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Non Slip Glaze Surface


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#1 pottyjac

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 12:36 PM

Hi there,

I wonder if anyone can help. I have just completed a 6 foot diameter ceramic mural for a local school, which I designed and made to be installed on an incline. This is now glazed and I am about to finish and fire in some decals of the children's drawings. The architect has now 'moved the goal posts' and the mural is to be installed flat and be walked upon. This now presents health and safety implications as it could be slippy when wet.

Has anyone encountered this before and could advise me how I could proceed to solve the problem now presented. One solution I was thinking could be to refire but with a fine covering of silver sand to put some tooth into the existing clear glaze. The mural is made of 110 individually made sections, some are carved/impressed and others are smooth.

Any suggestions would be very appreciated.

#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 09:46 AM

Sorry but I have no solutions other than to encourage you to protect yourself.

In writing, make sure the architect understands the risks then, hopefully, you
will not be liable for any injuries.

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#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 03:25 AM

I agree with Chris. If this was not the original plan for the design's installation, someone has just made a hazardous slippery situation. Make sure you are not liable. In writing.
Marcia

#4 Seasoned Warrior

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 04:14 PM

Hi there,

I wonder if anyone can help. I have just completed a 6 foot diameter ceramic mural for a local school, which I designed and made to be installed on an incline. This is now glazed and I am about to finish and fire in some decals of the children's drawings. The architect has now 'moved the goal posts' and the mural is to be installed flat and be walked upon. This now presents health and safety implications as it could be slippy when wet.

Has anyone encountered this before and could advise me how I could proceed to solve the problem now presented. One solution I was thinking could be to refire but with a fine covering of silver sand to put some tooth into the existing clear glaze. The mural is made of 110 individually made sections, some are carved/impressed and others are smooth.

Any suggestions would be very appreciated.




Hi:

I am sorry that you have encountered this problem but while I have no technical suggestions to offer I do have some considerations you could consider. I have had changes made by the customer in the past but I always have a contract for cutom work. I am not an attorney so I can not give you advice but I can tell you what I have done under similar circumstances. I have a contract that spells out the technical specifications for the project as well as a technical drawing of the location and a drawing showing the art. The contract is agreed to by all parties at a multi-disciplinary meeting with the architect and the contractor and myself. I have needs that the contractor needs to understand for my project. If there are any changes then I require a change order. I would consider going from a sloped installation to a level installation with people walking on my art is a material change. I would develop the specification for the change and then I would charge appropriately for it. A material change may actually require new art or substantial changes to the existing art but the changes should be well documented and the artist should be adequately compensated.

Good luck and best regards,
Charles

#5 pottyjac

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 04:05 PM

Sorry but I have no solutions other than to encourage you to protect yourself.

In writing, make sure the architect understands the risks then, hopefully, you
will not be liable for any injuries.



Thanks you very much for getting back to me. Am in the UK and this is first time used forum. Cheers Jac.

#6 pottyjac

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 04:07 PM

I agree with Chris. If this was not the original plan for the design's installation, someone has just made a hazardous slippery situation. Make sure you are not liable. In writing.
Marcia





Thanks Marcia, I will certainly do that. Cheers Jac

#7 pottyjac

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Posted 01 August 2010 - 04:25 PM


Hi there,

I wonder if anyone can help. I have just completed a 6 foot diameter ceramic mural for a local school, which I designed and made to be installed on an incline. This is now glazed and I am about to finish and fire in some decals of the children's drawings. The architect has now 'moved the goal posts' and the mural is to be installed flat and be walked upon. This now presents health and safety implications as it could be slippy when wet.

Has anyone encountered this before and could advise me how I could proceed to solve the problem now presented. One solution I was thinking could be to refire but with a fine covering of silver sand to put some tooth into the existing clear glaze. The mural is made of 110 individually made sections, some are carved/impressed and others are smooth.

Any suggestions would be very appreciated.


.



Hi:

I am sorry that you have encountered this problem but while I have no technical suggestions to offer I do have some considerations you could consider. I have had changes made by the customer in the past but I always have a contract for cutom work. I am not an attorney so I can not give you advice but I can tell you what I have done under similar circumstances. I have a contract that spells out the technical specifications for the project as well as a technical drawing of the location and a drawing showing the art. The contract is agreed to by all parties at a multi-disciplinary meeting with the architect and the contractor and myself. I have needs that the contractor needs to understand for my project. If there are any changes then I require a change order. I would consider going from a sloped installation to a level installation with people walking on my art is a material change. I would develop the specification for the change and then I would charge appropriately for it. A material change may actually require new art or substantial changes to the existing art but the changes should be well documented and the artist should be adequately compensated.

Good luck and best regards,
Charles


Many thanks for taking the time to reply in so much detail. Thank you for sharing your practice and how you would approach a similar contract. I have a background in insurance and English law (a former life!) and I can't believe I am not taking control appropriately as there has clearly been a material change to the original contract. I have since done some research and there is a substance you can apply to ceramic tiles to make them non-slip but it needs applied yearly.

I will make it a written condition that installation is subject to the School taking over all responsibility for ensuring the surface is regularly treated and absolute liability rests with them.
Kind regards, jac

#8 nicoledc109

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Posted 03 August 2010 - 05:21 AM

Hi there,

I wonder if anyone can help. I have just completed a 6 foot diameter ceramic mural for a local school, which I designed and made to be installed on an incline. This is now glazed and I am about to finish and fire in some decals of the children's drawings. The architect has now 'moved the goal posts' and the mural is to be installed flat and be walked upon. This now presents health and safety implications as it could be slippy when wet.

Has anyone encountered this before and could advise me how I could proceed to solve the problem now presented. One solution I was thinking could be to refire but with a fine covering of silver sand to put some tooth into the existing clear glaze. The mural is made of 110 individually made sections, some are carved/impressed and others are smooth.

Any suggestions would be very appreciated.


Thanks for sharing.


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