Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

One more on glass infused pottery


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 cstovin

cstovin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 76 posts

Posted 16 April 2013 - 11:30 PM

I went back and looked at all the sites/information that you all suggested, but there still isn't much information about how to go about this. I am really surprised that there aren't more people trying this, or that there isn't more information about this type of pottery and the process? I tried to find a book maybe on amazon, and no luck there either :)


What I am looking at doing is something inspiring like (www.palomapottery.com) - I don't want to copy her, but when I was thinking about wanting to add glass to my items, that was kind of the look I was imaging - not marbles, solid large pieces of glass, special glass....she does what I wanted to try - uses recycled glass - so there must be a way? I can't afford to blow up my kiln, and I just need a place to start?

Any ideas or suggestions on how to get started down this road would be appreciated -

Thanks!

Charlene

#2 Pompots

Pompots

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 17 April 2013 - 12:38 AM

There is no much science about adding glass to your pottery, it is all about testing, I'm doing this too with wall pieces (see my gallery) but I learned through testing, basically is all about to put the crushed glass (frit) on the indentations and fire it, (cone 04 wont melt the glass) you don't want to overflow the indentation with glass. the color of the glass is not always what you expect to get, some glasses are pretty much what you see is what you get, but not all of them, specially the reds and yellows. those are hard to get. brown, green and blue are pretty straight forward, other options is glazing your pieces or not, you need to test how the glass is going to interact with your glaze, sometimes there is a halo on the edges of the glass, sometimes the glaze just runs down into the indentation leaving the color of the clay exposed. make small testing bowls put your glass on them and fire them. glaze some and other leave them unglazed, that is the only way you are going to learn how to do it.

#3 cstovin

cstovin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 76 posts

Posted 17 April 2013 - 12:43 AM

Don't get me wrong, I know I am going to need to test and develop my own practice and process - I just don't know anything about it.....I am new to glass, (don't know anything about that either)...other than some glasses don't mix well, and all are not created equal - so I guess I know a little.


I know when I slump my glass I slump it sometimes at come 015 and sometimes at cone 014; I know from the previous post now it will have to be fired hotter, but it just seems like there would be a little more starting information out there-

C.

#4 Pompots

Pompots

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 17 April 2013 - 01:59 AM

Don't get me wrong, I know I am going to need to test and develop my own practice and process - I just don't know anything about it.....I am new to glass, (don't know anything about that either)...other than some glasses don't mix well, and all are not created equal - so I guess I know a little.


I know when I slump my glass I slump it sometimes at come 015 and sometimes at cone 014; I know from the previous post now it will have to be fired hotter, but it just seems like there would be a little more starting information out there-

C.


Probably if you are more specific I can answer some of your questions, as I mentioned above I have been doing this combination clay glass for a while now and i have a pretty understanding of it. I fire my glass at cone 5.

#5 Denice

Denice

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 673 posts
  • LocationWichita, Kansas

Posted 17 April 2013 - 08:29 AM

I haven't done any glass ceramic combo's for 30 years but I started out by learning about glass and went from there. I bought a new book recently called Warm Glass it gives you a lot of info on working with and firing different glasses. I was wanting to make a large glass art piece with recycled glass but had read that bottle glass had more chemicals in them than 30 years ago and was harder to work with so I decided to start researching. I still would like a book on working with recycled glass but the Warm Glass book is a good start. Denice

#6 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,176 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 17 April 2013 - 09:46 AM

You might be Googling the wrong term ... If you try "melting glass on pottery" you get a lot of hits ... I think 'infusing' is the term that is limiting your hits.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#7 potterbeth

potterbeth

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30 posts

Posted 17 April 2013 - 10:10 AM

I have had students experiment with melting glass onto their clay work at cone 6 electric. Most have used glass beads available at craft stores. Some retain color, some do not. Combining the glass with glaze can affect results. In 30+ years, every piece of glass I've seen fired to cone 6 has been fully melted.

ALL of the melted glass flows to the lowest point possible where it is positioned on the piece. If you look at the Paloma Pottery work, the glass is incorporated in areas where it will pool and be contained, otherwise the melted glass will run off of the piece. Gravity always wins.

Also note the crazing in the glass on the Paloma Pottery work. If the melted glass is not annealed, it will crackle. You have to decide how much you can tolerate and whether or not this is a concern for work going to the public.

A note about using glass beads, they can roll around during the firing. An air current does develop inside an electric kiln above a certain temperature. One student making small clay pendants incorporating glass beads had to make trays with short sides to protect the work, plus the beads were held in place for loading with a small amount of Elmer's glue. Note that the glue burns off early in the firing, gravity still wins.

#8 cstovin

cstovin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 76 posts

Posted 17 April 2013 - 03:51 PM

Thank you, PomPots, I will get my questions together and post them.....most of the items I do now are decorative, so crazing isn't too much of a concern for me now; but I just wanted to get more information and can't find much! Will try the search terms you suggested also -

C.

#9 Pompots

Pompots

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 104 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 17 April 2013 - 07:55 PM

Thank you, PomPots, I will get my questions together and post them.....most of the items I do now are decorative, so crazing isn't too much of a concern for me now; but I just wanted to get more information and can't find much! Will try the search terms you suggested also -

C.


You are welcome. try this link and see if they have the info you need.
http://www.lakesidep...ery-ceramic.htm

#10 AtomicAxe

AtomicAxe

    Skilled Mud Bug

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 192 posts
  • LocationAmarillo, TX

Posted 17 April 2013 - 08:57 PM

I went back and looked at all the sites/information that you all suggested, but there still isn't much information about how to go about this. I am really surprised that there aren't more people trying this, or that there isn't more information about this type of pottery and the process? I tried to find a book maybe on amazon, and no luck there either Posted Image


What I am looking at doing is something inspiring like (www.palomapottery.com) - I don't want to copy her, but when I was thinking about wanting to add glass to my items, that was kind of the look I was imaging - not marbles, solid large pieces of glass, special glass....she does what I wanted to try - uses recycled glass - so there must be a way? I can't afford to blow up my kiln, and I just need a place to start?

Any ideas or suggestions on how to get started down this road would be appreciated -

Thanks!

Charlene


that is just flat pieces with an impression to catch the glass. the person uses a glaze layer to make sure it doesn't shiver off but most likely just uses glass reclaimed from bottles. glaze color changes the glass so the person probably only uses clear, blue and green glass to get all the effects.

Nothing special really. just experiment and remember the rule of glass, it always wants to flow to the floor. if you can pulverize glass to a powder you can stablize it somewhat with feldspar and ball clay ... but not needed since what you are going for is neither food safe or funtional so keep to decorative design.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users