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JBaymore

What do you think of technology entering the art ceramics field? | Q.O.W. for 04/09/2013

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JBaymore    1,432

Inkjet printers with ceramic pigment cartridges. Rino 3-D Design Software hooked to a CNC machine. 3-D Digital printing direct to ceramic matrix materials. Robotic manipulation of clay (it is only a mater of time).

 

 

What do you think of high technology entering the art ceramics field?

 

Check out joining the Potters Council ( www.potterscouncil.org ) for more networking possibilities, peer mentoring opportunities, discounts on books, magazines, and DVDs, health insurance, credit card merchant programs, and many other member benefits.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Inkjet printers with ceramic pigment cartridges. Rino 3-D Design Software hooked to a CNC machine. 3-D Digital printing direct to ceramic matrix materials. Robotic manipulation of clay (it is only a mater of time).

 

 

What do you think of high technology entering the art ceramics field?

 

Check out joining the Potters Council ( www.potterscouncil.org ) for more networking possibilities, peer mentoring opportunities, discounts on books, magazines, and DVDs, health insurance, credit card merchant programs, and many other member benefits.

 

 

I saw some amazing uses of 3D printing at a couple of the NCECA shows. I think it is a new toy and will become more common as people explore its potential.

Marcia

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Biglou13    202

Can't stop the digital revolution. It will have its place. Look at where digital photography has gone. World renouned museums have digital prints in their collections. The digital work Iis beautiful.but......

 

It doesn't have the soul like old school analog eg. Film/silver gelatin fiber based prints.

 

That soulful quality.....I suppose that's why I'm so captivated by wood fired pottery.

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Pres    896

Inkjet printers with ceramic pigment cartridges. Rino 3-D Design Software hooked to a CNC machine. 3-D Digital printing direct to ceramic matrix materials. Robotic manipulation of clay (it is only a mater of time).

 

 

What do you think of high technology entering the art ceramics field?

 

Check out joining the Potters Council ( www.potterscouncil.org ) for more networking possibilities, peer mentoring opportunities, discounts on books, magazines, and DVDs, health insurance, credit card merchant programs, and many other member benefits.

 

 

I have heard this argument over the past 30 years or so. I started a computer lab with a grant for music and art back in the late 80's. We had many on the staff that did not believe in the technologies for the classroom. I saw it as a way of reaching students that did not take art, I had a lot of nerds in class! We worked with photo editors, 2D and 3D animation, and in the beginning a music teacher team taught the course, final products being computer animated movies. I have seen some amazing artists that moved their work to the digital medium and their method of working is pure magic to watch. In the world of animation, it is mostly all digital now, money, money, money. To do the stuff done today, could never be done for two reasons: tools and time. I don't believe that pottery, or sculpture is in danger, but know that hacks will copy for commercial walmart type use very soon. The world of copyright law is in for some real upturns! I would love to get my hands on a 3D printer to try out some stamp ideas, some tools thoughts, and some maquettes for planning out projects to scale. Things will change, but I'll bet potters will be around in 2525 and on!

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Benzine    609

I'm not too worried. There are already cheap, mass produced ceramics out there now, yet people still desire, more handmade, one of kind pieces.

 

There even seems to be slight movement back to traditional photography as well, for the same reasons. Yeah, some things are faster and easier, but that doesn't make them better.

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OffCenter    82

Yeah, some things are faster and easier, but that doesn't make them better.

 

 

It does if you can't tell the difference between the things that are made slower and harder and the same things made faster and easier.

 

Jim

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TJR    359

Slightly off topic, but related to Benzine and Pres's posts. I was looking for a bisqued goblet blank for a Medieval History unit I am doing. I needed 70. Went to the scrape and bake store. They were going to charge me $25.00 for each one ! I went to the dollar store. You can buy finished glass stemmed goblets for a buck. I also found 3 inch in diameter terracotta flower pots, 3 in a pack for $2.00. I would only need 24 packs. How this relates to technology is that the world is smaller, and mass production is now rediculously cheap. I know you can't have it both ways. Inexpensive product when you choose to buy from the dollar store, and expensive product when you choose to sell your own hand made goblets.

TJR.

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Chris Campbell    1,081

Those thoughts are often on my mind too ... I bought a bag full of sandbox toys for $13 at Target and get to wondering how much some person made who was running the machine ... then read an article about how the most significant social/financial event currently happening is the growth of a middle class in Africa and the Third World because of manufacturing for the wealthier nations.

The younger generations still like handmade, they just don't care in the same way about who did it. In twenty years, will they care how?

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OffCenter    82

In twenty years, will they care how?

 

 

I hope not. I don't. I judge an object by the object, NOT by who made it, how, or where. Judging a art object by how it was made or where or by whom is like judging a person by who his/her parents are, what their social status, or how much money they have instead of getting to know the person.

 

Jim

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OffCenter    82

I think technology is great, but nothing compares with something made by hand.

 

 

Actually, anything compares with something made by hand. Sometimes it is better and sometime it isn't.

 

Jim

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trina    20

I think technology is great, but nothing compares with something made by hand.

 

 

Actually, anything compares with something made by hand. Sometimes it is better and sometime it isn't.

 

Jim

 

 

sometimes i feel like a nut and sometimes i don't. T

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Natania    6

In twenty years, will they care how?

 

 

I hope not. I don't. I judge an object by the object, now by who made it, how, or where. Judging a art object by how it was made or where or by whom is like judging a person by who his/her parents are, what their social status, or how much money they have instead of getting to know the person.

 

Jim

 

 

 

Judging an object by the materials it is made out of, and how sustainable they are, or are not, is part of being a globally and environmentally responsible consumer I believe. To really score high on my scale of successful objects, one has to work in myriad ways. I think the days of purchasing or evaluating objects at face value without a thought to who made them, under what conditions, and if they have been shipped half way around the world several times to be assembled in various countries by grossly underpaid workers are at an end. If an object is not recycle able and is disposable I think twice (although this is not perhaps the kind of objects that we were discussing in this thread). For me, aesthetic design is just part of the picture.

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JBaymore    1,432
If an object is not recycle able and is disposable I think twice (although this is not perhaps the kind of objects that we were discussing in this thread). For me, aesthetic design is just part of the picture.

 

 

There has been a very well done study that compares the "green-ness" of the reuseable ceramic mug and the disposable cup. Environmentally... the disposible comes out on top.

 

Green is not always as it seems. Lots of what I call "greenwashing" happens...... appears green but it isn't.

 

best,

 

......................john

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Natania    6
If an object is not recycle able and is disposable I think twice (although this is not perhaps the kind of objects that we were discussing in this thread). For me, aesthetic design is just part of the picture.

 

 

There has been a very well done study that compares the "green-ness" of the reuseable ceramic mug and the disposable cup. Environmentally... the disposible comes out on top.

 

Green is not always as it seems. Lots of what I call "greenwashing" happens...... appears green but it isn't.

 

best,

 

......................john

 

 

 

 

Good point, although I guess I wonder what the throw away cup is made of. Also, how many styrofoam cups does one throw away, at say 3 cups a day, before you go through a sturdy ceramic mug? However, I agree that what appears "green" at first glance often needs some analysis these days.

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JBaymore    1,432
Good point, although I guess I wonder what the throw away cup is made of. Also, how many styrofoam cups does one throw away, at say 3 cups a day, before you go through a sturdy ceramic mug?

 

http://www.pbs.org/w...up-contest.html

 

Http://www.sustainab...ecyclecosts.pdf

 

"So, what to do? The simple solution is to endeavour to use your mug more than 1,000 times, which even the studies most heavily backed by the disposable cup industry will be unable to deny is more eco-friendly (and for keen tea-drinkers, not too much of a challenge).But be warned. It might be more difficult than you think to reach your target; the average ceramic mug in the workplace is apparently only used 50 times. It's up to you to maintain a steady hand, never drop your cup and make sure, in 10 years' time, that that Global Warming (Help I'm Melting!) mug is still sitting pretty on your desk, having clocked up thousands of tea rounds."

Adharanand Finn is the author of Make a Difference at Work

 

 

 

 

There was just another recent study that showed that a an electric car is more damaging to the environment than a gas burner. You have to drive it so many miles before it is even a break even... that most peo[ple using electrics will never reach that level of total mileage to offset the CO2 generation.

 

 

 

So all is not always as it first seems. Takes a lot of research to know what is actually real.

 

 

best,

 

......................john

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OffCenter    82

In twenty years, will they care how?

 

 

I hope not. I don't. I judge an object by the object, NOT by who made it, how, or where. Judging a art object by how it was made or where or by whom is like judging a person by who his/her parents are, what their social status, or how much money they have instead of getting to know the person.

 

Jim

 

 

 

Judging an object by the materials it is made out of, and how sustainable they are, or are not, is part of being a globally and environmentally responsible consumer I believe. To really score high on my scale of successful objects, one has to work in myriad ways. I think the days of purchasing or evaluating objects at face value without a thought to who made them, under what conditions, and if they have been shipped half way around the world several times to be assembled in various countries by grossly underpaid workers are at an end. If an object is not recycle able and is disposable I think twice (although this is not perhaps the kind of objects that we were discussing in this thread). For me, aesthetic design is just part of the picture.

 

 

That's all peachy keen that you feel that way, but it has nothing to do with what I'm talking about which is appreciation of the artistic merit of an object.

 

Jim

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gluefarmseo    0

Inkjet printers with ceramic pigment cartridges. Rino 3-D Design Software hooked to a CNC machine. 3-D Digital printing direct to ceramic matrix materials. Robotic manipulation of clay (it is only a mater of time).

 

 

What do you think of high technology entering the art ceramics field?

 

Check out joining the Potters Council ( www.potterscouncil.org ) for more networking possibilities, peer mentoring opportunities, discounts on books, magazines, and DVDs, health insurance, credit card merchant programs, and many other member benefits.

 

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