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Inherited glaze materials


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#1 mayaearth

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 08:24 AM

I've recently been given access to a studio full of glaze materials! Is there any concern that certain materials could go bad, or stale, as they've been sitting for several years? Everything has been stored in lidded jars and buckets. Also, a few of the jars have lost their labels. Is there any way to go about identifying the mystery materials?

#2 JBaymore

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 10:27 AM

I've recently been given access to a studio full of glaze materials! Is there any concern that certain materials could go bad, or stale, as they've been sitting for several years? Everything has been stored in lidded jars and buckets. Also, a few of the jars have lost their labels. Is there any way to go about identifying the mystery materials?


Remember that such an "find" may end up being a liability in the end.

The un-labeled buskets are particulary problematic. Technically they are "hazardous waste", since you have no idea what is in them. A white powder could be EPK... or white lead....or lithium carbonate... or barium carbonate.... or even something not at all related to ceramics like pool chlorine .... or fertilizer..... or ?????????. If you have to dispose of them yourself, it will likely cost you..... particulary if you sell your work (are thereby a "business").

Identifying such stuff is certainly possible.... a lab can test them .... but it will not be inexpensive. Glaze materials are cheap.... not going to be worth that expense.

Otherwise.... no, the materials generally do not "go bad". Stuff like organic gums can cake up due to atmospheric moisture... and be such a pain to use that they are worthless. But stuff like feldspars and flint and such generally are OK if they are not seriously wetted. And then if they do get wet....... they'll just clump up and you'll need to seive more carefully after you dry them out and are using them. Clays, if they get wet, will be a bit more problematic..... but possibly could still be used.

If they are really old materials... the materials analysis may not match current materials sources. So some glaze recipes may look a tad different.

best,

.....................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#3 Mark C.

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 12:22 PM

As John said the mystery materials are to expensive to figure out-I would toss them-Label everything NOW so the rest of the labels are permanent and can not fall off.
If these are from a yesteryear you may have some things that are not around much anymore like carbonated lead or white lead both are nasty.

Most materials keep forever. One last note if you know a working potter they may be able to discern one or two of those unidentified materials as a few have certain unique qualities .
Keep them dry.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#4 Mark C.

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 12:24 PM

As John said the mystery materials are to expensive to figure out-I would toss them-Label everything NOW so the rest of the labels are permanent and can not fall off.
If these are from a yesteryear you may have some things that are not around much anymore like carbonated lead or white lead both are nasty.
Most materials keep forever.
One last note if you know a working potter they may be able to discern one or two of those unidentified materials as a few have certain unique qualities Keep them dry.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 06:24 PM

You can not just toss potentially hazardous chemicals. It could get you in trouble, like a big fine from the EPA if you get caught. You could donate it to a local college and maybe they could figure out what they are.
They would also have the means of disposing hazardous chemicals.


Marcia

#6 mayaearth

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 06:55 PM

The unidentified materials are minimal, a few pounds at most. It's good to know that the materials are still good and, of course, I'm starting with test batches.Thanks so much for the response!

#7 Mark C.

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 07:02 PM

The unidentified materials are minimal, a few pounds at most. It's good to know that the materials are still good and, of course, I'm starting with test batches.Thanks so much for the response!


We have a hazard waste drop off twice a year for 5$ they take it in hazmat suits-This service travels around our county.This is what I have done in the past-I did not mean just toss it in trash.You can call your local dump on when this drop off is scheduled.
Mark
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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#8 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 09:33 AM

That is a nice service to have. When I was teaching, the haz-mat office of the campus did regular inspections and provided containers for
hazardous materials.

Marcia

#9 JBaymore

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 11:03 AM

We have a hazard waste drop off twice a year for 5$ they take it in hazmat suits-This service travels around our county.This is what I have done in the past-I did not mean just toss it in trash.You can call your local dump on when this drop off is scheduled.


Wow ... the only kinds of this thing around here are "Household" hazardous waste pickup days twice a year. If you are a business... they won't take the stuff and in fact seriptitiously using it (if you are a buusiness) is illegal.

OK for hobby potters though.

best,

.....................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com




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