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#1 blacknapkins

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 01:04 PM

I live in a house build in 1906. I would like to run a(n electric) 10 cubic foot kiln up to cone 8 in the little peripheral garage/shed/shop. The house has modern stoves washers, dryers, etc. If I ran a 210 line out from the washer and dryer would that be OK to run? Is this even something to worry about or CAN wiring heat up and cause fires?

Thanks
Eric

#2 neilestrick

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 02:24 PM

Call an electrician. If you don't know what you're doing you can easily burn your house down. Every kiln has different wiring requirements, and he/she can tell you if your current wiring can handle a kiln. Don't mess around with this! Figure out what kiln you want first, because that will determine what's required. Most 10 cubic foot kilns require a 60 amp circuit, but that can vary.
Neil Estrick
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#3 Diane Puckett

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 04:24 PM

I recommend getting references from more than one person. I was not pleased with the work done by the electrician who wired my studio and have since found someone much better. Interestingly, I got the new person's name from another potter whose new studio had to be rewired after another electrician did it incorrectly. The manufacturer of your kiln should have very specific instructions for wiring. As an aside, if you are going to call in an electrician, have him put in whatever wiring you might need in the future. My studio has counter-high outlets every three feet, and they are very helpful.

In this area, the electric company buries lines, and an independent electrician takes it from there. The electric company does charge for their part.

When it comes to electricity, especially for something like a kiln, I am a firm believer in getting permits and inspections. Not only might it keep you safer, but if there is a fire, you want it documented that you followed code.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#4 neilestrick

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 04:43 PM

When it comes to electricity, especially for something like a kiln, I am a firm believer in getting permits and inspections. Not only might it keep you safer, but if there is a fire, you want it documented that you followed code.


Excellent point. Also make sure your homeowner's insurance company knows about the kiln. They won't necessarily charge you extra for it, but they want to know about it.
Neil Estrick
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#5 Denice

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 04:50 PM

We had a member on this forum catch his house on fire last year because he had knob and tube wiring. His neighbor who claimed he was an electrician and wasn't told him how to wire it, I believe he had to rewire his whole house after the fire to get his house up to code. You probably could just have new wiring, panel box, etc put in the shed and leave the house out of it, depending on your codes. I had a electrician run a line from our meter on the outside of our house to our garage, it was about 30 ft away. The added on panel had to have a big shut off lever to meet code, it just depends on where you live. Denice

#6 TJR

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 04:53 PM

I agree with Neil. Do it correctly one time. I hired an electrician to run a cable from my circuit box directly to my kiln. Called hard wiring as opposed to the plug. It cost $85.00. Money well spent.
TJR.

#7 perkolator

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 05:41 PM

your dryer outlet most likely only has 12 or 10 gauge wiring, on a 30-40 amp breaker for this dedicated circuit. definitely not sufficient for a large kiln or large welder, and definitely not ok to jump off of this existing wiring to power something else, ever.

like others have already said, you will need to pull power from your main fuse panel and either make a sub-panel in your shop space, or keep it as a dedicated circuit for the kiln. personally i'd go sub-panel so you can power other items in the space (assuming you have enough amps total), then hard-wire the kiln to a shutoff box. this way you have several "breaks" in the line to hopefully prevent disaster. ultimately, you need to have a professional assess the power situation at your house.

#8 Diane Puckett

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 06:38 PM

Even though my studio is in back of my house, it is wired directly to the electric pole, completely separate from the house. We did this because there is a pole right next to the studio. This might be an option for you to consider if running a line from the house is not feasible.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#9 Mark C.

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 08:50 PM

I live in a house build in 1906. I would like to run a(n electric) 10 cubic foot kiln up to cone 8 in the little peripheral garage/shed/shop. The house has modern stoves washers, dryers, etc. If I ran a 210 line out from the washer and dryer would that be OK to run? Is this even something to worry about or CAN wiring heat up and cause fires?

Thanks
Eric



First hire an electrician as everyone has said
On a 1906 house you will have to had the house rewired or at least a new electrical main service would have to been put in in the past to make this work.
As noted you will need at least 60 amps to the kiln as a minimum.
This run will have to come off the main service entrance breaker box-if you have old school fuses then a whole new service will be needed.
Any qualified electrician will let you know what's needed -get several bids on the job.
If you do not have it done right a house fire can happen and all your napkins will be black.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com




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