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RECYCLED glass infused pottery

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Hi all,

 

I can't find much information already on glass infused pottery, how to do it, and the like - but I wanted to try using reclaimed bottles (bottle frit from the same manufacturer, same bottle type,etc)... can someone tell me or give me even basic information on how this process is done? I googled it but really didn't find much information on it - which I was kind of surprise.

Very interesting - want to try it!!

 

Thanks!

 

Charlene

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Hi all,

 

I can't find much information already on glass infused pottery, how to do it, and the like - but I wanted to try using reclaimed bottles (bottle frit from the same manufacturer, same bottle type,etc)... can someone tell me or give me even basic information on how this process is done? I googled it but really didn't find much information on it - which I was kind of surprise.

Very interesting - want to try it!!

 

Thanks!

 

Charlene

 

 

Steve Branfman has been putting glass on the surface of his raku pieces for many years. He has published articles about how to do it.

Marcia

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I have used broken glass and the "blobs" you can buy in craft stores. I place the pieces of glass along with the glazes and fire. I use low fire white earthenware. It has worked just fine. I once melted a glass candy dish in a large bowl. That worked too. Worse that can happen is you have an explosion, I haven't had that, but we won't know if we don't experiment. Go for it.

 

Donna

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Mark Hewitt in North Carolina glues small pieces of blue glass to the handles of his large jugs. These are called glass runs. He uses Elmers glue. He fires in a wood kiln to Cone 12. Glass can run quite a long way on a pot, so be careful. You can put crushed glass inside a bowl for an interesting effect.

Crushed glass used in glazes is called cullet.

TJR.

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Hi all,

 

I can't find much information already on glass infused pottery, how to do it, and the like - but I wanted to try using reclaimed bottles (bottle frit from the same manufacturer, same bottle type,etc)... can someone tell me or give me even basic information on how this process is done? I googled it but really didn't find much information on it - which I was kind of surprise.

Very interesting - want to try it!!

 

Thanks!

 

Charlene

 

 

There are some tips from Lakeside pottery.......

 

http://www.lakesidepottery.com/HTML%20Text/Tips/firing-fusing-glass-on-pottery-ceramic.htm

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I have been using glass in pots for awhile. It comes out very nicely, especially on white glaze/clay. I have been told that it is not food safe because of the cracking of the glass, but it is a very nice decorative affect.

 

 

Roberta

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Last month I watched a presentation in a glass studio of a new type of glass that comes in paper like sheets that you can cut with scissors. You then place this on your pottery and fire it. There is also an emulsion you can use to make a liquid glass from crushed glass that you can slip trail on your work. The advances in glass are very interesting and can easily be used in a low fire situation with clay. I took an image of the liquid medium they used but cannot find it now ... I imagine a Google search would bring it up.

 

Also, last year Sherman Hall challenged potters to use their recycled glass in glazes ... here is a bit of a link to that.

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/ceramics-monthly/from-the-editor-september-2012/

 

A few years ago Dr. Robert Kirby, a speaker at NCECA challenged potters to try using re-cycled glass in their clay ... not just as a decoration but as a part of the whole piece. I spent several months on my own experiments with it and here is a link to the results :

 

http://www.ccpottery...glass_clay.html

 

Bottom line is that you cannot just smash your own glass, you have to buy a very specific material which was expensive at the time. There were noises at that time of developments that could turn the crushing process into a viable alternative re: yard mulch, sandboxes, commercial sand substitute ... this would have made it much cheaper and easier to buy the "glass sand".

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WOW - THANK YOU EVERYONE...

What I am wanting to try is using recycled glass, break it down into frit, and add that to small trays, tiles, and things like that nature. I know it can run, but I have no idea what the process is - meaning when I add the glass, is it typical to add clear glaze over the top?

 

I don't even know where to start when working with this stuff, and I have no problem with my own experimentation, I just need a place to start - a general "how to". I will go back and read the posts that you all have suggested - THANK YOU...and I also did a "search" with no results- agreed the search engine here is not too good;

 

I just don't know if for example when using ground glass, and small pieces for instance on trays of a decorative sort, if you are supposed to glaze over the top, just fire them and see what happens or what exactly a person is supposed to do - couldn't find much info on it at all.

 

Thanks everyone -

 

Charlene

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We use broken glass bottles...blue and green work well...and the blue and green half marbles for covering the surface of planters. I require a border of some sort to contain the flowing glass, horizontal surfaces only. As they are decorative I suggest inside knobs, carved soap dishes and candle holders or flatish lids with chanels trimmed or carved.

Fluid glazes seem to be better than stiff glazes. If using other colours of glass which tend to become clear then using a coloured glazes work nicely. Our favourite glaze is Randy's Oatmeal Rust.

The better types glass are the rods used by glass bead makers. All those colours melt well. We fire to ^6.

Joan

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WOW - THANK YOU EVERYONE...

What I am wanting to try is using recycled glass, break it down into frit, and add that to small trays, tiles, and things like that nature. I know it can run, but I have no idea what the process is - meaning when I add the glass, is it typical to add clear glaze over the top?

 

I don't even know where to start when working with this stuff, and I have no problem with my own experimentation, I just need a place to start - a general "how to". I will go back and read the posts that you all have suggested - THANK YOU...and I also did a "search" with no results- agreed the search engine here is not too good;

 

I just don't know if for example when using ground glass, and small pieces for instance on trays of a decorative sort, if you are supposed to glaze over the top, just fire them and see what happens or what exactly a person is supposed to do - couldn't find much info on it at all.

 

Thanks everyone -

 

Charlene

 

 

You don't need to glaze over the glass, the glaze is a form of glass itself, so the options you have is to glaze the pieces and then put the glass over the glazed piece or, leave the piece un-glazed and put the glass over the raw bisque. You will find what you like best through experimentation, make small projects to start and go from there. One recommendation I can make is never mix different glasses. Hope you get what you are looking for. Best.

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Hi all,

 

I can't find much information already on glass infused pottery, how to do it, and the like - but I wanted to try using reclaimed bottles (bottle frit from the same manufacturer, same bottle type,etc)... can someone tell me or give me even basic information on how this process is done? I googled it but really didn't find much information on it - which I was kind of surprise.

Very interesting - want to try it!!

 

Thanks!

 

Charlene

 

Experimented with glass beads in wet clay. It's safer than using shards from bottles etc. Using the beads for necklaces, many colors and shapes.

 

Aloha, Ken

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My friend and fellow potter Carrie Althouse has been using discarded scraps of stained glass -- the brighter the colors, the better they turn out. Here's an example of her work with it - http://carriealthous...2%20%284%29.JPG

 

She just puts oddly-shaped shards in little bowls that have been glazed and fires them to ^6. She said they can have a tendency to "crawl" up the inside of the bowl at times, but I tried it myself with a chunk of random glass I found in my backyard, and it turned out just fine.

 

It does have a tendency to crackle, so I wouldn't recommend it for food use (as previously noted by another poster). I don't know if a lower firing might reduce the crackling or not - I haven't had much of a chance to experiment with it other than the one piece.

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We use broken glass bottles...blue and green work well...and the blue and green half marbles for covering the surface of planters. I require a border of some sort to contain the flowing glass, horizontal surfaces only. As they are decorative I suggest inside knobs, carved soap dishes and candle holders or flatish lids with chanels trimmed or carved.

Fluid glazes seem to be better than stiff glazes. If using other colours of glass which tend to become clear then using a coloured glazes work nicely. Our favourite glaze is Randy's Oatmeal Rust.

The better types glass are the rods used by glass bead makers. All those colours melt well. We fire to ^6.

Joan

 

 

Is Randy's Oatmeal Rust oxidation or reduction?

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There was an old potter I ran across in the back woods of Georgia one time (now deceased) ... his glaze was just old beer bottles (green, clear and brown) that he ground with a diesel motor and 2 concrete wheels then hand mixed with a feldspar and ball clay by hand measurements ... made the most interesting glaze I have ever seen. Occasionally I play with that technique, but I tend to use it as a decorative process and not a primary glaze. Funny though, when I asked him about the glaze on his ware ... he responded with 'Oh you city boys are just too smart for your own good' and showed me what he did. crazy too ... looked like he was grinding flower but sounded like he was crushing cats with a truck.

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Although I have not personally used glass, I have a friend who does. I'm pretty sure she uses recycled glass that she crushes herself. After she throws her bowl, plate, or whatever dish she is going to use the glass in, she carves the design into the piece (she only does this on flat surfaces) creating a trough for the glass. Then it's bisque-fired. She then uses latex in the design and dips the piece in the glaze. She removes the latex, then fills in the depression with ground glass and fires to ^6. It always has the 'crackle' effect, but is nice on decorative pieces.

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