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Making Hand prints In Clay


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#1 memoriesinclay

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 09:59 PM

Hello everyone,

This is my first post here on the forum, but I've been a long time reader here and have gotten tons of useful advice from the people here, so I thought I would reach out for some help.

I've recently started a small business turning hand prints into wonderful keepsakes. I've made ornaments, plates, and many other items and although it's just a side thing at this point, it has been great so far. I want to branch out my business and open an etsy shop. My idea is to mail customers some type of plaster, have them put their child's hand prints in it and mail it back. From that, I will turn the hand prints into whatever the customer wants (ornaments, frames, etc). There are a few sellers on Etsy already that do this, but I'm not exactly sure how they do it (and they don't want to divulge there process, understandably).

My questions:
1. What type of plaster would be best to send out to customers to have them send back? I have done some work using model magic, and the products have turned out well, but they don't offer the detail that I would like. Here is a picture of what one of the online companies sends out..... http://www.handprint...863547_orig.jpg ...... any idea what this might be? It has a purple color to it but I'm not sure what it is.

2. Using the model magic, I've been able to use this idea to create 3d products that stick out of the clay, but how would you create a product that sticks into the clay as if it were a regular hand print? What would be the best way to do this.

Thanks for your time. Any advice regarding these questions, or anything else, would be greatly appreciated.

Jessica

#2 Iforgot

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 10:20 PM

uuuuummmmmm.... well when I make paw prints I get a shallow plastic tupperware and fill it with thick slip or plaster until it's almost overflowing. I loosley cover the plaster with cotton muslin and secure it to the container with rubber bands, I can then press the hand, paw, foot, or what ever into the container, the muslin makes it so the hand foot or paw won't stick to the slip, this way I can leave the slip quite oozy, so if I'm printing a cat's paw I don't have to push so hard to make a good print. This tupperware idea might work for your pourposes because you could put the lid on it to mail it, your coustomer could print their hands, let the plaster dry, then send it back.



I hope it works out!

Darrel
Derek VonDrehle

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#3 Lucille Oka

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 04:11 AM

Is that a positive impression? It doesn't look like a negative impression.
What does it smell like? Play Doh? Silly Putty? Take a look at this I am not sure if it will work but there are others listed, it can be a start http://www.dickblick...ns/#description

Also you can try to contact some of the sculpting suppliers there's the Compleat Sculptor in New York City. They have a web site also.
The spelling is correct. Maybe they can direct you if you need it.
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#4 Arnold Howard

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 09:12 AM

I've recently started a small business turning hand prints into wonderful keepsakes. I've made ornaments, plates, and many other items and although it's just a side thing at this point, it has been great so far. I want to branch out my business and open an etsy shop. My idea is to mail customers some type of plaster, have them put their child's hand prints in it and mail it back. From that, I will turn the hand prints into whatever the customer wants (ornaments, frames, etc). There are a few sellers on Etsy already that do this, but I'm not exactly sure how they do it (and they don't want to divulge there process, understandably).


Jessica, I would go to malls or craft fairs and make impressions with the clay that you will fire. You will get finer detail than you would from a plaster cast, and you will save a lot of time.

I fired my son's hand prints in a small stoneware slab when he was about six. Those hand prints and other clay items that he made are priceless now. (He's 25 years old.)

Sincerely,

Arnold Howard
Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA
ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com

#5 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 09:32 AM


I've recently started a small business turning hand prints into wonderful keepsakes. I've made ornaments, plates, and many other items and although it's just a side thing at this point, it has been great so far. I want to branch out my business and open an etsy shop. My idea is to mail customers some type of plaster, have them put their child's hand prints in it and mail it back. From that, I will turn the hand prints into whatever the customer wants (ornaments, frames, etc). There are a few sellers on Etsy already that do this, but I'm not exactly sure how they do it (and they don't want to divulge there process, understandably).


Jessica, I would go to malls or craft fairs and make impressions with the clay that you will fire. You will get finer detail than you would from a plaster cast, and you will save a lot of time.

I fired my son's hand prints in a small stoneware slab when he was about six. Those hand prints and other clay items that he made are priceless now. (He's 25 years old.)

Sincerely,

Arnold Howard
Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA
ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com



This is a beautiful Idea! I need to do this with my 4 kids... Not sure if the 13 yr old will go along with it. lol
Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#6 Nancy S.

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 12:15 PM

One option -- if you want your handprint to be raised -- is to have the buyer purchase a $1.50 pack of soft Fimo or Sculpey, make the impression, bake the "mold" and then mail it to you. You can then press soft clay into the mold and go from there.

#7 Mark C.

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 02:05 PM

I have been around this type of business before in my craft show career more than once- Seen them come and go.I think getting internet sales as well as going out to various venues is your best bet.Customers referring there friends-maybe thru face book and other social media will help.
Wish you well in this. I think making the prints sharp and clear via mail order will a tough thing.
Mark
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