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Artwork is Work


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#1 bciskepottery

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:47 AM

Great bumper sticker.

#2 Pres

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 10:17 AM

Great bumper sticker.


Reminds me of the attitude of peers in college that were not in studio classes. Oh would you do this for me, you don't have to study, and it only needs a few hours!

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#3 TJR

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 09:03 AM


Great bumper sticker.


Reminds me of the attitude of peers in college that were not in studio classes. Oh would you do this for me, you don't have to study, and it only needs a few hours!


Pres;
I once was sitting in the staff room eating my lunch. Another teacher came in and said;" Draw me an elephant!". Not, "Tom would you be able to draw me an elephant, please."
My reply was; and I quote- "Sorry, but I am not a tap that I can turn my talent on and off. I can't just instantly produce stuff." [As in turning on a faucet and art work comes out].
The man walked away in dismay. He was young, though. Others knew that I was not a tap. They also knew not to bug me when I was eating lunch, as it was my only down time.
TJRPosted ImagePosted Image
I am going to try to use ALL the emoticoms.
T.

#4 Pres

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 09:29 AM



Great bumper sticker.


Reminds me of the attitude of peers in college that were not in studio classes. Oh would you do this for me, you don't have to study, and it only needs a few hours!


Pres;
I once was sitting in the staff room eating my lunch. Another teacher came in and said;" Draw me an elephant!". Not, "Tom would you be able to draw me an elephant, please."
My reply was; and I quote- "Sorry, but I am not a tap that I can turn my talent on and off. I can't just instantly produce stuff." [As in turning on a faucet and art work comes out].
The man walked away in dismay. He was young, though. Others knew that I was not a tap. They also knew not to bug me when I was eating lunch, as it was my only down time.
TJRPosted ImagePosted Image
I am going to try to use ALL the emoticoms.
T.


One of the reasons I started eating in my room. Another was that I couldn't put up with the griping by folks that were unhappy with the career they had chosen, or about this kid or that. My basement computer room ended up with a fridge and a coffee pot. These with the blessings of the administration as I was 10 minutes away from the cafeteria, and only had a 25 minute break between classes, of course I had to fight for it. Was scheduled at 30, but had to be at classroom hallway 5 min before classes. Count that plus cleanup for next class-mmmmm not much time.


Thinking back to the bumper sticker-Art is work, but that really doesn't say it all does it!? To me, Art is arduous, emotional, consuming, passionate work! How many other descriptors can we add to this most wonderful form of Work?

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#5 Benzine

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 06:07 PM

"One of the reasons I started eating in my room. Another was that I couldn't put up with the griping by folks that were unhappy with the career they had chosen, or about this kid or that."

I'm with you Pres. I have only eaten in a teacher's lounge, on a hand-full of occasions. I started eating in my room, the first day, of my first job, for the reasons you mentioned.

And TJR, I can relate, to others, teachers and students, expecting you to produce anything, on a moments notice. It's almost as to say, "Well, you don't really teach a class, and you are therefore, never busy, so go ahead and get this taken care of, for a class that actually matters."
I also, like how the art room, is apparently the material depository, for the entire building.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#6 Natania

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 08:40 PM




Great bumper sticker.


Reminds me of the attitude of peers in college that were not in studio classes. Oh would you do this for me, you don't have to study, and it only needs a few hours!


Pres;
I once was sitting in the staff room eating my lunch. Another teacher came in and said;" Draw me an elephant!". Not, "Tom would you be able to draw me an elephant, please."
My reply was; and I quote- "Sorry, but I am not a tap that I can turn my talent on and off. I can't just instantly produce stuff." [As in turning on a faucet and art work comes out].
The man walked away in dismay. He was young, though. Others knew that I was not a tap. They also knew not to bug me when I was eating lunch, as it was my only down time.
TJRPosted ImagePosted Image
I am going to try to use ALL the emoticoms.
T.


One of the reasons I started eating in my room. Another was that I couldn't put up with the griping by folks that were unhappy with the career they had chosen, or about this kid or that. My basement computer room ended up with a fridge and a coffee pot. These with the blessings of the administration as I was 10 minutes away from the cafeteria, and only had a 25 minute break between classes, of course I had to fight for it. Was scheduled at 30, but had to be at classroom hallway 5 min before classes. Count that plus cleanup for next class-mmmmm not much time.


Thinking back to the bumper sticker-Art is work, but that really doesn't say it all does it!? To me, Art is arduous, emotional, consuming, passionate work! How many other descriptors can we add to this most wonderful form of Work?




I also eat lunch in my room mostly because I found a lot of complaining and griping and negativity in the lunch room. I think of myself as not at all adverse to complaining, but I would leave feeling discouraged. Also need the down time to have 20 min. Of quiet and organize my thoughts, myself, remember this kid's special request, or that kid's difficulty with a project, etc. art is work, and art teaching is work, but how you approach both makes a big difference in the how rewarding the work is.

#7 Pres

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 10:09 PM





Great bumper sticker.


Reminds me of the attitude of peers in college that were not in studio classes. Oh would you do this for me, you don't have to study, and it only needs a few hours!


Pres;
I once was sitting in the staff room eating my lunch. Another teacher came in and said;" Draw me an elephant!". Not, "Tom would you be able to draw me an elephant, please."
My reply was; and I quote- "Sorry, but I am not a tap that I can turn my talent on and off. I can't just instantly produce stuff." [As in turning on a faucet and art work comes out].
The man walked away in dismay. He was young, though. Others knew that I was not a tap. They also knew not to bug me when I was eating lunch, as it was my only down time.
TJRPosted ImagePosted Image
I am going to try to use ALL the emoticoms.
T.


One of the reasons I started eating in my room. Another was that I couldn't put up with the griping by folks that were unhappy with the career they had chosen, or about this kid or that. My basement computer room ended up with a fridge and a coffee pot. These with the blessings of the administration as I was 10 minutes away from the cafeteria, and only had a 25 minute break between classes, of course I had to fight for it. Was scheduled at 30, but had to be at classroom hallway 5 min before classes. Count that plus cleanup for next class-mmmmm not much time.


Thinking back to the bumper sticker-Art is work, but that really doesn't say it all does it!? To me, Art is arduous, emotional, consuming, passionate work! How many other descriptors can we add to this most wonderful form of Work?




I also eat lunch in my room mostly because I found a lot of complaining and griping and negativity in the lunch room. I think of myself as not at all adverse to complaining, but I would leave feeling discouraged. Also need the down time to have 20 min. Of quiet and organize my thoughts, myself, remember this kid's special request, or that kid's difficulty with a project, etc. art is work, and art teaching is work, but how you approach both makes a big difference in the how rewarding the work is.



All teaching is hard work, but it seems those of us in the arts deal with our stress inherently with our art. Others don't have such an outlet and need it.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#8 Benzine

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 10:25 AM

"All teaching is hard work, but it seems those of us in the arts deal with our stress inherently with our art. Others don't have such an outlet and need it."

Each content area, has its own set of difficulties. I have always said, I don't know how English teachers, can read/ grade all of those papers. I've had students, do reports before, and I did not enjoy grading them.

With that said, not many other teachers, have to deal with the prep that is involved, with Art courses. When I taught on an eight period schedule, I found that my one prep, was being used to pug clay, mix glaze, cut photo paper and mix photo chemicals. Then, if I had time, which I usually didn't, I could grade projects.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#9 Pres

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 10:48 AM

"All teaching is hard work, but it seems those of us in the arts deal with our stress inherently with our art. Others don't have such an outlet and need it."

Each content area, has its own set of difficulties. I have always said, I don't know how English teachers, can read/ grade all of those papers. I've had students, do reports before, and I did not enjoy grading them.

With that said, not many other teachers, have to deal with the prep that is involved, with Art courses. When I taught on an eight period schedule, I found that my one prep, was being used to pug clay, mix glaze, cut photo paper and mix photo chemicals. Then, if I had time, which I usually didn't, I could grade projects.


Amen to all of that!

Back to the bumper sticker, and not to hijack the post, but there ought to be a bumper sticker "Teaching is work! Especially this day and age where we seem to be getting the blunt of cuts, and considered to be easy jobs since most of us in the states teach 180 days for 365 days of salary. College profs often teach part time loads in the eyes of many. Known of this takes into account the hours of preparation, time spent doing paper work, and post graduate education not to mention the dreaded "In Service" time.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#10 Benzine

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 09:28 PM

Of course teaching is easy. Only 180 days a year right? 8-4ish or so right? Except for all the extra time, that most teacher put in. Professional Development days, coming in early, staying late, taking work home etc.

And then there's the whole, "Those, who can't do, teach." Really? If you don't think, that a teacher is capable of "doing", the material they cover, then you might want to notify the school administration. Math teachers, know how to do math, science teachers science, etc.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#11 TJR

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 09:26 AM

Hey,guys;
I think we have rassled the post away to teaching again. Things are a little different in Canada. We teach 200 days-but that includes inservice days. I have a 55 minute uninterrupted lunch break. Principals are not allowed to schedule meetings on lunch. Therefore I have a department head meeting at 7:15 a.m once a month. I am not a morning person.
Because I am the dept. head for fine art [9 teachers], I am able to schedule my classes for the next year.We have two semesters with a total of seven classes for the year. One semester I teach 4 ,75 minute classes, the next semester I teach 3. You never see the teachers that are on their[four], as they are way too busy. We have two full time art teachers. When she is on her 3, I am on four.
When I schedule the classes,Benzine, I try to double two. So I might have grade 10, then grade 9, then another grade 9, then grade 11.That way I can reduce my prep time. I stopped mixing my own glazes two years ago.I was mixing coloured slips and using a clear glaze, but the students wanted reds and oranges, so I gave up and bought jars of glaze.
We have two grade 12 classes. Once is a university entrance class called 40s. [specialized], the other is 40g[generalized]. The first requires a lot of portfolio work and essay writing. The second is more teacher driven.
This is getting long, so I will stop.
TJR.Posted Image

#12 GEP

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 10:40 AM

Hi folks,

I have nothing against "teacher-talk" but please continue this topic by starting a new thread in the Education forum.

Getting back to the bumper sticker ... having just finished a five-day-long show, I'm exhausted, my feet hurt from standing on concrete, my face hurts from talking and smiling so much, and I managed to catch a cold, my reponse to the bumper sticker is "yes it is!"

Mea
Mea Rhee
Good Elephant Pottery
http://www.goodelephant.com

#13 Benzine

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 09:49 PM

Sorry about that. Not to point fingers, but I think that "Benzine" guy started it. Between you and me, he's up to no good around here.

I was just expanding on the idea, that Artwork is indeed work, as many don't believe so, and therefore, don't think Art teachers do anything either. Usually, once a year, I have a student ask, "Did you have to go to school to teach Art?" I always tell them, "Nope, I was just showed up, and was nicely dressed."

I have a lot of respect for those, who make a living selling their work. I decided that path wasn't for me, before I got into ceramics. I've sold a few things on the side, and plan to continue to do so in the future. But I'd personally have a tough time, getting by, with my only source of income, coming from my art work.

I can imagine, especially with ceramicists, selling work can be difficult, especially when consumers will compare it to the mass-produced products, at least in terms of price. Who cares about unique forms and glaze, not to mention build quality, when you can get a whole dinnerware set, for next to nothing at the local super store?
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#14 Pres

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 10:37 PM

Sorry about that. Not to point fingers, but I think that "Benzine" guy started it. Between you and me, he's up to no good around here.

I was just expanding on the idea, that Artwork is indeed work, as many don't believe so, and therefore, don't think Art teachers do anything either. Usually, once a year, I have a student ask, "Did you have to go to school to teach Art?" I always tell them, "Nope, I was just showed up, and was nicely dressed."

I have a lot of respect for those, who make a living selling their work. I decided that path wasn't for me, before I got into ceramics. I've sold a few things on the side, and plan to continue to do so in the future. But I'd personally have a tough time, getting by, with my only source of income, coming from my art work.

I can imagine, especially with ceramicists, selling work can be difficult, especially when consumers will compare it to the mass-produced products, at least in terms of price. Who cares about unique forms and glaze, not to mention build quality, when you can get a whole dinnerware set, for next to nothing at the local super store?



Trouble is that making the art is only a small part of the job! I find it interesting to read the articles in Ceramics Monthly where people talk about the percentage of time to making, to selling, doing paper work, cleaning etc. If we all could just make pots, and they would sell themselves and everything else would fall in place-what a dream! So making Art is work, hard work!

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#15 Karen B

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 09:12 AM

When I lived in Washington Heights in Manhattan, there was a local who had a license plate "ART4BUX". I laughed every time I saw it.

#16 Jess

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:56 PM

Great bumper sticker.


Reminds me of one I saw that said
ART=LIFE




#17 clayshapes

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 08:37 AM

I used to be a television producer, where I worked long hours with lots of tempermental narcissistic people. I was the leader of my teams and had to be a psychologist half the time, managing egos to get what I needed. Then the films/shows went to broadcasters who needed just as much "therapy" to get them to agree to take our work the way we wanted to send it. Plus I was on the road several months a year, often acting like a sherpa to my crews - helping lug heavy bags up mountains to get great shots...etc.

So - that was WORK! (very fun work, at that).

Now I go into my studio every day where I also WORK really hard -- it's physical, mental...and very rewarding. Sometimes I'm on my feet for 4 hours at a time hand brush glazing a dozen pieces to fill a kiln -- after being on my feet a couple hours making pots (slab built - no wheel in my studio - and no slab roller either!). I don't know why I have to stand up the whole time...but I can't seem to get comfortable sitting down to do this work.

Anyway -- the difference between these two kinds of work is at the end of the day, I don't have to manage any egos besides my own, and no one tells me to make a red pot instead of a blue pot. And if they do, I just tell them to make their own!

Nothing like being your own boss, doing work you love with something tangible and beautiful to show for it at the end of the day.

Of course, the other difference is, I actually made a good living making TV, which I will never do making art!! But somehow that doesn't really matter.

#18 robin jack

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Posted 30 March 2013 - 12:33 AM

According to your post artwork is work? So I believe on this artwork is one of the difficult work In all . When I teach to other for simple study I just convey my thoughts my ideas and my personal information in his mind according to lesson. But when I tech to other for artwork then I have to make my understanding with his mind and with his body language. So I thing artwork is really work.

#19 gypsy

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 06:39 PM

According to your post artwork is work? So I believe on this artwork is one of the difficult work In all . When I teach to other for simple study I just convey my thoughts my ideas and my personal information in his mind according to lesson. But when I tech to other for artwork then I have to make my understanding with his mind and with his body language. So I thing artwork is really work.


Pottery and drawing are my only income....I'm poor but serene and happy.




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