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Handle attachment crack...patch before bisquing?


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#1 Ginny C

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:29 PM

If I succeed in uploading a photo, you'll see a crack where the handle attaches to a bone dry mug. The crack doesn't go all the way around, just across the top half. (I know it's because the cup was a bit too dry when I attached the handle, but I'd like to save it if possible! I dried it upside down so the weight wouldn't pull the handle off, but this crack appeared anyway.)
Should I brush in some paper clay slip? I have some that's pretty thick and stiff, so it wouldn't add much moisture.

If I don't, is the crack likely to get worse in the bisque firing??

Laguna B-mix cone 5. Will bisque to 06 and then glaze fire to cone 6.

Ginny C
Attached File  IMG_6643.jpg   994.84KB   103 downloads

#2 Mark C.

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:32 PM

Best fixed before bisquing-Tool in some slip and then after drying rub it out with a sharp tool. Then fire.If its still cracked after firing try some bisque fix by amaco.
Mark
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#3 Chris Campbell

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:45 PM

Just be very aware of that mug if you try to use it for hot beverages as that might always be a weak spot. Cracks never really go away. : - )

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#4 Mark C.

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 09:36 PM

You can use a kiln cement on the crack after bisquing to get the strength back.Hi fire mender is one I like as you mix your clay body with it and then mix it so repairs are a good match.
Mark
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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#5 OffCenter

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 10:27 PM

Toss it or you'll spend more time "fixing" it (and not being sure it's really fixed) than it would take to make a replacement.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#6 JessicaGrayCeramics

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 05:43 AM

Toss it or you'll spend more time "fixing" it (and not being sure it's really fixed) than it would take to make a replacement.


I'm with Jim. At least at this point, you can still reuse the clay.
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#7 emptynester

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 10:00 AM

I can see why you would like to save it. It has nice details. That being said, I would reclaim the clay now. I haven't had great results with repairs. The glaze seems to high light the repaired area.

#8 Iforgot

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 12:57 PM

I'd shove some sodium sillicate into the crack with a hard brush before bisque.



Darrel
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