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Air filter over ceramics classroom


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#1 Natania

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 04:06 PM

I am preparing to request an air filter for my high school ceramics classroom for next year. I'd like something that sucks up dust particularly. The room is tiny though, and I've en ones for $1600 that just seem like they might be overkill and they even state that they are for big spaces. Any ideas?

P.s. I typed this post on my iPad, so the title of it should read : air filter FOR ceramics classroom. Silly thing...

#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 05:07 PM

In 1980 when my ceramics classroom/lab was moved to a separate building on campus, the engineers installed clay dust collectors in the clay mixing area...LOW TO THE FLOOR. The suction ducts were about 18" off the floor. The reasoning was, only the light weight dust would be drawn overhead and tend to circulate the heavier dust. So consider sucking the dust down, not up.



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#3 Lucille Oka

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 01:30 AM

If you contact an HVAC rep they can be helpful on the best way to direct the air out of the space and draw in fresh air. And having a good maintenance crew that can wet mop and not sweep during the clean up can be a help also.
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#4 Iforgot

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 09:10 AM

I hae a really small studio and I got a HEPA filter for the glaze area, it was only like $40 and it can filter up to two microns, wich is about the size of larger clay particles.



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#5 JBaymore

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 10:21 AM

You already have a lot of air filters in the room.... your and youir kids lungs.

Ceiling mounted HEPA air filters are the LAST line of defense on dust issues. You should be addressing studio practices first, local pickup ventilation second, general dilution ventialation third, and then the last thins after all the rest have been addressed is HEAP filter units....... layout and selection by an industrial experienced HVAC engineer.

Got to the OSHA website for information about how YOU need to be treated as an employee that is exposed to aiorborne respirable silica dust.

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#6 Natania

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 09:36 PM

You already have a lot of air filters in the room.... your and youir kids lungs.

Ceiling mounted HEPA air filters are the LAST line of defense on dust issues. You should be addressing studio practices first, local pickup ventilation second, general dilution ventialation third, and then the last thins after all the rest have been addressed is HEAP filter units....... layout and selection by an industrial experienced HVAC engineer.

Got to the OSHA website for information about how YOU need to be treated as an employee that is exposed to aiorborne respirable silica dust.

best,

.............john



This is just one aspect of the overall safety scene. The custodian does wet mop after she uses the vacuum I got with a HEPA filter and wearing a respirator. The students and I keep things as clean as we can with lots of wet sponge clean up, but I thought that in the interest of creating the best environment possible I could ask for (and likely get) an air filter. I should mention that although the room is tiny I only teach one small class in it, so i dont think that the dust/mess is overwhelming. Not sure what other measures to take ....any suggestions?

#7 Stephen Robison

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 07:02 PM

The idea that studio practice is the best defense is so so so true. Keep it clean and use sponges and wet mop and toss out every broom and dust pan! Do no raise it in the air. Wipe it down!!!! A filter is great and the ceiling mounts are great but portable floor mounts may raise the dust less. John Baymore's comments are great. Make sure you teach the students proper clean up procedures.
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