (This is hard to explain without diagrams.)

Jim


I think that is my problem, I kept running my finger around the rim of the spout to "smooth out edges"... I probably screwed myself with that move. My angle might be off too. I will post a picture tomorrow when My pots are done, maybe you can copy the pic and draw on it to show me the correct placement if it's not too much trouble. (your diagram comment is what caused me to ask... don't bail on me like Atomic did in the glaze topic ha ha ha )
As a new potter (it will be a year this mothers day) I completely appreciate all of your advice, I know I make a lot of bone headed rookie mistakes, and it's nice to have a team to tell me about it.
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#5 TJR

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 06:54 PM

Rebbylicious;
One trick some potters do to get a sharp edge on the spout is to wax the very end.[just the flat edge]. Then it is sharper. This is a bit of a pain to do, and an extra step, so I don't bother.
The angle of spout should be about 45 degrees.
TJR.

#6 Mark C.

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 07:38 PM

One way to think about this think about a drop of water as it rolls off something.
The sharp edge makes water roll one way or the other
The rounded edge allows a drop to go over the edge
This rounded edge can be from over soothed clay or thick glaze both can allow water to drip down.
A sharp edge as well as a thin glaze makes for the drip to go back down the spout not over the spout down the neck.
If it drips after glaze firing try the little bit of butter on underside of spout to reduce surface tension and back drip.
a Few other notes on spouts-remember if they are thrown spouts and you cut them at a angle they will untwist some during a glaze fire which can change the angle.
This is all learned over time and will take time to learn.
Mark
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#7 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 07:53 PM

I just use my finger and sort of pull the spot like a handle to get a nice bend and finish by sharpening the low side of the spout.
I clean the glaze off a little bit on the sharp edge to stop the drip. It also helps if the shape of the pot flows into the spot and if the spot starts low on the belly of the pot and ends above the level of the lid. It should not end below the level of the lid or you can't fill up the pot with tea.
It all works together to function well. Looking forward to the pictures.
Marcia

#8 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 10:09 PM

I just use my finger and sort of pull the spot like a handle to get a nice bend and finish by sharpening the low side of the spout.
I clean the glaze off a little bit on the sharp edge to stop the drip. It also helps if the shape of the pot flows into the spot and if the spot starts low on the belly of the pot and ends above the level of the lid. It should not end below the level of the lid or you can't fill up the pot with tea.
It all works together to function well. Looking forward to the pictures.
Marcia


do you have any pictures of your pulled spout? Sounds very cool!
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#9 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:26 AM

http://ceramicartsda...ewimage&img=772
Not the best example right now as I only have my iPad. this one is in my gallery under yellow glaze. The spout is altered by pulling it like a handle and bending it with a finger.
marcia

#10 OffCenter

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:55 AM

http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2547

This cone 12 anagama teapot poured like a dream until I broke the handle. Now it is full of bluebird eggs due to hatch any day now.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#11 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 09:40 AM

http://ceramicartsda...wimage&img=2547

This cone 12 anagama teapot poured like a dream until I broke the handle. Now it is full of bluebird eggs due to hatch any day now.

Jim


How cool and innovative!
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#12 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 09:41 AM

http://ceramicartsda...ewimage&img=772
Not the best example right now as I only have my iPad. this one is in my gallery under yellow glaze. The spout is altered by pulling it like a handle and bending it with a finger.
marcia


Wow- what a smooth/flowy aesthetic!
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#13 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 09:43 AM

Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.

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#14 TJR

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 09:55 AM

Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.


Hey,there;
A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.
TJR.Posted Image

#15 OffCenter

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 09:57 AM

Nice first teapot. The handle looks good and while it's nice to have a locking lid, most teapots require that you keep one hand on the lid as you pour. I don't know how well it pours but even if it pours well the spout needs work. All you need to do is look at lots of teapots and practice. Good job!

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#16 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 10:11 AM


Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.


Hey,there;
A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.
TJR.Posted Image


Thanks for that! When I was making my teapot I was just looking at Google images to get inspiration, I did the "bulb" type spout because I saw a lot of them and thought they looked cool, but I guess I was looking at faulty pots LOL!! It would help if I look at work from respected potters to learn from!
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#17 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 10:12 AM

Nice first teapot. The handle looks good and while it's nice to have a locking lid, most teapots require that you keep one hand on the lid as you pour. I don't know how well it pours but even if it pours well the spout needs work. All you need to do is look at lots of teapots and practice. Good job!

Jim


Thanks! I am going to practice making spouts (and lids that don't fall off quite as easily)
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#18 OffCenter

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 10:29 AM



Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.


Hey,there;
A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.
TJR.Posted Image


Thanks for that! When I was making my teapot I was just looking at Google images to get inspiration, I did the "bulb" type spout because I saw a lot of them and thought they looked cool, but I guess I was looking at faulty pots LOL!! It would help if I look at work from respected potters to learn from!


I don't think you're going to find any respected potters here. Lark Publishing's "500 Teapots" is a start.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#19 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 10:34 AM




Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.


Hey,there;
A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.
TJR.Posted Image


Thanks for that! When I was making my teapot I was just looking at Google images to get inspiration, I did the "bulb" type spout because I saw a lot of them and thought they looked cool, but I guess I was looking at faulty pots LOL!! It would help if I look at work from respected potters to learn from!


I don't think you're going to find any respected potters here. Lark Publishing's "500 Teapots" is a start.

Jim


you are too funny! But i will check out the book


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#20 gypsy

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 12:27 PM





Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.


Hey,there;
A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.
TJR.Posted Image


Thanks for that! When I was making my teapot I was just looking at Google images to get inspiration, I did the "bulb" type spout because I saw a lot of them and thought they looked cool, but I guess I was looking at faulty pots LOL!! It would help if I look at work from respected potters to learn from!


I don't think you're going to find any respected potters here. Lark Publishing's "500 Teapots" is a start.

Jim


you are too funny! But i will check out the book



I think it is a lovely tea pot and love the glaze.




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