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Designation--"Master Potter"


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#61 flowerdry

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Posted 31 July 2015 - 04:26 PM

Since we've gone a bit to the humorous side of things (what a surprise....not), let me just say that "World's greatest Potter" gave me a great idea for a business name:  "World's slowest Potter".


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#62 Rae Reich

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Posted 02 August 2015 - 03:22 AM

I saw a potter at a show who went by the Worlds greatest Potter-make checks out to the worlds greatest Potter the sign said.
I could only get about 20 feet from booth as his ego was about that large. He now goes my another name for his business.
truse story on the name part.
Mark

 
 
That was George E. Ohr, right?  ;)
 
best,
 
...............john

But, Ohr really was a Master Potter, don't you think? With all the criteria we can agree on? An exception, though, like Cellini, who also just knew he was a Master - their bragging rankles, but their skills can't be denied.

#63 dirt poor

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Posted 13 January 2016 - 09:21 PM

 

 

I saw a potter at a show who went by the Worlds greatest Potter-make checks out to the worlds greatest Potter the sign said.
I could only get about 20 feet from booth as his ego was about that large. He now goes my another name for his business.
truse story on the name part.
Mark

 
 
That was George E. Ohr, right?  ;)
 
best,
 
...............john

But, Ohr really was a Master Potter, don't you think? With all the criteria we can agree on? An exception, though, like Cellini, who also just knew he was a Master - their bragging rankles, but their skills can't be denied.

 

 

Indeed he was but I don't find him bragging. I think it was more of striking out against "establishment ceramics" than boastfulness. You have to remember, he travelled around to check out whomever he could so he knew he was in fact the best (although that wouldn't be realized for a long time). IMO it was more of a expression of frustration more than anything else. What is a "master potter"? IMO that is a title only other potters can hang on an individual (George excluded). Only other artist can designate who is an artist (which goes completely against George during his time) so there is no cut-and-dried answer. I've always said a "master" is not someone who brings out the best in themselves at "whatever"; they can also bring out the best in others as well.

 

I am "the potter"  I am today directly because of George Ohr (I was formerly a metal guy)......and that happened AFTER I was married to potter and doing production work for her for 13 years.......and the guy has been dead almost 100 years.....



#64 glazenerd

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Posted 14 January 2016 - 01:00 AM

Having read all four pages, let me try to assemble a list of qualifications. Most of which I am assimilating from other trades as applicable:

 

1. 25 years experience ( not including apprenticeship or school). Problem being, clay has so many niches. So would it be 25 years of throwing, hand building, slip, molds, etc. If you spent years studying glazes- does that make you a glaze master? Slab master? sorry... morticians already have that title.

 

2. In order to be a master plumber, electrician, or carpenter: an extensive test is required. Has the pottery industry devised such a standard of testing?

 

Pottery is such a broad and inclusive term because it incorporates all methods of forming, all types and methods of glazing, and all methods of firing. Being rather new here, it is apparent that some have the background, training, experience, and working knowledge to have that title assigned. Art also becomes a contested term: does it mean the stunning beauty of the finished work, or the skill required to make it? I have come to believe that it is not the modern advances in the tools, equipment, and materials used to make pottery that has caused the diminished view towards this art form. As a society, recent generations view art on their 3-5" screens, or through other social mediums such as Pinterest. To experience art, you have to stand in front of it, view it from all its aspects, touch it, and form either an emotional attraction or repulsion to the piece. That will never happen sitting in front of monitor.

 

ART REQUIRES AN APPRECIATION- and appreciation has become a lost art.

 

Nerd






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