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Dinah

Juried Shows

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Dinah    6

We all have entered juried shows and are elated when we're notified to participate. The flip side of the coin is will my entry fee be akin to burning $35 bucks in the middle of the road because they've only got room for 35 potters. How does one plan and determine one's fate? For me it's been about even odds the past few years. But, because of what I deem The Tingle Factor, applying to International or Regional juried shows, one just does. Is it just a lottery or aside from squeakingly good images of work, reading through the application form about 4 times to glean each nuance and stipulation, and Googling the Jurors to see if one's work will resonate :lol:/> , what else is there to do? It's so crucial to keep one's Resume fresh and up-to-date with peer approval. What do you do?

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OffCenter    82

We all have entered juried shows and are elated when we're notified to participate. The flip side of the coin is will my entry fee be akin to burning $35 bucks in the middle of the road because they've only got room for 35 potters. How does one plan and determine one's fate? For me it's been about even odds the past few years. But, because of what I deem The Tingle Factor, applying to International or Regional juried shows, one just does. Is it just a lottery or aside from squeakingly good images of work, reading through the application form about 4 times to glean each nuance and stipulation, and Googling the Jurors to see if one's work will resonate laugh.gif/> , what else is there to do? It's so crucial to keep one's Resume fresh and up-to-date with peer approval. What do you do?

 

 

Make sure the show is worth entering. Don't waste time and money entering a show that is obscure and/or will not get any publicity. Don't enter a show that is juried by an unknown potter. If you're not familar with him/her, you should be able to look them up and decide if they are worthy of being a judge. You may not like their work but they may still be worthy of judging a show. Beware of new shows. Some are simply scams to get you to send them 35 bucks. If you decide the show is on the level and prestigious enough to be worth entering and the judge is worthy of judging a show then you have to look at what has been accepted to that show before and, most importantly, judge the judge. Has he/she done a good job judging other shows? Is he/she really good or just someone who has become well known because he/she's pushy and fooled a lot of people or has taught ceramics so long that he/she is hard to ignore? In other words, is this person good enough to judge your work? Finally, you have to figure your chances with this judge. You can't always tell what they'll pick by their work. Many go out of their way to avoid picking work that is similar to theirs. (Some don't, though. I had a student win first place in the Jewish Community Center Show in Denver (a fairly prestigious show) sometime around 1975 because I knew the judge always picked work that was like his so we studied his work and she made lots of pots like his and won.)

 

Good luck.

 

Jim

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AtomicAxe    19

I dislike most juried shows since the cost almost never equates to an increase in notoriety or sales unless you get 'best in show' from a notable judge in a show that does have some sort of media presence. Most don't even know how to use e-mail let alone know how to tell even local media sources like news papers and weekly event magazines that they are doing anything AT ALL. And don't even get me started with lack of even press releases or post jury updates. You want better reception and professional impression with the public ... get your work into a gallery, make sure you write a press release to the opening reception that gets published in local media and make sure you have a strong web presence ... easier than juried shows with better results and you MIGHT even sell some work which would make it worth it even in the short run.

 

I do find them good to test out experimental works to see if they get into shows, let alone try to place in the show ... but I've found that larger work always beats smaller works ... so stick to submitting up to the maximum size.

 

 

I mean hell, I found one show that gave participation certificates to everyone complete with little golden stars on it ... so yeah ... not a fan.

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GEP    863

I agree with Atomic ... the cost and time spent on juried shows does not return enough value.

 

I only apply for these very rarely, when it makes sense. For example, I assign my advanced students to apply for Strictly Functional every year, so I do it too. Sometimes I'll apply for shows at Baltimore Clayworks, because they are local to me, and I want to support them. But it's not about my resume, or peer approval, and definitely not about moolah.

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Matt Oz    67

It must depend on where you live, because in Michigan a lot of the good shows (as in high attendance and sales) are the juried shows. Of course we have a decent amount of moderate to very large shows like Ann Arbor. So its well worth the jury fee.

 

 

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GEP    863

It must depend on where you live, because in Michigan a lot of the good shows (as in high attendance and sales) are the juried shows. Of course we have a decent amount of moderate to very large shows like Ann Arbor. So its well worth the jury fee.

 

 

Oh I thought we we talking about juried gallery exhibitions, not art festivals. Yes a good art festival is worth way more than a gallery exhibition!

 

Mea

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Matt Oz    67

It must depend on where you live, because in Michigan a lot of the good shows (as in high attendance and sales) are the juried shows. Of course we have a decent amount of moderate to very large shows like Ann Arbor. So its well worth the jury fee.

 

 

Oh I thought we we talking about juried gallery exhibitions, not art festivals. Yes a good art festival is worth way more than a gallery exhibition!

 

Mea

 

 

Maybe I'm confused?

 

 

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OffCenter    82

but I've found that larger work always beats smaller works ... so stick to submitting up to the maximum size.

 

 

 

I don't agree. When I first started back potting a few years ago, the first show I entered and was accepted for was Strictly Functional. The piece was a cup. After that my teabowls and cups were accepted (and sometimes picked up an award or two) in several very good shows. As a matter of fact, when I decided to enter a huge anagama fired jar in the Strictly Functional that Jack Troy judged, it was my first large piece entered in that show and first rejection in that show.

 

Jim

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TJR    359

I'm thinking that you are talking about a juried art show, not a craft fair, which is a different kettle of fish.I used to enter the provincial juried craft show[not fair], everyyear, and would get in every year. The catch was that you had to be a member of the craft council, which was a $200.00 hit. The shows were themed,like an Italian show, or all about vessels to hold candles. I did win a few awards, and then thought as I reached around to pat myself on the back that this was a piece of cake. That's when I started to not get into those shows. Over the past few years, I haven't renewed my membership to that organization. You are right, it was like burning money in the road. In my case, it was $200.00 beaners.

I am at the point in my career where I don't need to add to my resume, and I sell all my work from my studio.

Juried shows have value, but like the previous posters have said, they have to be reputable and of benefit to your career.

TJR.

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Matt Oz    67

Okay it all makes sense now.

 

I never considered entering one of those shows, seems a little odd to have to pay to be judged. If the show instantly put you on the map or had great cash prizes, maybe it's worth it, but I'd rather have customer feedback.

 

 

 

 

 

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OffCenter    82

Okay it all makes sense now.

 

I never considered entering one of those shows, seems a little odd to have to pay to be judged. If the show instantly put you on the map or had great cash prizes, maybe it's worth it, but I'd rather have customer feedback.

 

 

 

 

It depends. A lot of them are a waste of time and money but the good ones like Strictly Functional gets you into galleries and shows.

 

Jim

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Mark C.    1,801

We all have entered juried shows and are elated when we're notified to participate. The flip side of the coin is will my entry fee be akin to burning $35 bucks in the middle of the road because they've only got room for 35 potters. How does one plan and determine one's fate? For me it's been about even odds the past few years. But, because of what I deem The Tingle Factor, applying to International or Regional juried shows, one just does. Is it just a lottery or aside from squeakingly good images of work, reading through the application form about 4 times to glean each nuance and stipulation, and Googling the Jurors to see if one's work will resonate laugh.gif/> , what else is there to do? It's so crucial to keep one's Resume fresh and up-to-date with peer approval. What do you do?

 

 

I think its always appropriate to ask questions.

As far as the final out come of these shows towards self enhancement-thats an open debate

I think it depends on what you want-building a name for yourself or fatting ones resume or building self confidence

 

For me none of it adds up at this point in my life-my markets are somewhat fixed and I have more demand that I can fill so sending off work and checks does not add up-I'd rather burn the bills in the road.

Mark

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Matt Oz    67

Okay it all makes sense now.

 

I never considered entering one of those shows, seems a little odd to have to pay to be judged. If the show instantly put you on the map or had great cash prizes, maybe it's worth it, but I'd rather have customer feedback.

 

 

 

 

It depends. A lot of them are a waste of time and money but the good ones like Strictly Functional gets you into galleries and shows.

 

Jim

 

Good to know, I see they have a decent web site too.

 

 

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OffCenter    82

Okay it all makes sense now.

 

I never considered entering one of those shows, seems a little odd to have to pay to be judged. If the show instantly put you on the map or had great cash prizes, maybe it's worth it, but I'd rather have customer feedback.

 

 

 

 

It depends. A lot of them are a waste of time and money but the good ones like Strictly Functional gets you into galleries and shows.

 

Jim

 

 

 

Good to know, I see they have a decent web site too.

 

 

 

 

Used to be. They've taken down all the shows except the last one, number 20. I hope it is just a temp thing because being able to check out all the shows and refer people to the shows that include your work was the best thing about the site.

 

Jim

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AtomicAxe    19

but I've found that larger work always beats smaller works ... so stick to submitting up to the maximum size.

 

 

 

I don't agree. When I first started back potting a few years ago, the first show I entered and was accepted for was Strictly Functional. The piece was a cup. After that my teabowls and cups were accepted (and sometimes picked up an award or two) in several very good shows. As a matter of fact, when I decided to enter a huge anagama fired jar in the Strictly Functional that Jack Troy judged, it was my first large piece entered in that show and first rejection in that show.

 

Jim

 

 

Ahh, see now that is my blind spot ... strictly functional shows ... national is never on my want to do list and anything regionally or locally has never been around. So with that, yeah ... the size would be different, judges would probably look more for perfection in the small vs validation in the size. Everything else though I've been to ... you could almost point out who was going to be placed in a show by how expensive their frame was and how big the piece was ... rest really didn't matter.

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OffCenter    82

but I've found that larger work always beats smaller works ... so stick to submitting up to the maximum size.

 

 

 

I don't agree. When I first started back potting a few years ago, the first show I entered and was accepted for was Strictly Functional. The piece was a cup. After that my teabowls and cups were accepted (and sometimes picked up an award or two) in several very good shows. As a matter of fact, when I decided to enter a huge anagama fired jar in the Strictly Functional that Jack Troy judged, it was my first large piece entered in that show and first rejection in that show.

 

Jim

 

 

Ahh, see now that is my blind spot ... strictly functional shows ... national is never on my want to do list and anything regionally or locally has never been around. So with that, yeah ... the size would be different, judges would probably look more for perfection in the small vs validation in the size. Everything else though I've been to ... you could almost point out who was going to be placed in a show by how expensive their frame was and how big the piece was ... rest really didn't matter.

 

 

Not really talking about just functional shows. The Strictly Functional just happens to be one of--or probably the--best pottery show every year. Most other shows aren't restricted to functional ceramics and even Strictly Functional often pushes the limits of functional. Since I hardly ever frame any of my pottery, I'll take your word on shows that favor expensive frames and size.

 

Jim

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