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Westby Kiln


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#1 Round2potter

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 09:20 PM

Dear all,

I just got for free, an old westby electric kiln.

The bricks look ok, and the coils are intact, but the catch is................. the power cord has no plug on it.

Well it did, but it was hay wired and was a dryer plug, i am like 99% sure this kiln uses a standard plug.

where do i buy a plug to wire in, and how do i do this?

I am anxious to see if this thing works. It little, has 2 coils and 1 switch.
The sitter is a k-10 but i am not sure what the kiln model # is; it is a small little test kiln that says it will hit ^8

model 12W Serial 5019

Any info helps!!!

-Burt
"There is no such thing as cheating in clay; So long as it works"

#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 10:43 PM

I'd check around with local pottery groups and studios to see if someone else has a similar kiln and get plug info from that person . . . or perhaps they have a manual. Not only do you want the right plug, but also the right size wiring.

#3 Round2potter

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 11:03 PM

Yeah, i looked at home depot and they have plugs both heavy duty and industrial duty rated at 20 amp.
Normally the plugs for lamps and stuff uses 10 or 15 am plugs.

I am going to talk to the lab tech at my school about it, he knows all!
"There is no such thing as cheating in clay; So long as it works"

#4 neilestrick

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 01:31 PM

Does the serial plate say the voltage, phase and amperage of the kiln? That will determine what type of plug you need.
Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
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Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

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#5 Round2potter

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 09:42 PM

its 115 volt at 19 amps and uses 2200 watts

i bought today a plug for it and a 20 amp wall plug to wire in so i can use it.

The real big question now is how do i wire the plug onto the cord????? white to black black to red green to blue idk......

The plug i bought i now found out has three terminal hookups (white black and green) while the cord coming form the kiln has green black white and RED.

What do i do????
"There is no such thing as cheating in clay; So long as it works"

#6 neilestrick

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 09:13 AM

its 115 volt at 19 amps and uses 2200 watts

i bought today a plug for it and a 20 amp wall plug to wire in so i can use it.

The real big question now is how do i wire the plug onto the cord????? white to black black to red green to blue idk......

The plug i bought i now found out has three terminal hookups (white black and green) while the cord coming form the kiln has green black white and RED.

What do i do????


First, if the kiln must be on a breaker that is 25% larger than the actual draw. So at 19 amps you need a breaker of about 24 amps. That size doesn't exist, so you need to go up to a 30. That means you'll also need a 30 amp breaker. As for the 4 wires, contact Arnold at Paragon or the folks at Euclid's. They have experience with those old kils with odd wiring setups.
Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#7 JBaymore

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 09:42 AM


its 115 volt at 19 amps and uses 2200 watts

i bought today a plug for it and a 20 amp wall plug to wire in so i can use it.

The real big question now is how do i wire the plug onto the cord????? white to black black to red green to blue idk......

The plug i bought i now found out has three terminal hookups (white black and green) while the cord coming form the kiln has green black white and RED.

What do i do????


First, if the kiln must be on a breaker that is 25% larger than the actual draw. So at 19 amps you need a breaker of about 24 amps. That size doesn't exist, so you need to go up to a 30. That means you'll also need a 30 amp breaker. As for the 4 wires, contact Arnold at Paragon or the folks at Euclid's. They have experience with those old kils with odd wiring setups.



To build on that thought from Neil....... it is not just the BREAKER at the electrical supply box that needs to be sized to handle that level of Amperage load, but very importantly ...THE WIRING IN THE WALLS..... must be installed to carry that amperage too. So you likely need an electrician to check/install the circuit for that kiln. You can't just change out the breaker / fuse on the panel and then hook it to the wall socked changed to fit the kiln's plug. If the gauge of the wiring leading from the panel to the kiln wall outlet is not correct.............. you'll eventually start a fire within the wall structure where the wires are routed.

best,

.......................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#8 Round2potter

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 02:09 AM

Much caution is being taken on house fires.

My plan this far is too try to wire it, and then bring it to my school lab where i know they have the proper setup and testing it; then decide whether or not it is worth getting an electrician to come check things out.

Thanks so much for your input. i'll get in contact with somebody who has been "in the business" for a long time to see what is up.

Thanks again!!

-Burt
"There is no such thing as cheating in clay; So long as it works"




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