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RIO plus 3134 Ferro frit?


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#1 Biglou13

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 11:35 PM

I was using red iron oxide wash to paint under glaze......Was given some 3134 fero frit with red iron oxide mixed with water.although different from rio wash I like what it does, under Glazes, over glazes and just Alone.I've applied to both bisque and green with good results. I some times use it to sign pieces.

But as a newB I have questions regarding. ......

What is this mixture called?
What is formula to remake this?
Will this stick to kiln shelf if applied to bisque thicker than painted initials?
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#2 Mark C.

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 01:11 AM

I was using red iron oxide wash to paint under glaze......Was given some 3134 fero frit with red iron oxide mixed with water.although different from rio wash I like what it does, under Glazes, over glazes and just Alone.I've applied to both bisque and green with good results. I some times use it to sign pieces.

But as a newB I have questions regarding. ......

What is this mixture called?
What is formula to remake this?
Will this stick to kiln shelf if applied to bisque thicker than painted initials?


Heres some frit 3134 info
http://digitalfire.c...t_3134_351.html

The red Iron is also a flux
I would call it an iron wash with frit
Let see what others say.
Mark
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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#3 bciskepottery

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 05:49 AM

Alone, RIO has a melting point of 2,851 F . . . just a tad above bisque temps, cone 6 and cone 10. That is why RIO applied to leatherhard will still be powdery and will smudge after bisque. The frit lowers the melting point, allowing the RIO to adhere to bisque. RIO wash with frit is as good as name as any.

#4 Ben

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 06:32 AM

I was using red iron oxide wash to paint under glaze......Was given some 3134 fero frit with red iron oxide mixed with water.although different from rio wash I like what it does, under Glazes, over glazes and just Alone.I've applied to both bisque and green with good results. I some times use it to sign pieces.

But as a newB I have questions regarding. ......

What is this mixture called?
What is formula to remake this?
Will this stick to kiln shelf if applied to bisque thicker than painted initials?


What temp are you firing too?

#5 Biglou13

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 07:32 AM

Cone 6 or 7 , electric/ oxidation
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
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#6 John255

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 08:29 AM

Biglou13,
The usual mixture for the watery iron wash is one part 3134, four parts Rio.
You can find lots of info on this and a whole lot more on Vince Pitelka's site.
Look under "Hand-outs" Patinas and Glazes.
http://iweb.tntech.e...ndouts-info.htm
John255
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#7 AtomicAxe

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 10:30 AM

Iron wash, the 3134 is just to make the rio melt faster so it reacts with the surface with more than just a brown iron brush stroke. This also works well with your more stable glazes as well, a normal trick of some potters is to take their functional ware that is semi-matte finished to have glossy smooth rims is a mix of oxide and gerstley applied to the rim of the ware to make it melt and pull downward so on mugs can make the lip go from rough on lips to silky smooth with said gloss finish.

#8 perkolator

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 12:41 PM

I'd also call it an iron wash. Iron can be made into a wash with just water alone, but the added frit is not necessarily to make it melt "faster" - the flux is mainly to fuse it to the surface of the clay, otherwise it will not be completely stuck on the piece and can actually come off on your hands or sometimes even go airborne and migrate through the kiln (gas) depositing on neighboring pieces. Does the wash have to contain 3134? No, you can use pretty much any frit or something like Gerstley Borate instead.

In the "marking iron" that I make for studio, I like to add a little bit of clay and CMC to the mix to help with suspension, otherwise it likes to hardpan - I guess you could call it an underglaze but the ratios are not even like in a traditional UG recipe (equal parts color, flux, clay). I'd approximate my ratios are 2 parts RIO, 1 part flux, 1 part clay, mix with CMC solution. This "marking iron" is pretty much used for writing on test tiles or kiln furniture, decoration, and signing your work.

It might fuse to your kiln shelf/wash at higher temps because of the flux content. If you add clay to the recipe and make it closer to an UG, it will be less likely to fuse.

#9 OffCenter

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 01:18 PM

Iron wash, the 3134 is just to make the rio melt faster so it reacts with the surface with more than just a brown iron brush stroke. This also works well with your more stable glazes as well, a normal trick of some potters is to take their functional ware that is semi-matte finished to have glossy smooth rims is a mix of oxide and gerstley applied to the rim of the ware to make it melt and pull downward so on mugs can make the lip go from rough on lips to silky smooth with said gloss finish.


You're just full of it, aren't you? Information that is. You obviously know a lot and don't mind sharing it. Posts like the one above make you a nice addition to this forum. Maybe some day you'll get around to filling out your profile a little more. I'd like to see a sample of your pots.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.




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