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Phil Rogers pine ash glaze recipe


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#1 ihallhou

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 07:39 PM

Hi Everyone! I'm new to the forum, and I joined because I've been trying to find a good ashy, celadony glaze and I've seen some Phil Rogers pots covered with exactly the glaze I'm looking for, so I wondered if anyone knew about Phil Rogers' trusty pine ash glaze recipe. I actually ordered his book on Amazon, but the wrong book was delivered. Arg! Anyway, I just want that ONE recipe, so I hope somebody is willing to post it here. I can't find it anywhere online.

#2 AtomicAxe

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 10:23 PM

his ash glazes are just that ... an ash glaze. if you want some decent ones, val cushing has a great book that includes ash glazes that do wonderfully. as for color, cobalt carb 1% copper carb 1%

#3 Mark C.

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 11:05 PM

I only have his salt glaze book.I looked and it did not have what you are asking for.
Mark
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#4 TJR

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 12:59 PM

Hey,there;
I just came across the recipe on a hunk of paper while doing my income taxes. I'd rather be on here than unfolding hunks of paper. I have not tested it.
Phil Rogers Ash Glaze
Wood ash 53
Cornwall stone 14.5
Pot Spar 14.5
China clay 6.5
Whiting 4.5
Flint 7

test,test,test.
On the same paper;
Miso Glazed Pork tenderloin
2 tbsp red or yellow miso paste
2 tbsp liquid honey
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp. rice vinegar
remember, test,test,test.
TJR.

#5 Pres

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 01:06 PM

Hey,there;
I just came across the recipe on a hunk of paper while doing my income taxes. I'd rather be on here than unfolding hunks of paper. I have not tested it.
Phil Rogers Ash Glaze
Wood ash 53
Cornwall stone 14.5
Pot Spar 14.5
China clay 6.5
Whiting 4.5
Flint 7

test,test,test.
On the same paper;
Miso Glazed Pork tenderloin
2 tbsp red or yellow miso paste
2 tbsp liquid honey
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp. rice vinegar
remember, test,test,test.
TJR.



Some of you may find this paper of interest on wood ash glazes including some ex. of Phil Rogers work.

http://wvuscholar.wv...S8yMTAzNQ==.pdf

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#6 Round2potter

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 01:07 PM

One cannot simply copy an ash glaze. Phil Rogers experimented for years and years to get the results he wanted; so you might have too as well!

Ash glazes can change from tree to tree (literally) and from forest to forest, and especially from species to species!!!
If you wash your ash it will be different, also it depends on how much you wash your ash!

I am gonna pull up some starter recipes from Ben Greens book on ceramic glazes

Ok, pg 44

Recipe A:
20 Clay
40 Spar
40 Ash

Recipe B:
50 Spar or Cornish Stone
50 Ash

Recipe C:
50 Clay
50 Ash

He states "Recipe C is usually applied like a slip to unfired, leatherhard pots. If the preliminary test appears dry, more feldspar should be added; when the results pool at the bottom of the bowl, the recipe requires additional clay. Some improvements in fusibility will sometimes result from the substitution of wood ash for vegetable ash."

He mentions that with ashes, trial and error testing should be done on every new batch of ash because variations in the material are unpreventable.

Cheers!

-Burt
"There is no such thing as cheating in clay; So long as it works"

#7 Ben

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 02:22 PM

his ash glazes are just that ... an ash glaze. if you want some decent ones, val cushing has a great book that includes ash glazes that do wonderfully. as for color, cobalt carb 1% copper carb 1%


While that may be a great book, Phil has his own ash glaze book that might be a more direct source for info about his glazes. I have Phils book and it is tremendous.

Ben

#8 Roberta12

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 03:22 PM


Hey,there;
I just came across the recipe on a hunk of paper while doing my income taxes. I'd rather be on here than unfolding hunks of paper. I have not tested it.
Phil Rogers Ash Glaze
Wood ash 53
Cornwall stone 14.5
Pot Spar 14.5
China clay 6.5
Whiting 4.5
Flint 7

test,test,test.
On the same paper;
Miso Glazed Pork tenderloin
2 tbsp red or yellow miso paste
2 tbsp liquid honey
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp. rice vinegar
remember, test,test,test.
TJR.



Some of you may find this paper of interest on wood ash glazes including some ex. of Phil Rogers work.

http://wvuscholar.wv...S8yMTAzNQ==.pdf



Thank you for the Pork recipe. It sounds delish!

Roberta



#9 TJR

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 04:20 PM



Hey,there;
I just came across the recipe on a hunk of paper while doing my income taxes. I'd rather be on here than unfolding hunks of paper. I have not tested it.
Phil Rogers Ash Glaze
Wood ash 53
Cornwall stone 14.5
Pot Spar 14.5
China clay 6.5
Whiting 4.5
Flint 7

test,test,test.
On the same paper;
Miso Glazed Pork tenderloin
2 tbsp red or yellow miso paste
2 tbsp liquid honey
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp. rice vinegar
remember, test,test,test.
TJR.



Some of you may find this paper of interest on wood ash glazes including some ex. of Phil Rogers work.

http://wvuscholar.wv...S8yMTAzNQ==.pdf



Thank you for the Pork recipe. It sounds delish!

Roberta

Roberta;
Remember...test first
TJR.

#10 ihallhou

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 12:34 AM

Well it's taken me a long time to respond to this, and for that I apologize.  But I must thank all who responded, especially those who responded usefully.

 

I just wanted to express something, and that's the fact that so many people seem to think that they invented the art of pottery themselves, and that they alone are to thank for all the knowledge going into their glazes, firing techniques, etc.  

 

The fact is, however, that as much as I admire the hard work and craftsmanship of every member of this community, it remains true that nobody living today invented the technology of high-fire ceramics; if you believe you came up with all of your glazes and forms by yourself, then I'd suggest you ask yourself why you're using materials bought in a ceramic supply store.  I'd suggest asking yourself why you're making mugs, bowls, vases, plates, etc.  I'd assume you didn't invent those forms yourself.  When it comes to glazes, I'd suggest that you didn't come to the understanding of how glazes work by digging up different materials and realizing what feldspar looks like and how to grind quartz down to a suitable fineness and how to mine iron oxide.

 

My point is that we all learn about this craft by copying and absorbing information from people who already know about them, and therefore asking for information or even copying glaze recipes (which is what everyone did when they started learning about glazes) is not only not something one cannot do, but something one MUST do in order to further their glaze education.  

 

So, sorry, but I wanted to get that off my chest.  I do understand the coveting of recipes that some people do, because it's born out of a long process of testing and trial and error, and it's a life's work type of process.  But be honest, and realize that we all copied recipes.

 

Peace.



#11 Mark C.

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 12:49 AM

Ihallhou

The real fact of the matter is its all been done before in ceramics-We here in the western world are all just newbies to ceramics.

It does take a lifetime to get some of this(forms and glazes and firing) to work well. 

Happy trails

Mark


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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#12 oldlady

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 07:27 AM

yes, it has all been done before.    private thought...........and for centuries the master knew enough to throw out the stuff we now see on magazine covers.  the concept of what is art has changed so much that today graffiti is seen as something to achieve, not paint over like our predecessors did.          rant over.


"putting you down does not raise me up."




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