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morah

Leaching in kid's projects

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morah    3

Recently there has been a lot written about leaching and food safety. I was wondering if anyone knows if this also applies to pots made with kid safe/food safe/ non toxic low fire Amaco clay and glazes. When I work with elementary age kids, they often make projects that will be used for food- like honey pots, sushi trays, ice cream bowls etc. As those of you who work with this age group know, kids' projects are far from perfect. They often forget to glaze a spot, a piece breaks off leaving an exposed area, or there is crazing on the surface.They (and their parents) are usually so proud of the result that they will use it for food no matter what deformities it has. What I need to know is if I am poisoning these kids!?! Are there any types of food I should tell them to avoid using in their pots? Are honey or sushi or ice cream particularly problematic? Thanks for your help- it is really reasurring to have a pool of knowledgable people to turn to when I have questions.

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maorili    0

Hello morah,

 

I found an interesting solution for this "glazing" problem online, but I don't remember the website.

A teacher who works regularly with children first glazes the whole project (not the bottom, of course) with a white glaze, then the kids start painting on it.

So if they don't get glaze at any point, it is no problem, and it looks good (maybe white glaze spots, but no unglazed clay).

 

 

I'm working in afternoon classes, and I tell the children that only if they use special glazes AND i can burn them high enough, it will be really "foodsafe".

Other work should be used maybe for sweets or chips or just decoration. Icecream is so fast vanished, may be no problem too. But cleaning could be.

I don't think that a sushi plate will be any problem. Maybe soja sauce will get in glaze cracks, which isn't so nice.

 

So why not telling them to stay on decorative or figurative work first? If you can burn high enough, you could buy some nice other glazes and sometimes offer "dish" designing

 

good luck

Gabi

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derp    0

I like that idea too. IN general this is my first post and this is my favorite topic too. I like children when the play with clay using their creativity. It is important that the pots should be food safety as this add more attraction in an interior of the house and also using as crockery. I will test your idea and will like to ask more about such ideas.

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morah    3

I like that idea too. IN general this is my first post and this is my favorite topic too. I like children when the play with clay using their creativity. It is important that the pots should be food safety as this add more attraction in an interior of the house and also using as crockery. I will test your idea and will like to ask more about such ideas.

 

 

Sorry everyone. I just realized that somehow this topic is posted twice in this forum (I must have accidentally pressed enter twice) If a moderator could please combine the two, I think everyone would benefit from reading both of them together. Thanks

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Pres    896

Hello morah,

 

I found an interesting solution for this "glazing" problem online, but I don't remember the website.

A teacher who works regularly with children first glazes the whole project (not the bottom, of course) with a white glaze, then the kids start painting on it.

So if they don't get glaze at any point, it is no problem, and it looks good (maybe white glaze spots, but no unglazed clay).

 

 

I'm working in afternoon classes, and I tell the children that only if they use special glazes AND i can burn them high enough, it will be really "foodsafe".

Other work should be used maybe for sweets or chips or just decoration. Icecream is so fast vanished, may be no problem too. But cleaning could be.

I don't think that a sushi plate will be any problem. Maybe soja sauce will get in glaze cracks, which isn't so nice.

 

So why not telling them to stay on decorative or figurative work first? If you can burn high enough, you could buy some nice other glazes and sometimes offer "dish" designing

 

good luck

Gabi

 

 

I ran vinegar(acid) and dishwasher soap(alkali) test on all of my glazes in the studio. This allowed me to make certain that what was there would be reasonably safe if fired the same each time. As I used a kiln setter, and a set firing schedule I was taking as many factors out of the mix as I could. You can't be perfect, but you had better take every step to be close to perfect.

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