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Grey stoneware clay


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#1 Creo

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 05:44 AM

Hello!

Returning to ceramics after a short break, well 15 years :)

I am convinced that I used to use a Stoneware clay, fine grained, that fired to a grey body colour. Not buff, not white, or off-white, best I can describe it is a light to medium grey with maybe a very slight silvery hue to it.
But looking around the suppliers I cant find anything that looks the same.
Now I am wondering if my old memory is playing tricks on me!

So, may I ask, is there a readily available stoneware clay that will fire to a light to medium grey?

Thank you very much.

#2 weeble

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 07:31 AM

Creo, where are you? Here on the west coast, I have used Laguna's "Morocan Sand" clay and their LB-6, both of which are cone 5 clays and they fire to a mid-tone gray. I'm pretty sure they're both widely available, I've picked them up from a couple different suppliers.
Maryjane Carlson

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#3 Creo

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 10:59 AM

Creo, where are you? Here on the west coast, I have used Laguna's "Morocan Sand" clay and their LB-6, both of which are cone 5 clays and they fire to a mid-tone gray. I'm pretty sure they're both widely available, I've picked them up from a couple different suppliers.


Thanks. I am in the UK. I need to be able to fire to a sufficient stoneware strength as the items will have to be frost-proof.

#4 bciskepottery

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 01:39 PM

In your prior potting, did you fire in oxidation or reduction? Many white stonewares turn grey when fired in reduction.

#5 Creo

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 03:00 PM

Just a hobbyist potter, firing in an electric kiln, no frills, with just a kiln-sitter.

#6 OffCenter

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 03:12 PM


Creo, where are you? Here on the west coast, I have used Laguna's "Morocan Sand" clay and their LB-6, both of which are cone 5 clays and they fire to a mid-tone gray. I'm pretty sure they're both widely available, I've picked them up from a couple different suppliers.


Thanks. I am in the UK. I need to be able to fire to a sufficient stoneware strength as the items will have to be frost-proof.


Temp doesn't determine strength. Some cone 10 or 13 clays are not as strong as some cone 4 or 5 clays.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#7 Creo

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 03:44 PM

Ok, thanks.
So what clay do I need to use at what cone to get a silver/grey body?

#8 weeble

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 01:10 AM

You'll have to wait until someone UKish chimes in, I'm afraid I haven't got any idea whats available there!
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#9 trina

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 07:59 AM

Have a look at www.sio-2.com. that should be available in all of the EU. T

#10 AtomicAxe

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 11:48 PM

stoneware in reduction will turn grey as the iron in the clay reacts to the lack of oxygen. In an electric kiln, it's an odd setup to do reduction that can damage elements from some degree. as for a grey clay, ... just wedge 1% black mason stain in there ... instant grey in a standard electric kiln firing.

#11 Nelly

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 04:52 PM

stoneware in reduction will turn grey as the iron in the clay reacts to the lack of oxygen. In an electric kiln, it's an odd setup to do reduction that can damage elements from some degree. as for a grey clay, ... just wedge 1% black mason stain in there ... instant grey in a standard electric kiln firing.


Dear Potter,

Pottery Supply House in Oakville, Ontario, Canada makes a great grey stone ware. Really rich. Shows off iron glazes extremely well.

Nelly

#12 oldlady

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 05:56 PM

hope you find the clay you are looking for. since you are in the UK could you tell me what "crank" clay is? i get all the books our library system has and some mention things i have never heard of including "T material" ??????
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#13 ayjay

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 04:32 PM

hope you find the clay you are looking for. since you are in the UK could you tell me what "crank" clay is? i get all the books our library system has and some mention things i have never heard of including "T material" ??????


Crank is clay with a high proportion of grog usually used for Raku.

T Material - Description below taken from Bath Potters (a supplier), it's quite expensive @ over £40 per 12.5 kilo - standard buff stoneware is 25% of that (or less).

Extremely resilient and tolerant off-white body. Superb for large sculpture and hand building use. Well suited for high quality Raku pieces. Low thermal expansion. Low shrinkage and good warp resistance. Very refractory. Coarse Texture.Off-White.

Firing Temp.1200-1300 deg.C



#14 AtomicAxe

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 08:56 AM


stoneware in reduction will turn grey as the iron in the clay reacts to the lack of oxygen. In an electric kiln, it's an odd setup to do reduction that can damage elements from some degree. as for a grey clay, ... just wedge 1% black mason stain in there ... instant grey in a standard electric kiln firing.


Dear Potter,

Pottery Supply House in Oakville, Ontario, Canada makes a great grey stone ware. Really rich. Shows off iron glazes extremely well.

Nelly


Yeah, that is a grey mason stain clay. All black mason stains contain iron in them, so depending on the percentage of iron, you can easily get things like iron spotting and iron rich clay body effects with a black mason stain. You can do the same with just wedging black into the clay and save on the shipping from canada if you are in the states.




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