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Stoneware matte clear crackle glaze


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#1 gypsy

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 08:28 PM

I have Mayco clear matte crackle glaze. I don't know how to use it. Do I use it by itself over white clay bisque or can I use it over another glaze color to make that color crackle? Please help on this one. Thank you.

#2 Denice

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 08:47 PM

I assume this glaze is low fire, most crackles are you can use it over bisque or bisque with underglazes. We always stained our crackle with India ink or strong coffee, there are other ways to stain it. I would wait a least a week before staining sometimes it takes a while to finish crackling. It's been 30 years since I worked with crackle glazes there might be some new techniques out there. Denice

#3 gypsy

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 09:04 PM

I assume this glaze is low fire, most crackles are you can use it over bisque or bisque with underglazes. We always stained our crackle with India ink or strong coffee, there are other ways to stain it. I would wait a least a week before staining sometimes it takes a while to finish crackling. It's been 30 years since I worked with crackle glazes there might be some new techniques out there. Denice


Thank you. This crackle is cone 6. can I put it over a colored glaze to get crackles in that color?

#4 bciskepottery

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 09:16 PM

Sounds like test tiles are in order . . . the Mayco site says it can be applied to bisqued wares, does not mention being applied over another glaze. When combining two glazes, you end up with a new third glaze . . . whose characteristics will be a combination of the two. It might crackle; it might not. No way to predict results.

#5 gypsy

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 10:04 PM

That means it will be crackle over bare clay....wouldn't that be ugly?

#6 weeble

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 03:27 AM

I've used several crackle glazes over other glazes, and you DO have to do test tiles. Sometimes the interaction between the two glazes is... unfortunate! Frequently you'll loose the crackle, particularly over glossy glazes.

As an alternative, you can add colorant to your clay body, such as mason stains, then use the crackle glaze over. That works well, or decorate your base with colored slips. You'll have to do tests any way you go!

Another idea, if you use something to 'pop' the crackle, you can use something with color on a white clay to get a fine spider web of color. Sharpie markers work, but the color isn't as permanent as I like.
Maryjane Carlson

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#7 Biglou13

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 08:37 AM

That means it will be crackle over bare clay....wouldn't that be ugly?


The studio clear where I'm at rarely ever fits the clay I'm using, and I frequently get crackle or crazing. I wouldn't call it ugly. I like the crazing . It's a little boring over white clay. But excels over slip covered, and darker clay bodies,. Most people like the crazing, many say it makes piece feel aged.
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#8 OffCenter

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 09:08 AM

That means it will be crackle over bare clay....wouldn't that be ugly?


On thick over porcelain, probably not. If you mixed your own glazes all you would have to do is add 0.5% copper carb and apply the glaze thickly to probably get a nice cone 6 crackle glaze. You could even try testing an ounce of your commercial glaze with a very little pinch of copper carb if you have access to any.

Jim
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#9 gypsy

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 01:13 PM

So its better to put crackle clear over under glazes then other glazes? I never used clear glazes but always thought they went over glazes tp give them a sheen. I must be wrong.

#10 OffCenter

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 03:45 PM

So its better to put crackle clear over under glazes then other glazes? I never used clear glazes but always thought they went over glazes tp give them a sheen. I must be wrong.


Usually better to use them alone. May want to feather in another glaze with fine spray.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#11 Biglou13

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:24 PM

That means it will be crackle over bare clay....wouldn't that be ugly?


Detail of crazing/ crackle on dark body clay

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#12 gypsy

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 08:00 PM

I like that.

#13 Nat

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 12:00 PM

You can use a crackle glaze over underglaze, but as you have a stoneware crackle glaze, you might lose some colour from your underglazes unless they specifically fire to high temps. I can fire my underglazes to stoneware temps but the colours often fade, still nice colours, just not what you're expecting.




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