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#1 morah

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 10:04 AM

Recently there has been a lot written about leaching and food safety. I was wondering if anyone knows if this also applies to pots made with kid safe/food safe/ non toxic low fire Amaco clay and glazes. When I work with elementary age kids, they often make projects that will be used for food- like honey pots, sushi trays, ice cream bowls etc. As those of you who work with this age group know, kids' projects are far from perfect. They often forget to glaze a spot, a piece breaks off leaving an exposed area, or there is crazing on the surface.They (and their parents) are usually so proud of the result that they will use it for food no matter what deformities it has. What I need to know is if I am poisoning these kids!?! Are there any types of food I should tell them to avoid using in their pots? Are honey or sushi or ice cream particularly problematic? Thanks for your help- it is really reasurring to have a pool of knowledgable people to turn to when I have questions.

#2 TJR

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 11:04 AM

I am not an expert on glazing by any means . I have taught art in schools for 27 years. The glazes to look out for are the ones containing lead. They will say right on the label "Not Food Safe".
Foods to avoid for leaching are acidic foods such as lemonade, Coke/Pepsi, tomato juice. If your glazes do not contain lead, you should be O.K.If you have unglazed areas, there may be some absorbtion of moisture into the body of the piece-resulting in bacteria.At low fire temperatures, pots are not vitrified, and are porous. This would be your concern.
TJR.

#3 JBaymore

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 11:26 AM

Morah,

Good to see you are concerned about this subject.

Unfortunately there are no easy "absolute" answers. (That just seems to apply to ceramics in general........ the correct response to every question in ceramics is.... "It depends.")

First of all, the non-toxic labeling "game" from the manufacturers is itself a bit of an issue. Many things are able to be labeled as "non-toxic" when they are wet....... and need to be labeled as carcinogenic when they are dry and the dust is airborne. Every clay body and every glaze contains respirable microcrystalline silica; a known carcinogen. So to really undestand what you and your kids are working with, you need to know a bit about the technical side of things.

Get the MSDSs for all of the matrerials that you are using in the classroom and learn to read them. (Actually this is a legal requirement that your EMPLOYER must have them on hand and available to you under OSHA laws.) They offer clues to what is in the products.....but not the exact proprietary compositions.

"Food safe" is a somewhat relative and non-specific term in the way potters and the craft ceramics manufacturers use it. The ONLY way to know if a glaze surface is leaching for sure is to have the glaze laboratory tested (standard acetic acid leach test) for the specific compounds of concern. And the stability of a particular glaze can be affected by things like precise firing cone, application thickness, underlying clay body, and if the glaze is crossed with another glaze.

Because things common in glazes like silica (SiO2) and alumina (Al2O3) are not particularly toxic by ingestion, you don't need to even test for them. Iron oxide is anotehr one that for MOST people is not a potential toxicity issue. But some other compounds are of potential concern. The only two actually legally regulated for leaching in the USA are lead and cadmium compounds. The other main potential "culprits" of likely most leaching concern are barium, lithium, manganese, cobalt, and copper.

Now we need to put this issue in some perspective also. Are your kids drinking from plastic water bottles? Do their parents cook with pans lined with non-stick surface applications on the metal? Do they microwave things in plastic containers? We get all concerned about the leaching of things out of glazes and make a big deal of it. But we seem to somehow ignore what is likely coming out of the plastic bottles and other food service items we use every day.

There are plenty of other "art health issues" in schools too. So we need to be careful in focusing just on ceramics as the "bad boy".

For example Fimo clay should NOT be handled by kids! There is a compound in ther that makes the plastic malleable that is really toxic on skin contact.

There are a few books that should be in the library of any art department and artist. One is "Artist Beware" by Dr. Michael McCann. The others are "The Artists Complete Helath and Safety Guide" and "Keeping Claywork Safe and Legal" by Mononna Rossol.

A great resource for K-12 teachers is Mononna Rossol and her A.C.T.S. organization. She has great data sheet handouts on these kinds of issues for use in school settings.

http://www.artscraft...ty.org/bio.html

http://www.artscraft...datasheets.html

Hope this is a start for you......

best,

.......................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#4 morah

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 06:12 PM

Morah,

Good to see you are concerned about this subject.

Unfortunately there are no easy "absolute" answers. (That just seems to apply to ceramics in general........ the correct response to every question in ceramics is.... "It depends.")

First of all, the non-toxic labeling "game" from the manufacturers is itself a bit of an issue. Many things are able to be labeled as "non-toxic" when they are wet....... and need to be labeled as carcinogenic when they are dry and the dust is airborne. Every clay body and every glaze contains respirable microcrystalline silica; a known carcinogen. So to really undestand what you and your kids are working with, you need to know a bit about the technical side of things.

Get the MSDSs for all of the matrerials that you are using in the classroom and learn to read them. (Actually this is a legal requirement that your EMPLOYER must have them on hand and available to you under OSHA laws.) They offer clues to what is in the products.....but not the exact proprietary compositions.

"Food safe" is a somewhat relative and non-specific term in the way potters and the craft ceramics manufacturers use it. The ONLY way to know if a glaze surface is leaching for sure is to have the glaze laboratory tested (standard acetic acid leach test) for the specific compounds of concern. And the stability of a particular glaze can be affected by things like precise firing cone, application thickness, underlying clay body, and if the glaze is crossed with another glaze.

Because things common in glazes like silica (SiO2) and alumina (Al2O3) are not particularly toxic by ingestion, you don't need to even test for them. Iron oxide is anotehr one that for MOST people is not a potential toxicity issue. But some other compounds are of potential concern. The only two actually legally regulated for leaching in the USA are lead and cadmium compounds. The other main potential "culprits" of likely most leaching concern are barium, lithium, manganese, cobalt, and copper.

Now we need to put this issue in some perspective also. Are your kids drinking from plastic water bottles? Do their parents cook with pans lined with non-stick surface applications on the metal? Do they microwave things in plastic containers? We get all concerned about the leaching of things out of glazes and make a big deal of it. But we seem to somehow ignore what is likely coming out of the plastic bottles and other food service items we use every day.

There are plenty of other "art health issues" in schools too. So we need to be careful in focusing just on ceramics as the "bad boy".

For example Fimo clay should NOT be handled by kids! There is a compound in ther that makes the plastic malleable that is really toxic on skin contact.

There are a few books that should be in the library of any art department and artist. One is "Artist Beware" by Dr. Michael McCann. The others are "The Artists Complete Helath and Safety Guide" and "Keeping Claywork Safe and Legal" by Mononna Rossol.

A great resource for K-12 teachers is Mononna Rossol and her A.C.T.S. organization. She has great data sheet handouts on these kinds of issues for use in school settings.

http://www.artscraft...ty.org/bio.html

http://www.artscraft...datasheets.html

Hope this is a start for you......

best,

.......................john


John thanks for the very thorough discussion of the topic. It seems like there are more questions than answers!
Let's take the manufacturer at their word for the moment and assume that their products are perfectly non toxic and food safe for elementary age children, I do want to know more about what TJR mentioned.
If the kids miss a spot when they are glazing, is this creating a breeding ground for bacteria? Would the pot have to store food long term as in a honey pot as opposed to short term as in a honey dish just used for serving? And if the pot is fully glazed (I can check before firing and do some "touch ups"), but low fired (cone 06/cone 04) is it still a breeding ground for bacteria or does the glaze seal it enough to keep it from absorbing even at low fire temperatures?
I really want to do what is best for the kids despite their parents' possible lack of attention to current health issues but it would really be difficult for me to eliminate all projects that would be used for food. If there is any way to do this safely I would like to figure it out. Thanks for your help.
Mora

#5 JBaymore

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 08:42 PM

Let's take the manufacturer at their word for the moment and assume that their products are perfectly non toxic and food safe for elementary age children, .........................


Mora,

Personally, I think that is a mistake to assume that fact. If you want to test/prove that... ask the manufacturer to give you a written document of indemnification on the toxicity issues from their "safe" products. If it were really "safe" in all cases it would be a snap for them to do so to help promiote sales. You won't get it.

If the kids miss a spot when they are glazing, is this creating a breeding ground for bacteria?


At the level of a technicality... yes, this COULD allow that to happen. The more vitrified the body, the less the likelihood. The shorter term the food storage, the less time for potential bactererial growth. (The colder the storage the less growth..........and so on and so on.) You are asking for absolute black and white answers in a pair of fields (ceramic science and biological science) of highly technical issues that have a large number of variables.

Bacterial growth is possible in crazing lines in glazes, in bodies that are still porous, (like most earthenwares) and so on. But the documentation of actual health issues fom this is scant to non-existant.

Personally I'd be more concerned about what you are exposing the kids to in the classroom than what they and their families are being exposed to in the home with the objects in use. And you can't undestand or control their household hygiene practices... so don't try.

When it comes to bacteria and such, remember that total isolation from environmental insults to the immune system actually is a detriment to health. You build up no immunity to minor pathogens. So something that would not normally bother you will make you really sick. We can over think this whole issue.

You want to get your "answers" from folks/sources that have some form of formal background / credentials in the field when it comes to the "serious stuff". I refer you again to Mononna Rossols GREAT handouts for school teachers. You'll be pleased you got them and thay will be REAL eye openers.

best,

....................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#6 Benzine

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 09:56 PM

As per usual JBaymore, you are a geyser of wisdom.....A fountain is too slow of a flow, to accurately describe you.

"Personally I'd be more concerned about what you are exposing the kids to in the classroom than what they and their families are being exposed to in the home with the objects in use. And you can't undestand or control their household hygiene practices... so don't try. "

Indeed. But sadly, schools are becoming expected to do more for the students, than their families are. Remember, schools were forced to change their meals to make them healthier. Because apparently the eight hours they spend at school, is greater than the time they spend outside of school.

"When it comes to bacteria and such, remember that total isolation from environmental insults to the immune system actually is a detriment to health. You build up no immunity to minor pathogens. So something that would not normally bother you will make you really sick. We can over think this whole issue."

I agree again. We are slowly making ourselves weaker/ more sensitive to various external sources. That's why, when they offered to put a hand sanitizer in my classroom, I declined.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#7 maorili

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 05:30 AM

hello again,

maybe my answer of yesterday was on a very simple level, but where did it vanish? :huh:src="http://ceramicartsda...fault/huh.gif"> I can't see it anymore in the forum. :blink:src="http://ceramicartsda...ult/blink.gif">
I agree with all the technical infos about body and glaze and thoughts about bacteria etc.
Is this information for teachers in USA downloadable somewhere? Maybe interesting for me here in Germany.

I post it again, maybe it is something that might help on a practical side to handle childrens work.

Topic: Leaching in kid's projects (maorili -- Today, 05:03 AM) http://ceramicartsda...?showtopic=3655 ............................................ Hello morah, I found an interesting solution for this "glazing" problem online, but I don't remember the website. A teacher who works regularly with children first glazes the whole project (not the bottom, of course) with a white glaze, then the kids start painting on it. So if they don't get glaze at any point, it is no problem, and it looks good (maybe white glaze spots, but no unglazed clay). I'm working in afternoon classes, and I tell the children that only if they use special glazes AND i can burn them high enough, it will be really "foodsafe". Other work should be used maybe for sweets or chips or just decoration. Icecream is so fast vanished, may be no problem too. But cleaning could be. I don't think that a sushi plate will be any problem. Maybe soja sauce will get in glaze cracks, which isn't so nice. So why not telling them to stay on decorative or figurative work first? If you can burn high enough, you could buy some nice other glazes and sometimes offer "dish" designing good luck Gabi =====================================
greetings
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#8 morah

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 09:04 AM

hello again,

maybe my answer of yesterday was on a very simple level, but where did it vanish? :huh:src="http://ceramicartsda...fault/huh.gif"> I can't see it anymore in the forum. :blink:src="http://ceramicartsda...ult/blink.gif">
I agree with all the technical infos about body and glaze and thoughts about bacteria etc.
Is this information for teachers in USA downloadable somewhere? Maybe interesting for me here in Germany.

I post it again, maybe it is something that might help on a practical side to handle childrens work.

Topic: Leaching in kid's projects (maorili -- Today, 05:03 AM) http://ceramicartsda...?showtopic=3655 ............................................ Hello morah, I found an interesting solution for this "glazing" problem online, but I don't remember the website. A teacher who works regularly with children first glazes the whole project (not the bottom, of course) with a white glaze, then the kids start painting on it. So if they don't get glaze at any point, it is no problem, and it looks good (maybe white glaze spots, but no unglazed clay). I'm working in afternoon classes, and I tell the children that only if they use special glazes AND i can burn them high enough, it will be really "foodsafe". Other work should be used maybe for sweets or chips or just decoration. Icecream is so fast vanished, may be no problem too. But cleaning could be. I don't think that a sushi plate will be any problem. Maybe soja sauce will get in glaze cracks, which isn't so nice. So why not telling them to stay on decorative or figurative work first? If you can burn high enough, you could buy some nice other glazes and sometimes offer "dish" designing good luck Gabi =====================================


Thank you for taking the time to put up that answer again Gabi, I didn't see it the first time. I have 2 questions. First of all how high is high enough for something to be food safe? I am required to work with manufactured glazes that are specially formulated for children and they are usually rated for low fire work. My second question is if there is any difference between clear and colored glazes in terms of their protective abilities. My students usually paint on colored glazes (Amaco Teachers Pallete non toxic, food safe etc.) and then cover it with a painted on clear glaze (also child safe, non toxic, etc). If I were to put on white glaze first, would this seal it as well as the clear glaze at the end? Or would it be better for me to just do another coat of clear before firing?

#9 Pres

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 10:43 PM


hello again,

maybe my answer of yesterday was on a very simple level, but where did it vanish? :huh:src="http://ceramicartsda...fault/huh.gif"> I can't see it anymore in the forum. :blink:src="http://ceramicartsda...ult/blink.gif">
I agree with all the technical infos about body and glaze and thoughts about bacteria etc.
Is this information for teachers in USA downloadable somewhere? Maybe interesting for me here in Germany.

I post it again, maybe it is something that might help on a practical side to handle childrens work.

Topic: Leaching in kid's projects (maorili -- Today, 05:03 AM) http://ceramicartsda...?showtopic=3655 ............................................ Hello morah, I found an interesting solution for this "glazing" problem online, but I don't remember the website. A teacher who works regularly with children first glazes the whole project (not the bottom, of course) with a white glaze, then the kids start painting on it. So if they don't get glaze at any point, it is no problem, and it looks good (maybe white glaze spots, but no unglazed clay). I'm working in afternoon classes, and I tell the children that only if they use special glazes AND i can burn them high enough, it will be really "foodsafe". Other work should be used maybe for sweets or chips or just decoration. Icecream is so fast vanished, may be no problem too. But cleaning could be. I don't think that a sushi plate will be any problem. Maybe soja sauce will get in glaze cracks, which isn't so nice. So why not telling them to stay on decorative or figurative work first? If you can burn high enough, you could buy some nice other glazes and sometimes offer "dish" designing good luck Gabi =====================================


Thank you for taking the time to put up that answer again Gabi, I didn't see it the first time. I have 2 questions. First of all how high is high enough for something to be food safe? I am required to work with manufactured glazes that are specially formulated for children and they are usually rated for low fire work. My second question is if there is any difference between clear and colored glazes in terms of their protective abilities. My students usually paint on colored glazes (Amaco Teachers Pallete non toxic, food safe etc.) and then cover it with a painted on clear glaze (also child safe, non toxic, etc). If I were to put on white glaze first, would this seal it as well as the clear glaze at the end? Or would it be better for me to just do another coat of clear before firing?


All glazes must be fired to the temperature created for, and many are naturally lacking in harmful chemicals. Those foodsafe labeled Amaco glazes are made to be safe if fired as directed in their specs to ^06 or whatever. If you fire them 1/2 cone lower because of position in the kiln, or the way the setter is set up or some other reason they are not safe. Check your kiln for even firing by placing cone packs so that you can check out where the hot and cold spots are. This will help you with the different types of glazes. If you use cones you can stretch the firing a little hotter or a little cooler by placement of the cone in the setter. More thickness will not fall as fast thus hotter. If you are not certain about how things fired they are not foodsafe.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#10 Pres

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 10:50 PM

Morah,

Good to see you are concerned about this subject.

Unfortunately there are no easy "absolute" answers. (That just seems to apply to ceramics in general........ the correct response to every question in ceramics is.... "It depends.")

First of all, the non-toxic labeling "game" from the manufacturers is itself a bit of an issue. Many things are able to be labeled as "non-toxic" when they are wet....... and need to be labeled as carcinogenic when they are dry and the dust is airborne. Every clay body and every glaze contains respirable microcrystalline silica; a known carcinogen. So to really undestand what you and your kids are working with, you need to know a bit about the technical side of things.

Get the MSDSs for all of the matrerials that you are using in the classroom and learn to read them. (Actually this is a legal requirement that your EMPLOYER must have them on hand and available to you under OSHA laws.) They offer clues to what is in the products.....but not the exact proprietary compositions.

"Food safe" is a somewhat relative and non-specific term in the way potters and the craft ceramics manufacturers use it. The ONLY way to know if a glaze surface is leaching for sure is to have the glaze laboratory tested (standard acetic acid leach test) for the specific compounds of concern. And the stability of a particular glaze can be affected by things like precise firing cone, application thickness, underlying clay body, and if the glaze is crossed with another glaze.

Because things common in glazes like silica (SiO2) and alumina (Al2O3) are not particularly toxic by ingestion, you don't need to even test for them. Iron oxide is anotehr one that for MOST people is not a potential toxicity issue. But some other compounds are of potential concern. The only two actually legally regulated for leaching in the USA are lead and cadmium compounds. The other main potential "culprits" of likely most leaching concern are barium, lithium, manganese, cobalt, and copper.

Now we need to put this issue in some perspective also. Are your kids drinking from plastic water bottles? Do their parents cook with pans lined with non-stick surface applications on the metal? Do they microwave things in plastic containers? We get all concerned about the leaching of things out of glazes and make a big deal of it. But we seem to somehow ignore what is likely coming out of the plastic bottles and other food service items we use every day.

There are plenty of other "art health issues" in schools too. So we need to be careful in focusing just on ceramics as the "bad boy".

For example Fimo clay should NOT be handled by kids! There is a compound in ther that makes the plastic malleable that is really toxic on skin contact.

There are a few books that should be in the library of any art department and artist. One is "Artist Beware" by Dr. Michael McCann. The others are "The Artists Complete Helath and Safety Guide" and "Keeping Claywork Safe and Legal" by Mononna Rossol.

A great resource for K-12 teachers is Mononna Rossol and her A.C.T.S. organization. She has great data sheet handouts on these kinds of issues for use in school settings.

http://www.artscraft...ty.org/bio.html

http://www.artscraft...datasheets.html

Hope this is a start for you......

best,

.......................john



Thank you John! Yes there are many more health issues in the art department, and if one were to look, you would find them in the science departments, drama, home ec, and so many others. In my HS I started out doing zinc plate etchings, working with many different types of solvents, using the Photo studio to develop film, and worked in the wood shop and metals shops making tools for my classrooms. Many times the health hazards of the 70-90's were kicked out of industry by Osha, but stayed around in the schools. By the time I left, most of it was gone, because of the teachers not some outside source. Too many times I would hear in department chair meetings that such and such material was not longer being used because it was a risk for the teaching staff. Bravo, because in the long run it protected the children.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#11 Benzine

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Posted 07 March 2013 - 08:37 PM

"Thank you John! Yes there are many more health issues in the art department, and if one were to look, you would find them in the science departments, drama, home ec, and so many others. In my HS I started out doing zinc plate etchings, working with many different types of solvents, using the Photo studio to develop film, and worked in the wood shop and metals shops making tools for my classrooms. Many times the health hazards of the 70-90's were kicked out of industry by Osha, but stayed around in the schools. By the time I left, most of it was gone, because of the teachers not some outside source. Too many times I would hear in department chair meetings that such and such material was not longer being used because it was a risk for the teaching staff. Bravo, because in the long run it protected the children."

The guy I replaced, at my second teaching job, had been in the position for twenty to thirty years. I told my coworker, at that school, I'm going to keep tabs on the retired teacher over the years, because he's our canary in the mine. He taught ceramics, photography, stained glass and jewelry, to name the more potentially hazardous courses. If he dealt with all the older, more toxic, chemicals and processes, and remains healthy, I know I'll be OK.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#12 maorili

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 03:41 AM

I think, that you, morah, already do a lot for the childs safety.

It sounds like their clay projects are at the moment good protected, with underglaze AND a sort of overglaze.

I'm not sure about the clays available to you, but here in Germany some clays are sold that are vitrified at low temperatures, around 1080 °C. (I don't know a lot about these "cones" because my kiln is with electric programming.

That might fit with Amaco glazes?? If you have a good glaze, which was at the right temperature in the kiln AND the clay is vitrified, that might add to the quality of childrens work so that you don't have to worry about their saftety at home. You can't influence the hygiene there.

Thanks for sharing your ideas to all the others, very informative!
greetings
Gabi
greetings
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http://maoridesign.jimdo.com/
Necessity is the mother of invention

#13 JBaymore

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 01:12 PM

.................I'm going to keep tabs on the retired teacher over the years, because he's our canary in the mine. He taught ceramics, photography, stained glass and jewelry, to name the more potentially hazardous courses. If he dealt with all the older, more toxic, chemicals and processes, and remains healthy, I know I'll be OK.


Actually, if you look at industrial hygiene and toxocology information in some detail.... you'll find that this is not really the case. You do hear this example given all the time.... it is a common thinking....... but there are factors in each individual's personal health profile, exposures in other aspects of their life, genetic predisposition, and so on that make this seem a logical way to look at it..... but not actually be so.

best,

......................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#14 JBaymore

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 01:13 PM

Many times the health hazards of the 70-90's were kicked out of industry by Osha, but stayed around in the schools.


Ain't that the truth!

best,

......................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#15 JBaymore

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 01:46 PM

For yucks I looked at the Amaco Teacher's Choice and Teacher's Pallate glaze series MDSDs. Pretty minimal documents in my opinion. (It is important to note that the completion of MSDSs is up to the company, and I am told by Monona Rossol that basically no one enforces that the content be all that accurate.)

The Amaco MSDS sheet lists the color possibilities........ but it seems that the MDSD is for only the base glaze........ the things (likely at least cobalt compounds) that produce a color like "Midnight Blue" do not show in the CAS listings.

And of course the "technicality assumption" here is that the glaze is looked at SOLELY in the WET form........ otherwise a product containing microcrystalline silica (clays and flint are CAS indicated components) cannot be said to be non-carcinogenic.

Also note the "no guarantees" on the accuracy comment at the bottom of one of them.


I'll say here again that I think K-12 teachers should be looking at the following three data sheets available from ACTS:
Selecting Children's Art Materials (6 pages)

Teaching Art & Theater Safely (8 pages)

Understanding the MSDS (4 pages)




best,

...................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#16 morah

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 07:58 PM

For yucks I looked at the Amaco Teacher's Choice and Teacher's Pallate glaze series MDSDs. Pretty minimal documents in my opinion. (It is important to note that the completion of MSDSs is up to the company, and I am told by Monona Rossol that basically no one enforces that the content be all that accurate.)

The Amaco MSDS sheet lists the color possibilities........ but it seems that the MDSD is for only the base glaze........ the things (likely at least cobalt compounds) that produce a color like "Midnight Blue" do not show in the CAS listings.

And of course the "technicality assumption" here is that the glaze is looked at SOLELY in the WET form........ otherwise a product containing microcrystalline silica (clays and flint are CAS indicated components) cannot be said to be non-carcinogenic.

Also note the "no guarantees" on the accuracy comment at the bottom of one of them.


I'll say here again that I think K-12 teachers should be looking at the following three data sheets available from ACTS:
Selecting Children's Art Materials (6 pages)

Teaching Art & Theater Safely (8 pages)

Understanding the MSDS (4 pages)




best,

...................john



OK John, I'm reading you loud and clear. I will see if I can get a hold of the data sheets you are recommending, but in the meantime what do you recommend I use with the kids if they are making projects to be used with food?




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