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Materials to press into clay for random texture


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#1 Isculpt

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 08:53 PM

I've seen clay sculptures with a pitted surface that I admire. I've read of things you can press into a clay surface to gain that look of antiquity, like rice or broken spaghetti. Can anyone suggest other materials that will burn out, but leave a more random, jagged appearance? I've read of people using dried clay bits, but would those fall out in the firing and leave pitted areas or would they simply stay in place? Jayne

#2 mnnaj

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 09:00 PM

I've used rice in a stocking to press in, but not leave in, textures. I also press in fabric, earrings, stamps, buttons, almost anything.
mnnaj

#3 neilestrick

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 09:18 PM

Pretty much anything organic that will burn out can be used- coffee grounds, wood shavings, seeds, etc. Rice is cheap.
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#4 Pompots

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 12:55 PM

A nice piece of bark will leave very intense imprints.

#5 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 01:15 PM

A nice piece of bark will leave very intense imprints.


Tree textures are the best, but these were made from a plaster cast of said tree.

picture 1


picture 2





#6 Isculpt

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 08:52 PM

Thanks for the suggestions. I guess I just haven't been forceful enough with my texturing tools. Rice in a stocking, huh? Gotta try that!

#7 weeble

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 02:43 AM

Like Neil said, just about anything organic can be rolled in/burnished in/pressed in, then either removed or burned out. Other stuff I've used and liked (but it may HAVE to be removed before firing) includes rocks, onion bags, highly textured fabric, rope, stencils, old computer parts, scraps of packing material, old crochet doilies... your imagination is your only limit!
Maryjane Carlson

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#8 OffCenter

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 08:34 AM

Like Neil said, just about anything organic can be rolled in/burnished in/pressed in, then either removed or burned out. Other stuff I've used and liked (but it may HAVE to be removed before firing) includes rocks, onion bags, highly textured fabric, rope, stencils, old computer parts, scraps of packing material, old crochet doilies... your imagination is your only limit!


Don't forget bullets. Very unpredictable.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#9 Sandra Jimison

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 05:55 AM


Like Neil said, just about anything organic can be rolled in/burnished in/pressed in, then either removed or burned out. Other stuff I've used and liked (but it may HAVE to be removed before firing) includes rocks, onion bags, highly textured fabric, rope, stencils, old computer parts, scraps of packing material, old crochet doilies... your imagination is your only limit!


Don't forget bullets. Very unpredictable.

Jim


Bullets could be interesting. Your kiln could be your new sculptureB)src="http://ceramicartsda...ault/cool.gif">

Sandra

#10 Pugaboo

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 07:38 AM

Just read you could use cork too and it would burn out as well.
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#11 Isculpt

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Posted 10 April 2013 - 10:17 PM

I wasn't really looking for items that provide patterned texture -- I have a drawer or two full of those! I've seen sculptural work that looks as if it has weathered for centuries and I wondered what items could be pushed into the clay to give a deeply pitted look. I read about one sculptor who used a power hose to blast his large clay sculptures with water and thus create an ancient weathered look. That is NOT an option in my little studio! (The idea does create some comical mental pictures, though!)
Thanks, Jayne

#12 Growin' Granny

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 01:56 AM

A friend made some lovely textured tile for her kitchen using smashed coffee beans, larger bits than coarse ground.

Sheila Maier


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#13 Sandra Jimison

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 06:07 AM

A friend made some lovely textured tile for her kitchen using smashed coffee beans, larger bits than coarse ground.


That is a great idea! You just gave me my inspiration for my stove back splash.

Thanks,
Sandra.

#14 ayjay

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 11:18 AM


A friend made some lovely textured tile for her kitchen using smashed coffee beans, larger bits than coarse ground.


That is a great idea! You just gave me my inspiration for my stove back splash.

Thanks,
Sandra.


It'll be a pita to keep it clean.

#15 minspargal

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 11:53 AM

A piece of pumice found on the beach or volcanic rock from the garden store.

#16 Isculpt

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 11:37 PM

Great ideas, thanks! Jayne

#17 Chantay

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Posted 14 April 2013 - 02:54 AM

RDWOLFF, very cool sculpture!
- chantay

#18 Claypple

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 07:23 PM


Like Neil said, just about anything organic can be rolled in/burnished in/pressed in, then either removed or burned out. Other stuff I've used and liked (but it may HAVE to be removed before firing) includes rocks, onion bags, highly textured fabric, rope, stencils, old computer parts, scraps of packing material, old crochet doilies... your imagination is your only limit!


Don't forget bullets. Very unpredictable.

Jim


You know what can be even better? The $100 bills.
Like 5-6 of them to cover the whole vessel. Do not forget to put a couple inside, too.

#19 Wind n Wing

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 08:29 PM

Have you given any thought to using stiff bristled brushes that you could pounce the clay with. Cheap house painting, paint brushes 2" to 4" wide work nice. I find my texture brushes in the house cleaning section of the hardware store or where ever a store (grocery or Big Box) keeps the cleaning supplies. You have quite a bit of control over where and how much texture you want. I have even used an old paint brush used for painting the house or trim that wasnt rinsed out in time and has stiffened and split in clumps for interesting texture.

#20 Claypple

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 08:59 PM

Still not as good as the $100 bills.




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