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Is it only me. . .


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#21 AtomicAxe

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 07:54 PM

At the school I do my work in ... through donations only I estimated about 500 pounds of barium is sitting in the back closet in various containers and bags. I personally hate the stuff ... I can see on a purely sculptural piece why people like it in a glaze ... but in a studio that has students who don't know dink about glazes ... it's not good to have just sitting there. I will use lithium and deal with the colors not being AS vibrant ... but barium ... yeah ... that is a beast of many backs, none of which are nice.

As it is i'm going to make a push to throw away the large mass of barium that will only serve to cause harm ... will keep maybe a small container for those that know how to use it for their personal use .. but really ... if other potters give it away to keep it out of their studio ... why would a SCHOOL want it.

#22 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 08:31 PM

Because it costs a lot to dispose of toxic chemicals.
In order to thow toxic cheicals away, they must be handled as has-mats and taken to the proper disposal site.
To have the chemicals tested costs a lot.
So, if you can find potters who WANT he barium for their private studio, it would save you a lot of money.
I had a friend in Ohio who took a trailer load of chemicals from the heirs of a potters. It was going to cost them $10,000 to dispose of the chemicals.
She hauled the materials away, advertised them for free and gave them to potters who wanted them. Hazardous or not, if the chemicals are not labeled correctly, they have to be tested to determine if they are toxic.
It is an expensive proposition.

Marcia

#23 Pres

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 09:23 AM

Because it costs a lot to dispose of toxic chemicals.
In order to thow toxic cheicals away, they must be handled as has-mats and taken to the proper disposal site.
To have the chemicals tested costs a lot.
So, if you can find potters who WANT he barium for their private studio, it would save you a lot of money.
I had a friend in Ohio who took a trailer load of chemicals from the heirs of a potters. It was going to cost them $10,000 to dispose of the chemicals.
She hauled the materials away, advertised them for free and gave them to potters who wanted them. Hazardous or not, if the chemicals are not labeled correctly, they have to be tested to determine if they are toxic.
It is an expensive proposition.

Marcia


After following this strand long enough, I have come to the conclusion, It isn't only me. Many of you seem to be reluctant to use barium and some of the other potentially hazardous health questionable materials. Thanks.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#24 earthfan

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 11:45 PM

A ceramic chemist of my acquaintance says barium is safe in glazes as long as it is well dissolved in the glaze. The highest proportion the barium should go is .1 molecular equivalents. He doesn't regard the brightly coloured, matt, barium glazes as being glazes at all. While barium sulphate, used in barium meal for x-ray purposes, isn't dangerous, barium carbonate used by potters is. His advice if you suspect you have ingested barium carbonate, is to swallow Epsom salts. One teaspoon of Epsom salts dissolved in a cup of water and swallowed quickly should precipitate any barium in the stomach as barium sulphate. (from Mike Kusnik's Guide to Ceramic Technology, 2008)



#25 Pres

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 11:30 AM

Jeez! Why take the risk of even having it in the studio?


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#26 Babs

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 09:33 PM

May just be my mood, schools outside this comment, we know many people die on our roads, we use them with care, so I handle toxic chemicals with care and the knowledge of what they can do if I am careless. Poss safer than many of our roads, drivers and teh vehicles on them.



#27 Mark C.

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 01:47 AM

I think that in schools it fine to keep out things that could hurt students as the control factor may be absent at times.

That also means weilding gasses and fumes as well as pottery chemicals and other stuff that can get you.

Its to bad its heading down this road-usually by lawyers

Now for studio potters its up to each to decide

I learned about fuming salt wares in school and that stuff is Nasty-heck lusters are nasty-that was a school experence

It made up a part of my ceramic knowledge and experience-I would not trade that for a million$$$s

but I own some  of all that today as I have for 40 years and know how to handle it-(I have not fumed a load in a decade)or used my lusters as well.

same is true with any chemical. its about handling-heck I still have all the acids from chemistry kit from my family as well as bugs in Carbon tetracloride-its about knowing what it is and how to store and handle it.

Life does not come with a warrrenty-you are responsible-this is a learned skill from doing.

Risk is decided by each person and changes over time-always being re-evaluated

Some think my 2,000 scuba dives are risky-my decompression diving at a younger age was risky-

Playing with fire-building kilns-raku where does one draw the line

I would not be the person I am without risks.

Everyone decides this for themselves

I think to anwser your question its only you as its not me-it may be others as well but risk is life at least for me to some degree.

Mark Cortright


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