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DIY Magnetic Trimming Chuck


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#1 John255

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 09:12 AM

The Magnetic Trimming Chuck can be a weekend project if you have a few hand tools and some experience cutting sheet metal. The 11.5" diameter steel disc is cut from galvanized sheet stock bought a Home Depot for $4. Although I didn't try it, you could probably get the same result using the bottom of a 11" two-part quiche (steel not aluminum) baking dish bought from a kitchen shop or Amazon, and forgo the cutting.

The steel disc is glued to any 12" bat that already fits your wheel. I stuck mine together with strong double sided sticky tape. Four 1/4" Neodymium magnets are countersunk and epoxied to three 1.75" square pine blocks. (See photos) Dimensions are not critical, but it is a bit of a trick to keep the magnets from jumping together during assembly. The blocks were faced with scrap foam Gripper Pad, but any medium stiff foam can be used.

So far the magnet trimming holder works well and is somewhat easier than using clay wads. I have yet to make up a set of extension dowel rods for holding tall pieces, but will get to it soon. This device is about 1/10 the cost of Giffin Grip and can be used on pots of any shape. Good luck and let us know how it goes, and if you have improvements. Please see edit below.
John255

11" Steel Quiche Pan:

http://www.amazon.co...s=steel+pie+pan

Magnets:

http://www.amazon.co.../ref=pd_cp_hi_1

Gripper Pads:

http://www.amazon.co...seller=&sr=1-65


Edit:#1

Hardest part of project is epoxying magnets, so I've added a magnet assembly jig. The photos show how to use it to make the three magnetic blocks. When chuck is finished first center your pot then slide the blocks to hold the pot. Not much pressure is needed.

Edit #2
To all members who are thinking of building a Magnetic Trimmer,

My attempts to build simple extensions for trimming tall pots were complicated.

Another approach I use successfully is to throw a double-ended trimming chuck and bisque

it then center it on the mag-trim. (See photo) Dimensions are not critical.

I use a bulls-eye level to level the pot in the chuck. (This assumes your wheel is level.)

You could also buy a set of extensions from Bailey for about $16 and screw then to the mag-trim blocks.

http://www.baileypot.../quicktrim2.htm

Good luck with your Mag-trim, and let us know how it goes.

John255

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John255

#2 Benzine

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 10:00 AM

Very clever. I'm guessing those magnets are quite strong.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#3 John255

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 12:33 PM

Very clever. I'm guessing those magnets are quite strong.


Benzine,
Thanks for the comment.
Yes, the Neodymium magnets are quite strong.
I think three on each block would have been enough, but the extra strength may come in handy when using the extensions for tall pots.
John255


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#4 Diz

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 08:01 PM

Great idea!! Thanks John 255 - now our Art Center can have a couple new trimming chucks - Griffins are too expensive for our budget.

Diz

#5 Jo-Ann

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 09:10 PM

Love it, Great idea John

#6 Bill T.

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 10:54 PM

Great idea, going to make me one, but what did you use to face the block side that touches the pot?

#7 docweathers

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 11:15 PM

Very clever

Larry

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#8 John255

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 09:14 AM

Diz, Jo-Ann, Docweathers,
Thank you for the kind comments. Makes it more enjoyable.
John255

Giltex58,
The blocks were faced with Grabber Pad material stuck on with doble sided tape.
Good luck with your chuck. Let us know how it goes.
John255
John255

#9 Denice

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 11:21 AM

John I'm making one too, I ordered the magnets off of EBay and the quiche pan off of Amazon but it got back ordered. It looked like a project I could handle by myself. My husband whose in the engineering field dismissed it at first, then took a closer look at it and the griffin grip system and decided that yours could work. I'm anxiously waiting for my components to arrive. Denice

#10 docweathers

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 12:34 PM

I have used those rare earth magnets on some projects myself and I'm always amazed and sometimes frustrated by how well they stick.

do you have any difficulty getting the magnets to slide on the pan to adjust to the diameter of your pot.

I have ones on the side of my propane tanks to mark the icing point/ propane level so that I can tell next time I go to fire (after the ice is gone) how much propane I have left. I slide them down as my propane level drops, but sometimes it can be fairly difficult to move even the little ones.

Larry

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#11 John255

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 02:08 PM

John I'm making one too, I ordered the magnets off of EBay and the quiche pan off of Amazon but it got back ordered. It looked like a project I could handle by myself. My husband whose in the engineering field dismissed it at first, then took a closer look at it and the griffin grip system and decided that yours could work. I'm anxiously waiting for my components to arrive. Denice


Denice,
I'm glad to have someone actually making up a Mag-Trim.
I'm making two more and also have the pans on backorder.
I can tell you from experience that it does work.
It also has the advantage over Giffin that any shape pot can be held securely, even a square one.
However, you must first center the pot visually and then set the magnetic blocks by sliding them.
Please let me know if you have questions about assembly.
It is important to hammer the carpet tacks down flush on the magnet assemble jig.
It will also help if you sand the jig flat so that all of the heads of the tacks ar the same height.
Good luck, and let us know how it goes.
John255





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#12 John255

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 02:21 PM

I have used those rare earth magnets on some projects myself and I'm always amazed and sometimes frustrated by how well they stick.

do you have any difficulty getting the magnets to slide on the pan to adjust to the diameter of your pot.

I have ones on the side of my propane tanks to mark the icing point/ propane level so that I can tell next time I go to fire (after the ice is gone) how much propane I have left. I slide them down as my propane level drops, but sometimes it can be fairly difficult to move even the little ones.


Docweathers,
The earth magnets are indeed powerful.
I used four magnets on each block because the extension arms for tall pots will apply some tilting leverage.
The blocks will slide without too much effort, and so far seem manageable. Slight rotation helps start the slide.
However, three magnets would probably be adequate if the extensions are not used.
Another advantage of the Mag-Trim is it is easy and cheap to make as many custom blocks as you need for odd shaped pots.
John255





John255

#13 John255

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:01 PM

John I'm making one too, I ordered the magnets off of EBay and the quiche pan off of Amazon but it got back ordered. It looked like a project I could handle by myself. My husband whose in the engineering field dismissed it at first, then took a closer look at it and the griffin grip system and decided that yours could work. I'm anxiously waiting for my components to arrive. Denice


Denice,
The quiche pans have arrived from Amazon and I've completed two more mag-grips.
The 11" pan bottoms are fairly thick gauge steel and they work just fine, so this is easier/safer than cutting tin.
Hope you have started on your project.
John255

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#14 Claypple

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 11:00 PM

I am missing something. Why do you have to build the block, attach the magnets, etc. Why cannot you just use the magnet blocks like on the photo below? They are $0.99 a piece.

Attached File  100_1850.JPG   664.44KB   48 downloads





#15 docweathers

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 11:51 PM

Where do you get such magnets for $.99 each? Please give a link to the supplier.

Larry

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#16 Claypple

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:12 AM

Where do you get such magnets for $.99 each? Please give a link to the supplier.


At Harbor Freight stores:
http://www.harborfre...nets-97504.html

#17 Mark C.

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:33 AM

I am missing something. Why do you have to build the block, attach the magnets, etc. Why cannot you just use the magnet blocks like on the photo below? They are $0.99 a piece.

Attached File  100_1850.JPG   664.44KB   48 downloads





Most wheel heads are aluminum not steel so magnets will not stick well . The wood blocks make for a larger softer easy to grab unit with padded ends on the clay.
I am guessing all this from the photos as I never have made any of this.
Mark
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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#18 Claypple

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:28 AM

I didn't realize there are aluminum wheels too. Of course it wouldn't work on them at all. Mine is made of steel.

#19 John255

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 09:18 AM

Nice to see the thread come alive.
Good to hear from all of you.
A steel wheel head would be some advantage in going magnetic.
I've never seen one, all of the wheels I've owned were aluminium. Interesting.
The theme of the project is DIY for those who enjoy making their own tools.
I think I enjoy that about as much as making pots.
Cheers,
John255
John255

#20 muddybuddy

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:27 PM

John,
This is a wonderful idea. Thank you so much for sharing! I usually trim without using clay lugs, but there have been a few times when I've coveted a Giffin Grip but couldn't justify the cost. You've made the perfect solution! Can't wait to make one. I have your links (for ordering pan and magnets) on my screen, but three questions come to mind:

1) If 1/4" magnets are good, would the 1/2" ones be even better, especially for taller items; or is 1/4" more than sufficient?

2) Have you made the extension rods for taller items yet, and will they fit within your current wood squares?

3) You suggest countersinking the magnets, and they do appear sunken to the surface of the wood in one photo. Countersinking would provide more protection for the magnets I would imagine; but in the last photo, there appears to be a space between the paper and the top piece of wood, suggesting the magnets may be glued onto the surface of the wood. This would seem to be easier than trying to align counter-sunk holes with the magnets resting on the tacks. Am I mis-reading the photos? (Perhaps the third photo shows the initial process before the magnetic attractiveness inspired the last photo????

Thanks again for such a creative idea. I look forward to hearing from you.
Muddy Buddy




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