Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
GA_Clayman67

Nailing Down a Glaze!

Recommended Posts

A customer brought this mug to me yesterday, wondering whether I could make a companion piece.

 

The duplication's not the challenge, but the glaze is. I've always wanted a whitish glaze and this is the one!

I'm throwing Laguna Bmix5 and firing in oxidation.

 

I'd be happy with either a commercial glaze or a recipe if I can get anywhere near this effect.

 

Thanks for whatever suggestions anyone might have.

 

Art

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TJR    359

Art;

This is a huge headache. I have had customers bring me Limoge porcelain pieces from France to copy. I have received Belleeck pottery from Ireland. I have been asked to paint an image of a cello on plates, then the customer complained that there were brush strokes! It was hand painted. I have had customers ask me to match the green from their wedding dinner ware set. This is what you do.

1. Go over to a mirror- could be bathroom, hallway, what ever.

2. Say this after me; "no."

3.Or you could say; "No thank-you."

4. Then move on to the work you like to make with a clear conscience.

5.The first time you say no is difficult, as you don't want to offend, but it gets easier.

6.Other wise, you will spend a lot of time on this, and your customer will still not be satisfied.

 

TJR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neilestrick    1,381

Ditto. Say no. You'll spend hours testing that you won't get paid for. It's a total waste of time from a business standpoint. Plus if someone respects your abilities as an artist, then they should buy your work, not ask you to copy someone else's. Learning to say no to customers is one of the greatest skills you can have as an artist. It's liberating!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OffCenter    82

A customer brought this mug to me yesterday, wondering whether I could make a companion piece.

 

The duplication's not the challenge, but the glaze is. I've always wanted a whitish glaze and this is the one!

I'm throwing Laguna Bmix5 and firing in oxidation.

 

I'd be happy with either a commercial glaze or a recipe if I can get anywhere near this effect.

 

Thanks for whatever suggestions anyone might have.

 

Art

 

 

I agree with the suggestions you've already received but would like to see the picture of the mug. I often fire Bmix5 in oxidation and have several whites.

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TJR    359

A customer brought this mug to me yesterday, wondering whether I could make a companion piece.

 

The duplication's not the challenge, but the glaze is. I've always wanted a whitish glaze and this is the one!

I'm throwing Laguna Bmix5 and firing in oxidation.

 

I'd be happy with either a commercial glaze or a recipe if I can get anywhere near this effect.

 

Thanks for whatever suggestions anyone might have.

 

Art

 

 

I agree with the suggestions you've already received but would like to see the picture of the mug. I often fire Bmix5 in oxidation and have several whites.

 

Jim

 

 

Jim; You are not helping Art. He needs to stick to his guns and make his own work, not copy others. Good of you to try to help though. I have wasted a lot of time doing these dead end things. I am just trying to save him some anguish.[isn't that a great word?]

TJR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bciskepottery    925

A customer brought this mug to me yesterday, wondering whether I could make a companion piece.

 

The duplication's not the challenge, but the glaze is. I've always wanted a whitish glaze and this is the one!

I'm throwing Laguna Bmix5 and firing in oxidation.

 

I'd be happy with either a commercial glaze or a recipe if I can get anywhere near this effect.

 

Thanks for whatever suggestions anyone might have.

 

Art

 

 

I agree with the suggestions you've already received but would like to see the picture of the mug. I often fire Bmix5 in oxidation and have several whites.

 

Jim

 

 

Jim; You are not helping Art. He needs to stick to his guns and make his own work, not copy others. Good of you to try to help though. I have wasted a lot of time doing these dead end things. I am just trying to save him some anguish.[isn't that a great word?]

TJR.

 

 

 

I was hoping for a picture, too; mostly curious as to the glaze. Even if he does not make the mug, Art seems to be looking for a similar glaze for his own work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OffCenter    82

A customer brought this mug to me yesterday, wondering whether I could make a companion piece.

 

The duplication's not the challenge, but the glaze is. I've always wanted a whitish glaze and this is the one!

I'm throwing Laguna Bmix5 and firing in oxidation.

 

I'd be happy with either a commercial glaze or a recipe if I can get anywhere near this effect.

 

Thanks for whatever suggestions anyone might have.

 

Art

 

 

I agree with the suggestions you've already received but would like to see the picture of the mug. I often fire Bmix5 in oxidation and have several whites.

 

Jim

 

 

Jim; You are not helping Art. He needs to stick to his guns and make his own work, not copy others. Good of you to try to help though. I have wasted a lot of time doing these dead end things. I am just trying to save him some anguish.[isn't that a great word?]

TJR.

 

 

I don't think that is for you to decide, TJR. As I stated, I agree with you and Neil, but he may not and even if he does he is still interested in that glaze. You're sorta coming off as some kind of warden wantabe here. Anguish is an okay word but, if proper nouns are allowed, I like Palermo better. Really rolls off the tongue. BTW, I'm really disappointed that no one thought my post in the "I Just Bought A Whistle" thread was interesting.

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For some reason, I'm having difficulty loading a picture. Thought I had - but apparently not.

 

First - thanks for the input and I agree saying "no" is the best path to take for all the reasons given.

Having said that, the customer doesn't expect an exact duplicate and DID order (and paid for) 4 custom thrown dinner plates.

 

Jim's right, though, I'm more interested in the white glaze - will keep trying to upload.

 

Thanks, all!

 

Art

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JBaymore    1,432

I'd like to see the white glaze that has so intrigued you also, just for the knowledge of what we are talking about here.

 

Along the lines of "just say no"... there is another approch. It is actually typically the "soft no".

 

That is to tell the customer that you would be glad to attempt to duplicate this glaze for them, that there are no promises that you'll ever fully succeed, that the costs for all the the materials, firing costs, and research time will be billed to you (the client), and that the labor rate for such technical research is $100 per hour. Also that a legal contract so stating the terms will be drawn up and signed before any work is started on the project, and that you'll require the first $1000 in advance, with any unused portion thereof gladly refunded if the actual documentable development costs do not reach that amount.

 

If they still "bite" on this deal... then you can actually make some money on the project. ;)src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/wink.gif">

 

 

Otherwise..... the Nancy Reagan method is appropriate: "Just say NO!".

 

 

best,

 

.......................john

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neilestrick    1,381

I tend to use the soft no as well. Most people who haven't worked in ceramics have no idea what goes into making a glaze. They think of it like paint, where you just tint it to the color you want. I explain that it will take at least a half dozen tests, and my labor rate is $75 per hour (that's what I get for kiln repair), so they'll end up with a $500 mug in the end. Educating your customers is always good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to use the soft no as well. Most people who haven't worked in ceramics have no idea what goes into making a glaze. They think of it like paint, where you just tint it to the color you want. I explain that it will take at least a half dozen tests, and my labor rate is $75 per hour (that's what I get for kiln repair), so they'll end up with a $500 mug in the end. Educating your customers is always good.

 

 

Thanks... completely agree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yedrow    8

Ditto. Say no. You'll spend hours testing that you won't get paid for. It's a total waste of time from a business standpoint. Plus if someone respects your abilities as an artist, then they should buy your work, not ask you to copy someone else's. Learning to say no to customers is one of the greatest skills you can have as an artist. It's liberating!

 

 

Rock on!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×