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Isculpt

Materials to press into clay for random texture

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Isculpt    96

I've seen clay sculptures with a pitted surface that I admire. I've read of things you can press into a clay surface to gain that look of antiquity, like rice or broken spaghetti. Can anyone suggest other materials that will burn out, but leave a more random, jagged appearance? I've read of people using dried clay bits, but would those fall out in the firing and leave pitted areas or would they simply stay in place? Jayne

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mnnaj    3

I've used rice in a stocking to press in, but not leave in, textures. I also press in fabric, earrings, stamps, buttons, almost anything.

mnnaj

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Isculpt    96

Thanks for the suggestions. I guess I just haven't been forceful enough with my texturing tools. Rice in a stocking, huh? Gotta try that!

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weeble    5

Like Neil said, just about anything organic can be rolled in/burnished in/pressed in, then either removed or burned out. Other stuff I've used and liked (but it may HAVE to be removed before firing) includes rocks, onion bags, highly textured fabric, rope, stencils, old computer parts, scraps of packing material, old crochet doilies... your imagination is your only limit!

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OffCenter    82

Like Neil said, just about anything organic can be rolled in/burnished in/pressed in, then either removed or burned out. Other stuff I've used and liked (but it may HAVE to be removed before firing) includes rocks, onion bags, highly textured fabric, rope, stencils, old computer parts, scraps of packing material, old crochet doilies... your imagination is your only limit!

 

 

Don't forget bullets. Very unpredictable.

 

Jim

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Like Neil said, just about anything organic can be rolled in/burnished in/pressed in, then either removed or burned out. Other stuff I've used and liked (but it may HAVE to be removed before firing) includes rocks, onion bags, highly textured fabric, rope, stencils, old computer parts, scraps of packing material, old crochet doilies... your imagination is your only limit!

 

 

Don't forget bullets. Very unpredictable.

 

Jim

 

 

Bullets could be interesting. Your kiln could be your new sculptureB)src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/cool.gif">

 

Sandra

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Isculpt    96

I wasn't really looking for items that provide patterned texture -- I have a drawer or two full of those! I've seen sculptural work that looks as if it has weathered for centuries and I wondered what items could be pushed into the clay to give a deeply pitted look. I read about one sculptor who used a power hose to blast his large clay sculptures with water and thus create an ancient weathered look. That is NOT an option in my little studio! (The idea does create some comical mental pictures, though!)

Thanks, Jayne

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A friend made some lovely textured tile for her kitchen using smashed coffee beans, larger bits than coarse ground.

 

 

That is a great idea! You just gave me my inspiration for my stove back splash.

 

Thanks,

Sandra.

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ayjay    119

A friend made some lovely textured tile for her kitchen using smashed coffee beans, larger bits than coarse ground.

 

 

That is a great idea! You just gave me my inspiration for my stove back splash.

 

Thanks,

Sandra.

 

 

It'll be a pita to keep it clean.

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Claypple    29

Like Neil said, just about anything organic can be rolled in/burnished in/pressed in, then either removed or burned out. Other stuff I've used and liked (but it may HAVE to be removed before firing) includes rocks, onion bags, highly textured fabric, rope, stencils, old computer parts, scraps of packing material, old crochet doilies... your imagination is your only limit!

 

 

Don't forget bullets. Very unpredictable.

 

Jim

 

 

You know what can be even better? The $100 bills.

Like 5-6 of them to cover the whole vessel. Do not forget to put a couple inside, too.

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Wind n Wing    1

Have you given any thought to using stiff bristled brushes that you could pounce the clay with. Cheap house painting, paint brushes 2" to 4" wide work nice. I find my texture brushes in the house cleaning section of the hardware store or where ever a store (grocery or Big Box) keeps the cleaning supplies. You have quite a bit of control over where and how much texture you want. I have even used an old paint brush used for painting the house or trim that wasnt rinsed out in time and has stiffened and split in clumps for interesting texture.

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Mossyrock    29

One of my favorite random texture tools is a broken soft kiln brick that I 'pounce' into the clay. I turn the brick to different angles to create a different texture so it doesn't all look alike. The harder I pounce, the deeper the texture so I can vary that also. When I first started using it, I had to brush a few crumbs of the brick out of the clay, but all of the crumbles have disappeared and now it just gives great texture. It gives an aged appearance....like the clay has been sort of eaten away by time.

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allen222    1

I've seen clay sculptures with a pitted surface that I admire. I've read of things you can press into a clay surface to gain that look of antiquity, like rice or broken spaghetti. Can anyone suggest other materials that will burn out, but leave a more random, jagged appearance? I've read of people using dried clay bits, but would those fall out in the firing and leave pitted areas or would they simply stay in place? Jayne

 

 

 

Its analytical balance which are accurate and precise instruments to measure weight system.Its also require a draft-free location on a solid bench which is free of vibrations.Modern weighing balances which have built-in calibration weights to maintain its accuracy.

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Claypple    29

Posted 22 July 2013 - 08:37 AM



weeble, on 07 Apr 2013 - 12:43 AM, said:snapback.png




Like Neil said, just about anything organic can be rolled in/burnished in/pressed in, then either removed or burned out.




 


So, if we leave the stuff in and let it burn, wouldn't it be detrimental for the elements of the kiln? 


I thought that is why we are using a sagger. I do realize the difference in amount of organic stuff we burn in sagger  and what we press into the clay, but still...


 

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Have been testing materials . I really like perlite. I gently chop it in a blender to reduce the largest chunks. It is am organic material and leaves interesting pits. Rice and chopped rice, macaroni, various shaped small pasta, sawdust, grasses,cotton fabrics,nylons,. if you are worried about the elements, use a saggar,

 

Marcia

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