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DIY Magnetic Trimming Chuck


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#21 John255

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:32 PM

Dear Buddy,

Happy to hear that you would like to build a mag-trim.

1) If 1/4" magnets are good, would the 1/2" ones be even better, especially for taller items; or is 1/4" more than sufficient?

The 1/4" magnets have quite strong pull when stuck to the steel. In fact three would have probably done the job. However, they are easily adjusted into place by dragging starting with a bit of a twist.

2) Have you made the extension rods for taller items yet, and will they fit within your current wood squares?

I hope to use 1/4" dowels plugged into a 45deg. block that will glue to the top of present blocks. Maybe next week if all goes well.

3) You suggest countersinking the magnets, and they do appear sunken to the surface of the wood in one photo. Countersinking would provide more protection for the magnets I would imagine; but in the last photo, there appears to be a space between the paper and the top piece of wood, suggesting the magnets may be glued onto the surface of the wood. This would seem to be easier than trying to align counter-sunk holes with the magnets resting on the tacks. Am I mis-reading the photos? (Perhaps the third photo shows the initial process before the magnetic attractiveness inspired the last photo????

I started out with countersink, but it was a job to get the right depth not having the proper tools. I know many guys out there didn't think to marry girl carpenters being interested in other skills, so to make the project easy I gave up countersinking and just epoxy the magnets to the blocks. The down side is the magnets scratch the surface of the tin plate which in time may be a rust issue. I've thought of a couple coats of water-base-poly on the tin may offset that, but have not tried it. See attached photo, and BTW, don't forget to use the wax-paper on the jig.

BTW#2, for those of you who are selling casseroles like hot cakes, I should mention that Bailey has two versions of a magnetic system for about $90 that looks very nice and professional, but very impersonal. See link:

http://www.baileypottery.com/potterywheels/quicktrim2.htm

Thanks for your kind comments.



John255

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#22 muddybuddy

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 06:22 PM

Thanks for such a quick reply, John! And for the link to Bailey's magnetic system as well. It was helpful seeing that; but like you, I enjoy the "personal" aspect of DIY . Will place my order for the supplies right away and hope they're not out of stock.

BTW, perhaps a layer of sturdy nail polish (such as Sally Hansen's "Hard as Nails") on the magnets would help prevent their scratching the steel "bat."

If rust does attack the scratches already in your steel plate, try evapo-rust.com. I've had great success with it on some excess tools I stole from my hubby to use in the studio but ended up also using in the garden--and found them much later buried in my compost pile, rusted so badly I thought there was no hope of salvage. See www.evapo-rust.com or www.pricemachine.com. $12.00 for 32 oz.

Many thanks, again, for sharing.
Muddy Buddy

#23 koreyej

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 08:06 PM

I am missing something. Why do you have to build the block, attach the magnets, etc. Why cannot you just use the magnet blocks like on the photo below? They are $0.99 a piece.







Where did you get these magnets?

Korey Averill
ka Studios Pottery

www.kastudios.com


#24 John255

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 08:32 PM

Thanks for such a quick reply, John! And for the link to Bailey's magnetic system as well. It was helpful seeing that; but like you, I enjoy the "personal" aspect of DIY . Will place my order for the supplies right away and hope they're not out of stock.

BTW, perhaps a layer of sturdy nail polish (such as Sally Hansen's "Hard as Nails") on the magnets would help prevent their scratching the steel "bat."

If rust does attack the scratches already in your steel plate, try evapo-rust.com. I've had great success with it on some excess tools I stole from my hubby to use in the studio but ended up also using in the garden--and found them much later buried in my compost pile, rusted so badly I thought there was no hope of salvage. See www.evapo-rust.com or www.pricemachine.com. $12.00 for 32 oz.

Many thanks, again, for sharing.
Muddy Buddy



Whoops!
Muddy "Buddy" I thought you were a man.
Good info on the rust chemicals.
Thanks for that. Hope we don't have to use it.
Let us know how your build comes along.
John255
John255

#25 John255

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 08:34 PM


I am missing something. Why do you have to build the block, attach the magnets, etc. Why cannot you just use the magnet blocks like on the photo below? They are $0.99 a piece.







Where did you get these magnets?



Koreye,
Please see the beginning post for links to everything.
John255


John255

#26 Claypple

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 01:18 AM


I am missing something. Why do you have to build the block, attach the magnets, etc. Why cannot you just use the magnet blocks like on the photo below? They are $0.99 a piece.







Where did you get these magnets?


Harbor Freight store, but they work only if you have a steel wheel. Otherwise follow John255 instructions.

http://www.harborfre...nets-97504.html

#27 yedrow

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:47 AM

Great idea! Thanks.

Joel.

#28 INYA

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 03:15 AM

Thanks for really great idea!
And I love your avatar John255 Posted Image
.......................

skratblog.blogspot.com
www.skrat.eu

#29 John255

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 08:53 AM

Thank you Joel and Inya for your kind comments.
John255
John255

#30 John255

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 08:54 AM

To all members who are thinking of building a Magnetic Trimmer,

My attempts to build simple extensions for trimming tall pots were complicated.

Another approach I use successfully is to throw a double-ended trimming chuck and bisque

it then center it on the mag-trim. (See photo) Dimensions are not critical.

I use a bulls-eye level to level the pot in the chuck. (This assumes your wheel is level.)

You could also buy a set of extensions from Bailey for about $16 and screw then to the mag-trim blocks.

http://www.baileypot.../quicktrim2.htm

Good luck with your Mag-trim, and let us know how it goes.

John255

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#31 Denice

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 09:03 AM

John I received my quiche pan and then had to wait on the magnets, I haven't got started on this project yet I have another one that I'm trying to finish first. I always have a lot of projects to do, the only way I can stay organized is to finish one before I start another. Denice

#32 John255

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 08:27 AM

I'm wondering how many people built a Mag-Trim and are too shy to post how it is working?

Can potters be bashful about showing their work???

I use mine just about every day and it's holding up well.

Regards,

John255


John255

#33 JLowes

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 09:03 AM

When i was looking for the $0.99 magents, I noticed the sidebar saying that Harbor Freight is also a source for the neodymium magnets as well, 10 for $2.99:

 

http://www.harborfre...nets-67488.html

 

The Harbor Freight magnets are a little larger, 5/16" diameter by 1/8" thick.  Unit price though they are over $0.03 more per unit, but you don't have to buy 30.  Unfortunately, they are packaged 10 to a package, so you would need two packs, but save $2.01 and still have spares.

 

John



#34 John255

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 09:48 AM

John,

Magnet info like this is very attractive.

No matter which magnets you buy you'll be stuck with them.

People who love magnets should stick together.

John255


John255

#35 nigich22

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 09:38 PM

I love this and will be building one soon. I but I am gonna cut up an old acrylic cutting board to make the blocks instead of using wood. seems like it will work just as well and moisture will never be an issue, not that it would be much of one by the trimming stage anyway.



#36 John255

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 06:23 PM

Nigich22,

I can't see why the cutting board would not work if it's thick enough.

I have one set of blocks 3/4" thick and another set slightly thinner than 1/2".

I've used worn out acrylic cutting boards to make dies for extrusion, and they seem to work better than metal.

Good luck with your project.

John255


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