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Kintsukuroi Fix


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#1 timbo_heff

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 04:20 PM

Hi,
I have a one of a kind cup with a small hole in the side wall.
It's a kooky artsy yunomi type thing so can't really remake it, I know I should smash it but I love it.
I want to try the trick of filling with gold which I think is called Kintsukuroi.
Does anyone know how to do this?
Can i crumple up gold leaf and pack it in there?
Hoping Baymore San or one of you other masters out there might know.
I could fill with epoxy I guess but I doesn't seem right somehow.
Again, I know I should let go and smash it but I really would like to save it if possible.

Thanks!
Tim

#2 justanassembler

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 04:39 PM

Hi,
I have a one of a kind cup with a small hole in the side wall.
It's a kooky artsy yunomi type thing so can't really remake it, I know I should smash it but I love it.
I want to try the trick of filling with gold which I think is called Kintsukuroi.
Does anyone know how to do this?
Can i crumple up gold leaf and pack it in there?
Hoping Baymore San or one of you other masters out there might know.
I could fill with epoxy I guess but I doesn't seem right somehow.
Again, I know I should let go and smash it but I really would like to save it if possible.

Thanks!
Tim


If I'm not mistaken the technique is actually using a laquer resin sprinkled with gold, not actually filling the cracks with gold...

I cant vouch for the efficacy or authenticity of the information contained in these links, but a google search yielded these:
http://nanbanceramic.../2011/08/17/86/
http://www.thewomens...ke-do-and-mend/

#3 JBaymore

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 10:41 AM

Tim,

Here I am......... ;)src="http://ceramicartsda...ault/wink.gif"> .


The technique is to glue the cracked pieces together or fill in the break with a layer of what ius called urushi (Japanese lacquer, and then do one of two things.......

One way the gold is added is to mix 24 karat gold powder with the urushi before the patching is done. This means that the gold appearance is throughout the lacquer repair. This is the more durable method,.... but the more expensive.

The second method is to let the surface of the urushi projecting on the surface of the piece to get partiallly dry and "tacky"..... and then press gold leaf onto the surface to put a thin layer of gold there. Cheaper, but easier to wear off.

It is VERY, VERY, VERY important to stress here that actual urushi is the sap from a plant/tree that is sort of related to Poison Ivy/Sumac... and gives you a HORRIBLE rash. Lacquerware apprentices in Japan suffer for years until they develop an immunity.

SO that being said.... here is the English language page for a small kit that is all you need to do this:

http://www.mejiro-ja...intsugi-diy-set


It is not as easy as it sounds. Things like the humidity of the air will ghreatly affect the drying of the lacquer. As always........ test, test, test.

best,

......................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#4 timbo_heff

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 02:36 PM

Thank you both.
Hmmm ... looks not that fun .... maybe I'll just epoxy or maybe I'll step it up and smash the thing after all :)

#5 justanassembler

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:45 AM

Thank you both.
Hmmm ... looks not that fun .... maybe I'll just epoxy or maybe I'll step it up and smash the thing after all Posted Image


make your own hammer, it makes the smashing that much more fun ;)

#6 Round2potter

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 12:56 AM

I have used the saying many times in the studio "bisque fire it first, it makes a better noise"
"There is no such thing as cheating in clay; So long as it works"

#7 GloriaGypsy

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 06:50 PM

Tim,

Here I am......... ;)src="http://ceramicartsda...ault/wink.gif"> .


The technique is to glue the cracked pieces together or fill in the break with a layer of what ius called urushi (Japanese lacquer, and then do one of two things.......

One way the gold is added is to mix 24 karat gold powder with the urushi before the patching is done. This means that the gold appearance is throughout the lacquer repair. This is the more durable method,.... but the more expensive.

The second method is to let the surface of the urushi projecting on the surface of the piece to get partiallly dry and "tacky"..... and then press gold leaf onto the surface to put a thin layer of gold there. Cheaper, but easier to wear off.

It is VERY, VERY, VERY important to stress here that actual urushi is the sap from a plant/tree that is sort of related to Poison Ivy/Sumac... and gives you a HORRIBLE rash. Lacquerware apprentices in Japan suffer for years until they develop an immunity.

SO that being said.... here is the English language page for a small kit that is all you need to do this:

http://www.mejiro-ja...intsugi-diy-set


It is not as easy as it sounds. Things like the humidity of the air will ghreatly affect the drying of the lacquer. As always........ test, test, test.

best,

......................john


Can this technique work to repair glass?

#8 JBaymore

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 11:40 AM


Tim,

Here I am......... ;)src="http://ceramicartsda...ault/wink.gif"> .


The technique is to glue the cracked pieces together or fill in the break with a layer of what ius called urushi (Japanese lacquer, and then do one of two things.......

One way the gold is added is to mix 24 karat gold powder with the urushi before the patching is done. This means that the gold appearance is throughout the lacquer repair. This is the more durable method,.... but the more expensive.

The second method is to let the surface of the urushi projecting on the surface of the piece to get partiallly dry and "tacky"..... and then press gold leaf onto the surface to put a thin layer of gold there. Cheaper, but easier to wear off.

It is VERY, VERY, VERY important to stress here that actual urushi is the sap from a plant/tree that is sort of related to Poison Ivy/Sumac... and gives you a HORRIBLE rash. Lacquerware apprentices in Japan suffer for years until they develop an immunity.

SO that being said.... here is the English language page for a small kit that is all you need to do this:

http://www.mejiro-ja...intsugi-diy-set


It is not as easy as it sounds. Things like the humidity of the air will ghreatly affect the drying of the lacquer. As always........ test, test, test.

best,

......................john


Can this technique work to repair glass?



Probably..... you'd have to test it though.

best,

.............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#9 sparroweye

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:39 PM

My link I am curious. Just getting into ceramic's. I have very old ceramic fired hand-painted china done by my grandmother almost 50 years ago.
My link It looks
like oils on china but she also had gold fired on the edges. It is real gold leaf mainly on edges of plates. But my favorite plate had something heavy on it
and cracked in half. My husband glued it back but it left an ugly glue line. I am wondering if I can do the kintsukuroi on the break. But I think it may be
too late as the glue may be permanent. And I would like to try china painting. I do not have a kiln nor at my age want to invest in one. But I think
there are new classes in china painting. Where I could use their kiln.

#10 futurebird

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 01:29 PM



Tim,

Here I am......... ;)src="http://ceramicartsda...ault/wink.gif"> .


The technique is to glue the cracked pieces together or fill in the break with a layer of what ius called urushi (Japanese lacquer, and then do one of two things.......

One way the gold is added is to mix 24 karat gold powder with the urushi before the patching is done. This means that the gold appearance is throughout the lacquer repair. This is the more durable method,.... but the more expensive.

The second method is to let the surface of the urushi projecting on the surface of the piece to get partiallly dry and "tacky"..... and then press gold leaf onto the surface to put a thin layer of gold there. Cheaper, but easier to wear off.

It is VERY, VERY, VERY important to stress here that actual urushi is the sap from a plant/tree that is sort of related to Poison Ivy/Sumac... and gives you a HORRIBLE rash. Lacquerware apprentices in Japan suffer for years until they develop an immunity.

SO that being said.... here is the English language page for a small kit that is all you need to do this:

http://www.mejiro-ja...intsugi-diy-set


It is not as easy as it sounds. Things like the humidity of the air will ghreatly affect the drying of the lacquer. As always........ test, test, test.

best,

......................john


Can this technique work to repair glass?



Probably..... you'd have to test it though.

best,

.............john


John I think you might know but I've done a lot of research on this ... and what you say is true the worst thing is that the reactions is

TIME DELAYED BY UP TO THREE DAYS

so you can think it's fine and there is no reaction then three days later it's hive city!

I still have some repairs I need to do but I'll have on long gloves and a vapor mask.

I'm not really allergic to poinsen IVY, but this stuff is concentrated.
www.futurebird.com

#11 Mati

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 02:35 PM

Could this method be imitated somehow by filling the cracks with some other metal element? I have a beautiful platter that was fine in the bisque fire but in the glaze fire a huge wide crack opened up down the middle.... I want to fill it with a metal of some sort... but I have no idea how to do that. Any suggestions how would be appreciated. :)



#12 timbo_heff

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 12:23 PM

A friend of mine says me does some filling (not repaing breaks, but filling small holes with PMC.

Says it works well: Anyone else tried that?



#13 JBaymore

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 09:09 AM

Tim,

PMC shrinks a LOT from raw to fired. Not sure HOW that person gets this to fill in the spaces.

best,

...............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com




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