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How to wrap canvas properly


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#1 MichaelP

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 10:58 PM

When you want to cover a board or the top of your workbench with heavy canvas, do you prepare the canvas in a certain way? Do you pre-wash/dry it to allow for the first major shrinking to happen before it's attached? Or, maybe, you pre-wet it before stapling to produce tight stretching after it dries? Or, perhaps, you don't do anything special and just staple the canvas "as is"?

Thank you.

Mike

#2 DAY

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 06:12 AM

Do it the same way you stretch canvas on canvas stretchers, For painting. There are probably videos galore.

#3 Pres

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 10:03 AM

When you want to cover a board or the top of your workbench with heavy canvas, do you prepare the canvas in a certain way? Do you pre-wash/dry it to allow for the first major shrinking to happen before it's attached? Or, maybe, you pre-wet it before stapling to produce tight stretching after it dries? Or, perhaps, you don't do anything special and just staple the canvas "as is"?

Thank you.

Mike


As DAY says stretch it like canvas on a stretcher frame for painting. Old school start in the centers on side go to other side center again, pull tight against opposite staple and staple. do the same on the ends from center, on side again move 4-6 inches from center and pull down and out stretching toward end and staple. do other side same way. Continue this until you get to the corners do a hospital corner and fold and staple.

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#4 MichaelP

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 02:05 PM

Thank you!

#5 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 07:45 AM

Could you just get any old wood table and stretch the canvas over it? I don't have a wedging/slab table and just wedge small amounts on the side of my kick wheel table or wheel head. I have been thinking that I need one for some time.
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#6 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 07:45 AM

Could you just get any old wood table and stretch the canvas over it? I don't have a wedging/slab table and just wedge small amounts on the side of my kick wheel table or wheel head. I have been thinking that I need one for some time.
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#7 tindercraft

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 09:04 AM

When you want to cover a board or the top of your workbench with heavy canvas, do you prepare the canvas in a certain way? Do you pre-wash/dry it to allow for the first major shrinking to happen before it's attached? Or, maybe, you pre-wet it before stapling to produce tight stretching after it dries? Or, perhaps, you don't do anything special and just staple the canvas "as is"?

Thank you.

Mike


Starting in the middle as in stretching a painting canvas will do most of the work, but if you want it to stay flat when it gets damp or wet then it would help to wet the canvas before you start. This is a technique that is often used for watercolor paper so that it stays flat while painting. It will depend what you are stretching it over. Can the substrate handle the shrinking and pulling that will happen when the canvas dries. And, don't pull it too tight. Remember that if it is already wet, then it is as loose as it is going to get. So, it just needs to be taught enough (flat- but not super tight). Pulling it tight when it is wet will probably cause it to tear when it dries. But always do start in the middle and work out toward the corners.




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