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Patterns on clay....how do you keep them there?


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#1 cstovin

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:05 PM

This is going to seem funny to most people...I just started adding texture to some of my slab pottery. What I am using for example is a thin piece of leather that was machine embossed. The down side is that the piece of leather doesn't have very deep impressions, but does leave enough texture to leave nice markings on my pottery. The problem is though, for example, when you attempt to do something with the slab, and have to use a sponge, (example when pushing a seam together) how do you keep the texture from being removed from using the sponge?


This seems pretty basic - the only thing I can think of is that my texture isn't deep enough, but it would still get messed up by having to use a sponge to sponge over it. I was making a wall vase yesterday and the bottom side of my clay started to crack a little, I thought it was still pretty wet, but obviously to smooth those out...out went the texture!

Any suggestions would be appreciated - I haven't don't much with textures!

Charlene

#2 macdoodle

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 04:44 PM

from a back issue - http://ceramicartsda...and-soft-slabs/

#3 cstovin

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 09:38 PM

from a back issue - http://ceramicartsda...and-soft-slabs/



Thank you, but I can't afford to buy the videos right now - but they look great!

#4 weeble

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:58 PM

You don't have to buy anything, just scroll down the page and view the clip. Basically, when you're pushing a seam together, try using your fingers instead of a sponge and be careful of the design. Getting your slab the proper dryness for the manipulation you have to do is a matter of practice, and sometimes using a bit of plastic to retard drying in one area and a hair dryer to speed it in another.
Maryjane Carlson

Whistling Fish Pottery

#5 Chris Campbell

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 10:54 AM

Number one thing is you do not have to use a sponge. I have never used one in all the years I have been hand building. If you use your bare hands you will get a better feel for what is happening and learn about touch and pressure. You loose the immediacy of this when you put a soft sponge between you and the clay.
Your texture might be too shallow but there is a lot of work made with light textures ... you just might need to slow down and really pay attention to your whole joining process.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
www.ccpottery.com

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#6 macdoodle

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 03:58 PM

besides watching the free excerpts shown below the for purchase CDs and books
Support your local library.
They have tons of info they bought so you can access it for free.
I have very limited income, so I like to take books out and see if they are something I'd want to refer back to before I buy them.

#7 cstovin

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 01:03 AM

Thank you I went to the library today and got a book; and I am going to try working without the sponge. I can't watch the clip on the referenced page - something is wrong with my download of Adobe; have tried reinstalling it several times and it still won't work - so will have to get that looked at - thanks again

#8 macdoodle

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 06:24 PM


Happy reading -and working it out!

If you use Firefox - https://support.mozi...gin-has-crashed or use http://mzl.la/LIoF7y
Next to the picture and word Firefox adjust for your operating system if needed.


#9 Chantay

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 06:30 PM

I had a time when I couldn't view videos. I had downloaded and repeatedly tried to install the updated Adobe. Still wouldn't work. After I down loaded firefox, It finally worked.

-chantay


- chantay

#10 Lucille Oka

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 04:08 PM

When next you go to the library see if you can get a copy of this book or if not, it maybe available as an interlibrary loan. It is however available at Amazon.com.

Making Pottery Without a Wheel; texture and form in clay [by] F. Carlton Ball and Janice Lovoos, Publisher:Reinhold, New York [1965]

This book concentrates on using textures for hand building clay forms. It is an older book but the information is timeless.
John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#11 Isculpt

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 11:12 AM

The book that Lucille referred to, Making Pottery Without A Wheel; Texture and Form in Clay, is available at AbeBooks.com for prices ranging from $4.35 including shipping to over $100. If you don't mind used books, AbeBooks is a goldmine. They are my go-to bookstore for books on pottery, with prices that usually (though not always) beat their competitors. Thanks to Lucille's suggestion, I just ordered a used copy of Making Pottery Without a Wheel rated "Very Good", which is usually darned near new, for $6.44 including shipping. Thanks, Lucille!
Jayne




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