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#1 Potterylady

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 07:37 AM

I am looking to purchase a wheel electric. Please let me know what you think of this one or any suggestions. I have opportunity to purchase a "" speedball elite 1 hp brand new never used with the regular table top not the large table $550"

I should add I just retired, so this is something I will be doing as a hobby, I've taken studio classes many times over the past 40 yrs. and enjoyed it.

#2 GMosko

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 08:16 AM

I know you are concerned about cost. Excuse me, but the absolute most important thing to me is longevity and ease of operation. A wheel that lasts for twenty years will cost less than a cheaper wheel that goes bad after three years. Therefore, the only choice I can possibly make is the Thomas Stuart wheel from Shimpo. I have owned a Soldner kick, a Lockerbie motor-assisted kick, and a Brent 3/4 horse electric. While I loved all of them, the Thomas Stuart has shown me a problem-free life for twelve years--so far. I expect it to last until I am in the ground.
Gil Mosko

#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 08:34 AM

I think another consideration is comfort for your body. You don't want to development chronic back pain. Go find a showroom and test drive some wheels. See what fits or war can be adjusted to fit your specific body needs as well as your output needs.

Marcia

#4 Chris Throws Pots

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 08:46 AM

Hi Potterylady,

Gil raises a very good point. If you have to buy a replacement wheel after a few years, you really haven't saved money. You've bought a headache... two potentially.

My initial thought is that if you are truly in need of a full horsepower motor on your wheel, you should not be seeking a bargain. My understanding of higher horsepower on different wheels is primarily there for centering weight capacity. If you are putting your wheel under the strain of centering 100+ pounds, I would encourage you to invest in a higher end product.

If cost is the most important factor: I can't speak to the Speedball wheels, but I can point you in the direction of a Pacifica GT400. It is about $150 more and a half horse less than the Speedball version you're currently considering. We have 12 of these at my studio. Under HEAVY daily use by hundreds of students and professional potters alike, these tend to hold up for about 8 years. If you're buying strictly for personal use, it should live a lot longer than that.

The GT400 is certainly not as nice of a wheel as the Brent CXC or the VL Whisper we also have at the studio, or my Soldner S Series that I have at home, but for the price it could be a good fit for you.

Good Luck!

Chris

Christopher Vaughn Pottery
Functional stoneware forms
handcrafted in Burlington, Vermont

 

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#5 Potterylady

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:08 AM

THANK YOU, GMosko, Marcia and Chris, for your information.


Sorry new to this site, I should have given more info. about my needs.

I just retired, so this is something I will be doing as a hobby, I've taken studio classes many times on and off over the past 40 yrs. and loved it, I'm not good but hope that practice will help. Moved to NC and cannot find a studio nearby.

I don't plan on making anything very large or heavy. I thought this might be a good starting wheel and see if I'm spending my time doing this and than move up to a Thomas Stuart which is my first choice.


Mary


#6 Mark C.

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 03:34 PM

I just cannot recommend this wheel as its on the bottom end for me.
I would spend some time looking for a used wheel thats better quaility for less money
Used wheels are usually just fine and about 2/3 less cost.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#7 OffCenter

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 03:53 PM

Go with brands that have a good reputation like Soldner, Brent, Thomas Stuart, and Shimpo. Buying a cheap wheel is just asking for trouble.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#8 neilestrick

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 03:57 PM

Around here (Chicago area) used wheels are hard to find. And most that do show up are really old, need quite a bit of maintenance, and are overpriced. In my experience, most good used wheels go to someone without ever being advertised. Get a good new wheel. It will be the only wheel you'll ever need to buy. No sense throwing your money at something just to replace it later. Save another $300 and get the TS you want.
Neil Estrick
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Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
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#9 Strelnikov

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 10:15 PM

Around here (Chicago area) used wheels are hard to find. And most that do show up are really old, need quite a bit of maintenance, and are overpriced. In my experience, most good used wheels go to someone without ever being advertised. Get a good new wheel. It will be the only wheel you'll ever need to buy. No sense throwing your money at something just to replace it later. Save another $300 and get the TS you want.


My wife and I also live in the Chicago area. We were faced with the same dilemma. We ended up buying a new Skutt wheel (their cheapest model) and have been very happy with it.

#10 Frederik-W

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:21 AM


You can of course, make beautiful round pots without a wheel.
You use coils and hand-build them.
It is still done in e.g. many parts of Africa, where people make absolutely stunning pots, big and small.
Hand-built pots often look better than a lot of pots that I have seen that are made on a wheel.
(and if I step on some toes here, so be it).
I have made some hand-built pots myself and I found it a very rewarding experience.


Image below is kindly used from the site of: Missionnaires d'Afrique, http://www.mafrome.org/batwa_elias.htm

Posted Image

#11 Frankiegirl

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:44 AM

I always liked Brent wheels but they are pricy. Someone mentioned getting one used. I wouldn't. Wheels retain their value really well but that can work against you because even an older, cheaper or broken wheel can sell higher priced. High price doesn't always mean quality. I would get a new one and get what you can afford. When you decide, look at the HP (1 HP is the minimum I would get), splash pan (how durable and easy for your style of throwing/cleaning), the foot controls (are they sturdy and smooth), does it have a reverse switch (if you throw clockwise). Are their any other things you need it to do? The brand I trust and buy for myself are Bailey wheels. I find them similar to Brent quality and they are much more affordable. They have lots of options too. Someone mentioned testing out some wheels, that is a great idea. Good Luck!




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