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#1 groggy

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 08:53 PM

Hello ceramic community. I am considering purchasing a used kiln wired for 3 phase 208 v. my studio is in a commercial building with 208. however I want to use the kiln as a single phase as I only fire to cone 05. can it be converted? Thanks

#2 neilestrick

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 11:18 AM

The phase has no bearing whatsoever on how hot you plan to fire. If you can wire up 3 phase in your studio, then do it. The cost of firing will be the same, but the lower amperage will mean less draw from your main panel, leaving room for more kilns! If you NEED to rewire because you don't have three phase in your studio, then it depends on the kiln whether or not it can be done easily. Contact the manufacturer to see what's involved. It will draw more amperage at single phase, so the current wiring may not be adequate.

Neil Estrick
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Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

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#3 groggy

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 09:49 AM

The phase has no bearing whatsoever on how hot you plan to fire. If you can wire up 3 phase in your studio, then do it. The cost of firing will be the same, but the lower amperage will mean less draw from your main panel, leaving room for more kilns! If you NEED to rewire because you don't have three phase in your studio, then it depends on the kiln whether or not it can be done easily. Contact the manufacturer to see what's involved. It will draw more amperage at single phase, so the current wiring may not be adequate.


Thank you! Coincidentally, the kiln in question is an L&L easyfire 28. Will it have to be rewired because I am cannot access the 3 phase in my studio?

#4 neilestrick

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 10:18 AM


The phase has no bearing whatsoever on how hot you plan to fire. If you can wire up 3 phase in your studio, then do it. The cost of firing will be the same, but the lower amperage will mean less draw from your main panel, leaving room for more kilns! If you NEED to rewire because you don't have three phase in your studio, then it depends on the kiln whether or not it can be done easily. Contact the manufacturer to see what's involved. It will draw more amperage at single phase, so the current wiring may not be adequate.


Thank you! Coincidentally, the kiln in question is an L&L easyfire 28. Will it have to be rewired because I am cannot access the 3 phase in my studio?


Yes, it will need to be rewired. The amperage will increase to 48 amps (60 amp breaker). CLICK HERE for instructions.



Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

[email protected]


#5 Pres

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 01:15 PM



The phase has no bearing whatsoever on how hot you plan to fire. If you can wire up 3 phase in your studio, then do it. The cost of firing will be the same, but the lower amperage will mean less draw from your main panel, leaving room for more kilns! If you NEED to rewire because you don't have three phase in your studio, then it depends on the kiln whether or not it can be done easily. Contact the manufacturer to see what's involved. It will draw more amperage at single phase, so the current wiring may not be adequate.


Thank you! Coincidentally, the kiln in question is an L&L easyfire 28. Will it have to be rewired because I am cannot access the 3 phase in my studio?


Yes, it will need to be rewired. The amperage will increase to 48 amps (60 amp breaker). CLICK HERE for instructions.




All too often a kiln of this sort comes from a school or public institution to a private residence. Many times the people purchasing the kiln have no idea what they are purchasing. You often have to weigh the costs of rewiring against the cost of a good deal.
Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#6 Preagan

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 12:58 PM

Hello,

New to the forum and have searched for answers already given.  Next week I will be having my studio wired for electric.  It is a separate building 50 feet from my home. The plan is to install plenty of receptacles above counter height, wiring overhead for lighting, and one high up on an end wall for a ventilation/exhaust fan.  I would love ideas from others as to what is really important, especially in hindsight!  My kiln room is an attached shed and I am ready to tackle the conversation with the electrician regarding why I want to "over do" the wiring. I also have the kiln manual with wiring recommendations to prove my points. Never know if some day I might get a larger electric kiln, want to be ready. Your kind advice would be greatly appreciated!

 

Penny

Reagan Pottery


Penny

#7 RonSa

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 03:41 PM

The plan is to install plenty of receptacles above counter height

 

A lesson I've learned multiple times is once I determine how many outlets I need I always double the number and always find I wish I had more.



#8 neilestrick

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 05:57 PM

I would post this as a new topic.

 

Lots of power. Have enough for your kiln, and enough for a second small kiln for tests, and enough for a larger kiln in the future. Go ahead and make all the regular outlets 20 amps. 100 amp sub panel at the least, but if you've got a 400 amp main panel then pull 200 out to the studio.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

[email protected]


#9 Dick White

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 07:46 PM

Penny, when your electrician is planning the circuit for the kiln, remind him that a kiln must be on a circuit fully rated for 125% of the nominal amperage stated on the electrical rating plate on the kiln control box. Too often, an electrician having no experience with kilns will install a circuit that apparently matches the stated nominal amperage and then there are problems.



#10 Mark C.

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 07:59 PM

I would post this as a new topic.

 

Lots of power. Have enough for your kiln, and enough for a second small kiln for tests, and enough for a larger kiln in the future. Go ahead and make all the regular outlets 20 amps. 100 amp sub panel at the least, but if you've got a 400 amp main panel then pull 200 out to the studio.

This is spot on for electric kilns

as to the studio just put in twice the number of outlets using 12# wire (20amps) and 20 amp outlets

put extras in the area you want a wheel as you may find you move it around a  bit .


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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#11 oldlady

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 08:10 PM

if you are planning to use this studio alone, not a group of people working at the same time, take note of how many electric appliances are mentioned in some of the posts.  you might want to put several circuits installed with different color outlet covers.  some for the permanent things, radio, other constantly used items, some for those things like a hair dryer or paint gun or a compressor or a pugmill, lights for the photo booth, count them up and add more.  but separate circuits will help keep everything working well.


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#12 Preagan

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 05:39 AM

Thanks to all of you for finding my question and your suggestions! And bear with me, I will learn the proper posting rules, promise. Have a great weekend. Penny
Penny

#13 oldlady

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Posted 14 November 2016 - 09:51 AM

looking around my studio i find things plugged into outlets all over the place.  some of the outlets have those converters holding 6 places to plug in things but in a 2 outlet receptacle.  i work alone so i do not have ten things going at once. the things i use are plugged in all the time in their permanent locations.

 

 i would not take the drill out of the area near the sink where i mix buckets of glaze with the drill and a jiffy mixer.  nor would i move the hair dryer from the long strip near the wheel or the heat gun from the end of the slab roller.  there is another strip with two lights, radio, fan, hand blender and the second radio that plays cds.  a second hand blender is at the sink and hangs about 6 feet above the sink for instant use.

 

you are wise to raise the outlets to useful height.  most of my strips are plugged into outlets that i cannot reach under the slab roller, behind the storage tubs and  in other inaccessible places.  it is amazing to me how many lights i use at differing work stations.  an operating room might have enough light for surgery but i would add another couple of hundred watt bulbs to see details.


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#14 RonSa

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Posted 14 November 2016 - 05:22 PM

One of the things I did in the different types of shop I've built was to have a four socket outlets where the left 2 and the right 2 were on different circuit breakers.



#15 glazenerd

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Posted 14 November 2016 - 10:17 PM

 

200px-NEMA_5-20RA_GFCI_Tamper_Resistant_

Do not forget these special outlets for receptacles closer than six foot to a water source. They also make GFI breakers for the panel box; making all receptacles on that circuit grounded in case of water contact.

 

Nerd



#16 Preagan

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Posted 15 November 2016 - 06:18 AM

I am honored to have access to all this wisdom!!  My electrician listened and I have used your suggestions in my discussion with him.  He "gets it" and as it turns out is a latent artist himself.  I may have found a new friend as well.  He even suggested additional lights over my requirements.  I will keep you posted on the results, he will complete the work this week.

Penny


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