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SShirley

Technology comes to face jugs

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bciskepottery    925

In the wrong hands, it could be saddening. But, at the same time . . . the technology could be used to make a replica of some of the fragile pottery in museums so students and professionals could hold, examine, and touch the copies . . . without the risk of damaging the original. There is good and bad potential to all technology. Where technology goes will depend on us.

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Mark C.    1,800

Darn just when I thought my salt face jug was one of a kind-now it can be knocked off and sold in a Target store for 2.99$.

Mark

post-8914-135745663783_thumb.jpg

post-8914-135745663783_thumb.jpg

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

In the wrong hands, it could be saddening. But, at the same time . . . the technology could be used to make a replica of some of the fragile pottery in museums so students and professionals could hold, examine, and touch the copies . . . without the risk of damaging the original. There is good and bad potential to all technology. Where technology goes will depend on us.

 

To touch a replica not made by touch seems like an oxymoron.Clay is such a tactile media, the fingerprints seem essential.

 

Marcia

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bciskepottery    925

In the wrong hands, it could be saddening. But, at the same time . . . the technology could be used to make a replica of some of the fragile pottery in museums so students and professionals could hold, examine, and touch the copies . . . without the risk of damaging the original. There is good and bad potential to all technology. Where technology goes will depend on us.

 

To touch a replica not made by touch seems like an oxymoron.Clay is such a tactile media, the fingerprints seem essential.

 

Marcia

 

 

 

Yeah . . . I think you're right. Can't replicate the touch of the person who made the original.

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Claypple    29

This technology is not really that new. It is called "3D printing", and you could buy that printer over the internet even 3 -5 years ago.

It is really fascinating what it can do for everybody. Even for the potters.

Do not look at it as a competitor. Molding technique exists for how long? (Do the coffee mugs for $2.99 at Walmart hurt your business? No.)

Look at it as another opportunity to integrate into your work without hurting it.

 

It is useless to be afraid or fight with the evolution of the human society.

Good example: news paper business and internet.

An artist will never be replaced by a technology. So, adopt, improve, evolve!

 

P.S. Just bought an app on i-phone for translation of spoken speach. Paid $0.99.

Does it mean the interpreters' job will be gone soon? Of course not. :-)

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JBaymore    1,432

At my main "home base" for when I am working in Japan... at one of the largest (if not currently THE largest) yakishime wood firing operations in Japan...... sitting about 50 feet from one of the multiple large wood kilns there is the "IT department" building.

 

In this building is a computer system running Rinocerous 3-D modeling CAD/CAM software, a CNC machine for making mold making master models, and also the 3-D scanning equipment to make 3-D models directly from scanned objects. This capability was already there way back in 2002.

 

The potters there utilize every possible forming technique you can think of from slip casting, to pressure slip casting, to hydraulic pressing, to jiggering and jollying, to press molding, to pinching, to slab building, to throwing.

 

All is finish fired unglazed in noborigama (youhen charcoal technique) or anagama kilns.

 

The dichotomy that is Japan.

 

best,

 

..............john

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OffCenter    82

It doesn't matter how you get there. It's the piece that matters. I couldn't care less if some folk potter dug the clay, ground the glazes from local rocks and woodfired the mug in his groundhog kiln or if the mug came from a Chinese CAM machine to a shelf at Target. The only thing that matters is the mug. As crappy as they are, some $2.99 mugs at a chain store look better than some of the handmade mugs at street sales.

 

Jim

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bciskepottery    925

Yes, the technology has been around . . . but until recently, only for those with deep deep pockets. The technology is becoming cheaper, making it more affordable for more people. It's not just face jugs; I saw one article in news recently about a couple of folks wanting to use 3-D printers to make firearms and the attendant concerns that has raised with those who deal with regulating the manufacture, sale, etc. of firearms. The folks were using kickstarter or something like that to raise the funds to buy the 3-D printer. Technology will change and evolve must faster than the general world adapts to the impact of technology. Like I said, there is good and bad to technology . . . it depends on us.

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SShirley    9

What impressed me was that they chose to reproduce a face jug at all. To me that says that they recognize historical ceramic work as having importance and value. Sincerest form of flattery and all that.

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OffCenter    82

This technology is not really that new. It is called "3D printing", and you could buy that printer over the internet even 3 -5 years ago.

It is really fascinating what it can do for everybody. Even for the potters.

Do not look at it as a competitor. Molding technique exists for how long? (Do the coffee mugs for $2.99 at Walmart hurt your business? No.)

Look at it as another opportunity to integrate into your work without hurting it.

 

It is useless to be afraid or fight with the evolution of the human society.

Good example: news paper business and internet.

An artist will never be replaced by a technology. So, adopt, improve, evolve!

 

P.S. Just bought an app on i-phone for translation of spoken speach. Paid $0.99.

Does it mean the interpreters' job will be gone soon? Of course not. :-)

 

 

Good stuff. Post more, Claypple.

 

Jim

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bciskepottery    925

This technology is not really that new. It is called "3D printing", and you could buy that printer over the internet even 3 -5 years ago.

It is really fascinating what it can do for everybody. Even for the potters.

Do not look at it as a competitor. Molding technique exists for how long? (Do the coffee mugs for $2.99 at Walmart hurt your business? No.)

Look at it as another opportunity to integrate into your work without hurting it.

 

It is useless to be afraid or fight with the evolution of the human society.

Good example: news paper business and internet.

An artist will never be replaced by a technology. So, adopt, improve, evolve!

 

P.S. Just bought an app on i-phone for translation of spoken speach. Paid $0.99.

Does it mean the interpreters' job will be gone soon? Of course not. :-)

 

 

Good stuff. Post more, Claypple.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

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Pres    896

This technology is not really that new. It is called "3D printing", and you could buy that printer over the internet even 3 -5 years ago.

It is really fascinating what it can do for everybody. Even for the potters.

Do not look at it as a competitor. Molding technique exists for how long? (Do the coffee mugs for $2.99 at Walmart hurt your business? No.)

Look at it as another opportunity to integrate into your work without hurting it.

 

It is useless to be afraid or fight with the evolution of the human society.

Good example: news paper business and internet.

An artist will never be replaced by a technology. So, adopt, improve, evolve!

 

P.S. Just bought an app on i-phone for translation of spoken speach. Paid $0.99.

Does it mean the interpreters' job will be gone soon? Of course not. :-)

 

 

Good stuff. Post more, Claypple.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is quite a bit of fear out there concerning 3D printing. As in a recent program from CSI New York law enforcement is concerned about the possibility of 3D printed guns. These would have no serial numbers, no markings, and not have to have licenses to own. If you look at the latest in headlines-could be pretty scary.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

This technology is not really that new. It is called "3D printing", and you could buy that printer over the internet even 3 -5 years ago.

It is really fascinating what it can do for everybody. Even for the potters.

Do not look at it as a competitor. Molding technique exists for how long? (Do the coffee mugs for $2.99 at Walmart hurt your business? No.)

Look at it as another opportunity to integrate into your work without hurting it.

 

It is useless to be afraid or fight with the evolution of the human society.

Good example: news paper business and internet.

An artist will never be replaced by a technology. So, adopt, improve, evolve!

 

P.S. Just bought an app on i-phone for translation of spoken speach. Paid $0.99.

Does it mean the interpreters' job will be gone soon? Of course not. :-)

 

 

I know artists creating with 3-d printing. I saw a great demo at the Bray 60th or at an NCECA by John Ballistero. Anna Holcombe is doing very interesting clay creations with 3-d printing. It isn't the technology I find sad, it is the reproduction of a genre of pottery, Face jugs, that depicted the expression of the human spirit created by slaves originally ... and the reproductions callously created without human touch. The technology is awesome and has great potential, but like everything else wisdom, sensitivity don't necessarily follow.

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OffCenter    82

This technology is not really that new. It is called "3D printing", and you could buy that printer over the internet even 3 -5 years ago.

It is really fascinating what it can do for everybody. Even for the potters.

Do not look at it as a competitor. Molding technique exists for how long? (Do the coffee mugs for $2.99 at Walmart hurt your business? No.)

Look at it as another opportunity to integrate into your work without hurting it.

 

It is useless to be afraid or fight with the evolution of the human society.

Good example: news paper business and internet.

An artist will never be replaced by a technology. So, adopt, improve, evolve!

 

P.S. Just bought an app on i-phone for translation of spoken speach. Paid $0.99.

Does it mean the interpreters' job will be gone soon? Of course not. :-)

 

 

I know artists creating with 3-d printing. I saw a great demo at the Bray 60th or at an NCECA by John Ballistero. Anna Holcombe is doing very interesting clay creations with 3-d printing. It isn't the technology I find sad, it is the reproduction of a genre of pottery, Face jugs, that depicted the expression of the human spirit created by slaves originally ... and the reproductions callously created without human touch. The technology is awesome and has great potential, but like everything else wisdom, sensitivity don't necessarily follow.

 

 

We like to think we can see that wisdom and sensitivity in a piece. I don't know how far the technology has progressed in the past few years, but unless you can see that wisdom and sensitivity in one piece and not the other, then that difference doesn't exist.

 

Jim

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Jim,

I suppose that is very true. I always viewed the Face Jugs as a tragic reminder of "Man's Inhumanity to Man". I( guess that can be conveyed by a replica made by machine.

Marcia

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Claypple    29

What if we look at it from the different perspective. Let's take pie making, e.g.

You can go to a grocery store and buy a pretty good quality pie. (equivalent of going to Walmart and buying a mug)

You can bake your own pie (sometimes good, sometimes not). (equivalent of making your own mug)

Or, if you happen to be a chef, you make it from a scratch and it looks like a very special pie. (equivalent of a professional artist making a vase)

 

So, if you like baking your own pies and making your own mugs, then do it! (I like.) (Not the pies.)

If you are a professional potter, then you should study and monitor the progress at 3-D printing.

 

If you are the artist, however, then nothing, even the best 3-D printer can put you down, because you create The Art!

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OffCenter    82

What if we look at it from the different perspective. Let's take pie making, e.g.

You can go to a grocery store and buy a pretty good quality pie. (equivalent of going to Walmart and buying a mug)

You can bake your own pie (sometimes good, sometimes not). (equivalent of making your own mug)

Or, if you happen to be a chef, you make it from a scratch and it looks like a very special pie. (equivalent of a professional artist making a vase)

 

So, if you like baking your own pies and making your own mugs, then do it! (I like.) (Not the pies.)

If you are a professional potter, then you should study and monitor the progress at 3-D printing.

 

If you are the artist, however, then nothing, even the best 3-D printer can put you down, because you create The Art!

 

 

Not only can it not put you down but it could be the best potters tool ever.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I know it has great creative potential. Creative people using new technology is an exciting combination.

It was the replicating of a very expressive historical genre that I wondered about...(not condemned). creative people play with new technology, push the limits and beyond. That is a good thing.

 

Marcia

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I cut my own plaster masters on a wheel. Sometimes it could take days to complete a complex master, as it would sometimes involve making a first mold so that another (more perfect) master could be created. With this 3-D technology it would still be 'my' design, but made much quicker. This translates into money saved, etc.

 

Regarding the face mug that was 3-D'ed. I could never understand the fascination of the USA potters with face mugs. Thanks to the article, I understand the historical interest/love for it. But it is still a weird thing for me :-)

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