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Clay & sawdust?


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#1 Biglou13

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 06:36 PM

I've been altering manufactured to clay to get away from the out of the box look, and it ads ownership to my medium/art, with much success. I' ve heard/ read where sawdust is wedged into clay.

What does this do? Technically speaking.
How does it change look or feel?
How will it afflect glaze? ( will run tests)
How much sawdust is good staring point?
I'm planning on using dust from sander so it's pretty fine.
How would coarse sawdust vs fine sawdust differ?
It will be fired cone 6 electric ox, (pending studio owner approval) however I first head of this with wood fired.

Thanks in advance for any advice, comments, answers.

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#2 AtomicAxe

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 10:30 PM

only time I have used saw dust into a clay body was when I was making water filters ... but that was to create a clay that had pockets in the body. We had a guest at my university from potters with peace that would teach places with unclean water to make them from local clays. Awesome stuff too. Ended up making some for some people who had hunting cabins out in the boonies of florida when I still lived in that part of the world.




Really though, any sort of material like saw dust most likely won't show up in the final product as it burns out and can probably make the product weaker since you have holes in the middle of the clay body. ... now embedded into the surface will create a rough texture depending on how fine the dust is ... otherwise you won't see many effects since burnout won't really trap ash so it won't affect glazing in that aspect and only surface burnout will affect the glaze by pooling so the finer the burnout ... the less you will likely see it.

#3 Benzine

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 11:25 AM

I tried using sawdust, for some pit fired pieces, as I read that it could reduce the risk for thermal shock. It didn't seem to help, but there were other factors, that contributed to the issue.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#4 Chris Campbell

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 11:29 AM

Also you need to check on what kind of wood produced the dust ... You don't want the complication of chemically treated wood.

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#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 11:41 AM

I have used sawdust to open up raku clay. It can give interesting carbon spots. I know of others who have used rice and coffee grounds (used) for interesting textures. You want something orgaic that will burn out.

Marcia

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#6 JBaymore

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 12:15 PM

You want something orgaic that will burn out.


And when you bisque... you want plenty of oxygen flowing in the kiln so that it DOES burn out.

best,

....................john

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#7 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 06:03 PM


You want something orgaic that will burn out.


And when you bisque... you want plenty of oxygen flowing in the kiln so that it DOES burn out.

best,

....................john

absolutely!!
Marcia


Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,
Montana State University-Billings

Marcia Selsor Studio in Brownsville, Texas.

http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com





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