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Materials to press into clay for random texture


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#21 Mossyrock

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 08:11 AM

One of my favorite random texture tools is a broken soft kiln brick that I 'pounce' into the clay. I turn the brick to different angles to create a different texture so it doesn't all look alike. The harder I pounce, the deeper the texture so I can vary that also. When I first started using it, I had to brush a few crumbs of the brick out of the clay, but all of the crumbles have disappeared and now it just gives great texture. It gives an aged appearance....like the clay has been sort of eaten away by time.
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#22 allen222

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 12:58 AM

I've seen clay sculptures with a pitted surface that I admire. I've read of things you can press into a clay surface to gain that look of antiquity, like rice or broken spaghetti. Can anyone suggest other materials that will burn out, but leave a more random, jagged appearance? I've read of people using dried clay bits, but would those fall out in the firing and leave pitted areas or would they simply stay in place? Jayne



Its analytical balance which are accurate and precise instruments to measure weight system.Its also require a draft-free location on a solid bench which is free of vibrations.Modern weighing balances which have built-in calibration weights to maintain its accuracy.

#23 Claypple

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 09:33 PM

Posted 22 July 2013 - 08:37 AM

weeble, on 07 Apr 2013 - 12:43 AM, said:snapback.png

Like Neil said, just about anything organic can be rolled in/burnished in/pressed in, then either removed or burned out.

 

So, if we leave the stuff in and let it burn, wouldn't it be detrimental for the elements of the kiln? 

I thought that is why we are using a sagger. I do realize the difference in amount of organic stuff we burn in sagger  and what we press into the clay, but still...

 


#24 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 09:39 PM

Have been testing materials . I really like perlite. I gently chop it in a blender to reduce the largest chunks. It is am organic material and leaves interesting pits. Rice and chopped rice, macaroni, various shaped small pasta, sawdust, grasses,cotton fabrics,nylons,. if you are worried about the elements, use a saggar,

Marcia

#25 Claypple

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 10:33 PM

So, should I worry or not?



#26 oldlady

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 10:38 PM

probably only worry if the percentage of additive outweighs the original clay body throughout the whole load being fired.  can't picture that happening.


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#27 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 06:20 AM

I haven't noticed any problems yet.
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#28 Claypple

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:48 AM

Thank you both!

Neil, what do you think?



#29 OffCenter

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 10:37 AM

So, should I worry or not?

 

No. Saggers in elect kilns do almost nothing to prevent the heavy carbon smoke from getting on the elements, so sagger firing would be more damaging to the elements than any material added to clay because, most likely, you're burning a lot more material in a sagger or saggers than the stuff you stick into clay. But, with that said, I don't think even firing two or three saggers with a couple of pounds of sawdust or coffee grounds in them is very harmful to the elements. I've been doing it for years.

 

Jim


E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#30 Claypple

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 10:47 AM

OK, thanks!



#31 kathi

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:28 PM

Chopped walnuts make a great texture.



#32 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:39 PM

Jim,
I didn't mean fire a saggar firing in the electric kiln, I meant put the clay with ingredients into a saggar if she was worried about the burnoff. Sealed saggars even aluminum saggars DO contain carbon and protect the elements according to my friend Russel who has been doing it for 20 years and not changed his elements yet.However I wouldn't put ferric chloride in an electric kiln no matter what king of saggar it was in.
Marcia

#33 OffCenter

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 08:42 AM

Jim,
I didn't mean fire a saggar firing in the electric kiln, I meant put the clay with ingredients into a saggar if she was worried about the burnoff. Sealed saggars even aluminum saggars DO contain carbon and protect the elements according to my friend Russel who has been doing it for 20 years and not changed his elements yet.However I wouldn't put ferric chloride in an electric kiln no matter what king of saggar it was in.
Marcia

 

I guess I missed your post and was just replying to Claypple. What you say above is interesting and, obviously, Russel should know what he's talking about, but I just can't imagine anything holding in all the gasses from organics without leaking or exploding. All that stuff as to go somewhere. I blew up a thick-walled sagger filled with dry coffee grounds and sawdust once when I made a tight-fitting lid to a sagger and sealed it with clay.

 

I don't think using a sagger for something with organics in it is worth the effort, even if you can make one that holds all the carbon in--which I still doubt. You probably get a lot more off-gassing from firing a bisque load of a clay like Lizella (lots of organics in it) than a clean clay with walnut shells stuck in it. And, as I said several times before, I've fired saggers that billow smoke (my kilns are outside) for years and they're still going strong. (Oh crap! I'll probably go check the kiln I'm firing today and find that two elements just burned out!)

 

Jim


E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#34 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 06:14 PM

His foil saggars are only fired to about 1094F
but they hold any carbon.

Marcia




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