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Oops, too much water in the glaze.


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#1 Harry Potter

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:14 AM

Well, here I am once again. Made a batch of Raku copper luster from book- alternative kilns and firing tech. Recipe notes from workshop noted batch made a gallon. Sooo I mixed up batch ( approx.1,060 grams) added a gallon of water, screened and it ended up very fluid. Any suggestions for reducing the amount of water or thickening up mix, I've already left top off hoping for evaporation. Aside from making up partial additional recipe to add to this batch, I'm at a loss.

Any suggestions? It's not like I could add flour to thicken it. But is there anything I could add to thicken without affecting the product. or just bite the bullet and make up partial recipe.

Recipe:
750.00 Gerstley borate

250.00 Bone

1000.00 Total

add

40.0 Copper carbonate

20.0 Cobalt Oxide

#2 Pres

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:24 AM

Well, here I am once again. Made a batch of Raku copper luster from book- alternative kilns and firing tech. Recipe notes from workshop noted batch made a gallon. Sooo I mixed up batch ( approx.1,060 grams) added a gallon of water, screened and it ended up very fluid. Any suggestions for reducing the amount of water or thickening up mix, I've already left top off hoping for evaporation. Aside from making up partial additional recipe to add to this batch, I'm at a loss.

Any suggestions? It's not like I could add flour to thicken it. But is there anything I could add to thicken without affecting the product. or just bite the bullet and make up partial recipe.

Recipe:
750.00 Gerstley borate

250.00 Bone

1000.00 Total

add

40.0 Copper carbonate

20.0 Cobalt Oxide


Looks like too much clay to have much settling in the mix, otherwise I would pour off some water. Nope, can't think of anything else than maybe making up a 1/4 batch and adding to the present batch.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#3 Mark C.

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:44 AM

Leave it alone for a day or three and with a small cup dip in so the water flows over the lip- just take the top water off and try to not disturb the reast-finish with a large sponge to get all the water.
All those materials will settle out in a few days. Evaporation takes too much time unless you live in Tucsan AZ and its summer time.
Mark
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#4 yedrow

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 01:12 AM

I've laid a box fan across the top, spaced with a couple of 2x4s.

Joel.

#5 Iforgot

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 01:15 AM

I'd add two tablespoons of magnesium sulfate solution. if that turns out to be too much add like 4 tablespoons of majic water. or if it is just all settled in the bottom, which could be the problem you could add some cmc gum solution or bentonite.
Derek VonDrehle

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#6 Harry Potter

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 08:33 AM

I love this site, the members are so quick to respond. Good advice all the way around. I did try dipping in the mix and it seems to work, even if brushing seemed weak. May dip a couple of times to be sure thickness is sufficient. Thanks folks.

#7 TJR

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 09:52 AM

Harry;
Mark is right. The simplest thing to do is let the batch sit for at least a day if not three, then decant the surface water without mixing up the rest. I would avoid adding anything else. I have on occaision added 3% bentonite. You have to mix it up with water in a small cup with a small amount of water. Then you have to re-sieve your entire glaze. A pain!
TJR

#8 OffCenter

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 10:05 AM

Well, here I am once again. Made a batch of Raku copper luster from book- alternative kilns and firing tech. Recipe notes from workshop noted batch made a gallon. Sooo I mixed up batch ( approx.1,060 grams) added a gallon of water, screened and it ended up very fluid. Any suggestions for reducing the amount of water or thickening up mix, I've already left top off hoping for evaporation. Aside from making up partial additional recipe to add to this batch, I'm at a loss.

Any suggestions? It's not like I could add flour to thicken it. But is there anything I could add to thicken without affecting the product. or just bite the bullet and make up partial recipe.

Recipe:
750.00 Gerstley borate

250.00 Bone

1000.00 Total

add

40.0 Copper carbonate

20.0 Cobalt Oxide


It's such a simple recipe, why don't you just divide each ingredient by 2 or 3 and add that to what you've already mixed up. Zap! problem solved without all that nonsense about waiting for water to evaporate.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#9 JBaymore

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 11:20 AM

It's such a simple recipe, why don't you just divide each ingredient by 2 or 3 and add that to what you've already mixed up. Zap! problem solved without all that nonsense about waiting for water to evaporate.


From my point of view this is THE answer. (Unless you are out of raw materials.)

best,

.............john
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#10 Chris Campbell

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:17 PM

Another tip from a lazy potter ... I drape old cotton cloths around the bucket just letting the bottoms touch the surface. Through osmosis your cloths will be wet the next morning speeding up the evaporation process without much effort. I do this with my colored slips since they are easier to blend thin but I like to use them when they are thick.

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#11 yedrow

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 02:09 PM

Another tip from a lazy potter ... I drape old cotton cloths around the bucket just letting the bottoms touch the surface. Through osmosis your cloths will be wet the next morning speeding up the evaporation process without much effort. I do this with my colored slips since they are easier to blend thin but I like to use them when they are thick.


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