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High Bridge Pottery

Going against the norm

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So while fueling my hunger for anything youtube I came across this video, the way he turned the pots just made me burst out laughing laugh.gif Once I had recovered it actually inspired me, he hand trims the tea bowl and I just had to share it. I have never seen anybody else do it this way.

 

(skip to 4 minutes to the part I am talking about)

 

 

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So while fueling my hunger for anything youtube I came across this video, the way he turned the pots just made me burst out laughing laugh.gif Once I had recovered it actually inspired me, he hand trims the tea bowl and I just had to share it. I have never seen anybody else do it this way.

 

(skip to 4 minutes to the part I am talking about)

 

 

 

 

It's actually a fairly normal technique in roughly done / eccentric (in the technical sense, not as in odd) forms like this. Especially in Japanese / Eastern Asian pottery. Trimming a foot on the wheel would have a) Been difficult bc the form isn't centerable, b.) Would have looked odd compared to the irregularity of the form.

 

Personally, I do this on very tall vases that I don't have chucks for. I'm doing a lot of 2ft+ thrown tall/narrow vases right now, and it's easier to just turn them upside down on some foam and trim by hand. It will never be perfect, but you can get very close.

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It is not "against the norm". That is the way that most non-Ido style real Chawan are trimmed. I had my Sensei in Japan spend a lot of time getting me to do that reasonably well. It is not easy to get a good foot for a Chawan.

 

The tool of choice for me a lot of the time (taught to me in Japan) is simply a piece of bamboo that looks like a small ruler. Then a sharp knife is used to "split" it lengthwise along the "business edge" on one side. Then the rectangular bamboo knife is used to cut away the foot.

 

Sometimes I also use a kanna but not on the wheel.....unless it is Ido style bowl.

 

The kodai (foot) is a very important part of a Chawan for Chanoyu (Tea Ceremony) use.

 

 

 

I know Cory...... he knows what he is doing. Makes nice Chawan.

 

best,

 

.....................john

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I also trim my Chawan foot by hand. Like John said it's not easy to make a good foot.

Cory lives a few miles from me and he makes beautiful Chawans.

Go on the WEB and look up Chawan for the Tea Ceremony.

 

Aloha, Ken

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JB, why are there no Baymore demo videos on youtube ?!?

 

 

It is not "against the norm". That is the way that most non-Ido style real Chawan are trimmed. I had my Sensei in Japan spend a lot of time getting me to do that reasonably well. It is not easy to get a good foot for a Chawan.

 

The tool of choice for me a lot of the time (taught to me in Japan) is simply a piece of bamboo that looks like a small ruler. Then a sharp knife is used to "split" it lengthwise along the "business edge" on one side. Then the rectangular bamboo knife is used to cut away the foot.

 

Sometimes I also use a kanna but not on the wheel.....unless it is Ido style bowl.

 

The kodai (foot) is a very important part of a Chawan for Chanoyu (Tea Ceremony) use.

 

 

 

I know Cory...... he knows what he is doing. Makes nice Chawan.

 

best,

 

.....................john

 

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JB, why are there no Baymore demo videos on youtube ?!?

 

Tim,

 

Well........ because I am almost 64 years old, don't have video gear or a decent editing suite, and as a full time woodfiring potter and college faculty member, I simply don't have the time to put that kind of stuff together.

 

If I did it..... it'd have to be very professional quality to meet my personal standards....and I don't have the pro video skills to do what I'd want. It is all I can do to keep up with the online media that I do try to undertake along with making a living in ceramics.

 

When I do things like present at NCECA, do workshops, and teach at the college folks get to see what I'm about. (I think someone shot some footage when I presented at the Alabama Clay Conference a while ago. And there is quite a bit of footage that has been shot when I've been working in in Japan by folks like NHK and other media types -sorry......Japanese language only and ownded by them-.)

 

I have NO idea how people have the time to do all that Youtube video work. I've done enough on-camera talent TV work and also a bit of video editing to know that it is a SLOW process to put that stuff togehter.

 

"Damn it Jim, I'm a potter not a videographer".

 

best,

 

.................john

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