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Alternative for Wax Resist


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#1 lincron

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 01:42 PM

I need a resist for a new glazing process I'm trying, but don't have any wax resist on hand. Other than melting paraffin wax with oil, does anyone know, can I use a polyurethane varnish or acrylic sealer? I have heard of using shellac, but I don't have any of that either. I fire to cone 6 in an electric kiln.

#2 neilestrick

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 02:04 PM

I've heard of people using all sorts of things, even floor wax or polyurethane. Make sure your kiln is vented, and probably run a test first.
Neil Estrick
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#3 lincron

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 02:11 PM

I've heard of people using all sorts of things, even floor wax or polyurethane. Make sure your kiln is vented, and probably run a test first.


I'll try the polyurethane then, as it will brush on easily. Thanks so much!

#4 timbo_heff

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 02:22 PM


I've heard of people using all sorts of things, even floor wax or polyurethane. Make sure your kiln is vented, and probably run a test first.


I'll try the polyurethane then, as it will brush on easily. Thanks so much!


That is going to stink when it burns off !!!

#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:50 PM

I got a little jar of water based wood sealer at Home depot. It is white and dries clear, so I added drops of red food coloring. It works well and was $3.96. It takes a couple of coats.

Marcia

#6 TJR

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:05 PM

When I worked in England, we used liquid furniture polish. When I worked at a pottery in Scotland, we used a type of rubber cement called Copydex. You could pull it off after you glazed with a needle tool.A buddy of mine used beaswax in an electric fry pan. Lots of potters and encaustic artists burned down their studios using hot wax.
I like good old wax resist-no smell, and it's safe.Posted Image
TJR.

#7 Pres

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 05:03 PM

When I worked in England, we used liquid furniture polish. When I worked at a pottery in Scotland, we used a type of rubber cement called Copydex. You could pull it off after you glazed with a needle tool.A buddy of mine used beaswax in an electric fry pan. Lots of potters and encaustic artists burned down their studios using hot wax.
I like good old wax resist-no smell, and it's safe.Posted Image
TJR.


I have used shellac, polymer medium, wax resist medium, melted paraffin, crayons drawn on, furniture polish, and even waxed cord I found in an old wood shop. When using regular wax resist you do have to be careful, as there are some brands that make a resist for bare clay, and a separate resist for over glaze.All of these materials have different characteristics like cleanness of line, thick/thin response, bleed, and pressure response.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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