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#1 Pompots

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:27 PM

I started to throw a pot and it collapsed on me, I really like the way it looks this way and i have plans for it, the bottom still really thick, so I need to trim some out, my question is How do I trim this, I dont have a Chuck big enough for it, any ideas?
Thanks, and may the clay Gods be with you.

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#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:49 PM

It is easy to throw a chuck big enough ... you don't have to fire it or take it off the wheel ... just let it harden enough to support your form and make sure your other piece's bottom stays moist enough to trim.

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#3 Biglou13

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:50 PM

Keep pot moist .

Make a bigger chuck.

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#4 OffCenter

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 04:53 PM

I started to throw a pot and it collapsed on me, I really like the way it looks this way and i have plans for it, the bottom still really thick, so I need to trim some out, my question is How do I trim this, I dont have a Chuck big enough for it, any ideas?
Thanks, and may the clay Gods be with you.


Throw a chuck like Chris said but don't wait for it to harden. Instead put plastic wrap over the wet clay. The wet clay is easy to mold around the piece being trimmed and when done it's ready to be wedged up.

Jim
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#5 Chris Campbell

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 05:23 PM


I started to throw a pot and it collapsed on me, I really like the way it looks this way and i have plans for it, the bottom still really thick, so I need to trim some out, my question is How do I trim this, I dont have a Chuck big enough for it, any ideas?
Thanks, and may the clay Gods be with you.


Throw a chuck like Chris said but don't wait for it to harden. Instead put plastic wrap over the wet clay. The wet clay is easy to mold around the piece being trimmed and when done it's ready to be wedged up.

Jim


Brilliant!!Posted Image

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#6 mregecko

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 06:12 PM

I started to throw a pot and it collapsed on me, I really like the way it looks this way and i have plans for it, the bottom still really thick, so I need to trim some out, my question is How do I trim this, I dont have a Chuck big enough for it, any ideas?
Thanks, and may the clay Gods be with you.


I actually trim things upright pretty often... Especially when I don't have the right-sized chuck and don't want to use a ton of clay to make one.

You need a non-absorbant bat, and just a little bit of water on the bat (I usually just wipe it with a sopping sponge).

Level the bottom of the pot as much as you can, and then (with both hands) rub it in small circles on the bat+water. A lot of people use this technique to smooth out / level the bottom of pots.

If you keep at it, there will be a point where the clay absorbs most of the water and adheres to the bat. It will become VERY hard to move, but you can still do small adjustments to center it.

I trim it upright like this, and then do any finishing on the bottom by hand... Carving out any extra clay on the bottom by hand with foam and a banding wheel.

#7 Pompots

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 07:24 PM

Thanks Everyone for your input, both are great ideas, Thanks a lot for your help. I think i might try the upright trimming sounds like the fastest way since the clay is at the right time to trim.
You all are awesome and may the clay Gods be with you.

Pompeyo.

#8 Pompots

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 12:57 AM


I started to throw a pot and it collapsed on me, I really like the way it looks this way and i have plans for it, the bottom still really thick, so I need to trim some out, my question is How do I trim this, I dont have a Chuck big enough for it, any ideas?
Thanks, and may the clay Gods be with you.


I actually trim things upright pretty often... Especially when I don't have the right-sized chuck and don't want to use a ton of clay to make one.

You need a non-absorbant bat, and just a little bit of water on the bat (I usually just wipe it with a sopping sponge).

Level the bottom of the pot as much as you can, and then (with both hands) rub it in small circles on the bat+water. A lot of people use this technique to smooth out / level the bottom of pots.

If you keep at it, there will be a point where the clay absorbs most of the water and adheres to the bat. It will become VERY hard to move, but you can still do small adjustments to center it.

I trim it upright like this, and then do any finishing on the bottom by hand... Carving out any extra clay on the bottom by hand with foam and a banding wheel.



This option worked out perfectly for me, thanks a lot. I stuck the pot directly onto the wheel head and it worked like a charm.

#9 mregecko

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 02:52 PM



I started to throw a pot and it collapsed on me, I really like the way it looks this way and i have plans for it, the bottom still really thick, so I need to trim some out, my question is How do I trim this, I dont have a Chuck big enough for it, any ideas?
Thanks, and may the clay Gods be with you.


I actually trim things upright pretty often... Especially when I don't have the right-sized chuck and don't want to use a ton of clay to make one.

You need a non-absorbant bat, and just a little bit of water on the bat (I usually just wipe it with a sopping sponge).

Level the bottom of the pot as much as you can, and then (with both hands) rub it in small circles on the bat+water. A lot of people use this technique to smooth out / level the bottom of pots.

If you keep at it, there will be a point where the clay absorbs most of the water and adheres to the bat. It will become VERY hard to move, but you can still do small adjustments to center it.

I trim it upright like this, and then do any finishing on the bottom by hand... Carving out any extra clay on the bottom by hand with foam and a banding wheel.



This option worked out perfectly for me, thanks a lot. I stuck the pot directly onto the wheel head and it worked like a charm.


So glad to hear :-) Happy potting!

#10 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 05:18 PM


I started to throw a pot and it collapsed on me, I really like the way it looks this way and i have plans for it, the bottom still really thick, so I need to trim some out, my question is How do I trim this, I dont have a Chuck big enough for it, any ideas?
Thanks, and may the clay Gods be with you.


Throw a chuck like Chris said but don't wait for it to harden. Instead put plastic wrap over the wet clay. The wet clay is easy to mold around the piece being trimmed and when done it's ready to be wedged up.

Jim


I like you more and more every time you post. This is a wonderful idea! Posted Image
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)




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