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Ginny C

good glaze to show chatter marks?

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Ginny C    5

I've finally learned how to make chatter marks on pots on the wheel (whee! it's fun to do!), but now I need to learn what kind of glaze works best to allow them to show! I do not make my own glazes but have purchased a variety of pints and gallons from several manufacturers. Some work really well in combination, making interesting colors and patterns, but these obscure the chatter marks, and the color pattern competes with the chatter pattern. Most of the glazes I have are opaque and either gloss or satin but when not combined with a second glaze they can be boring (!) and may also obscure the marks. Will semi-transparent glazes work out better? The only one I have is Peacock Green by Coyote, a lovely glaze but I think most of my friends like more subtle glazes better. The bit of celadon I have is more transparent than I'd like; can I mix it with another glaze?

 

I'm using Laguna B-Mix stoneware clay for cone 5-6 and firing to cone 6.

 

Can anyone recommend other semi-transparent glazes that might work well? And are there any satin semi-transparent glazes?

 

Thanks for suggestions! Don't suggest making my own, please! I'm not going to start doing that now! I'm too old, don't have space for all the ingredients, don't have many years left to do this, as I'm in a race with the arthritis in my fingers. Doing it just for fun and gifts, anyway! And I can afford to buy the glazes, lucky me!

 

I love this community of sharing potters. Merry Christmas, all of you!

Ginny Clark

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neilestrick    1,381

Any transparent or semi-transparent glaze will work. Opaque or semi-opaque glaze can also show deep texture if it's a breaking glaze, meaning it runs off high points and puddles in low points, being different colors/shades where it's thin and thick.

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Brian Reed    23

I have tried many glaze treatments and by far my favorite is to use an iron saturate glaze on the chatter and then wipe off with a wet sponge. I then cover with wax and glaze the rest of the piece. I have used celadon and that works good also. Anything opaque will just leave a slightly bumpy surface.

 

 

You can see some examples of this as well as just on iron wash, like the tea pot on my website

 

http:\\reedpottery.com

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Ginny C    5

Terra sig would be another option, and you can make that in a blender.

 

 

Do you mean terra sig with a color in it, such as iron oxide? I can imagine doing that on a piece that's just to look at, but how about on a vase or a mug?

 

Also, I've made terra sig, but at what point in its making would I use a blender? Ahhh -- probably to thoroughly mix the iron oxide in it before letting it settle. OR after it's made into terra sig, would you blend in color then?

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Ginny C    5

I have tried many glaze treatments and by far my favorite is to use an iron saturate glaze on the chatter and then wipe off with a wet sponge. I then cover with wax and glaze the rest of the piece. I have used celadon and that works good also. Anything opaque will just leave a slightly bumpy surface.

 

 

OH! That reminds me of seeing the amazing videos by Hsien (??) in which he uses underglazes on the chattered parts. What do you mean by iron saturate glaze? (Obviously ones saturated with iron, but how do I know with commercial glazes? Any examples?)

 

Do you cover the whole chattered sections with wax or can you manage to put the wax carefully over just the places where you left the glaze??

 

 

Boy this forum is wonderful! I'm off now to a solstice party. Taking Moroccan Carrots in a chattered bowl glazed in Kiwi, and the chatters don't show!

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Terra sig would be another option, and you can make that in a blender.

 

 

Do you mean terra sig with a color in it, such as iron oxide? I can imagine doing that on a piece that's just to look at, but how about on a vase or a mug?

 

Also, I've made terra sig, but at what point in its making would I use a blender? Ahhh -- probably to thoroughly mix the iron oxide in it before letting it settle. OR after it's made into terra sig, would you blend in color then?

 

 

For functional pieces such as mugs and vases, you would still need to glaze the inside, but you could use terra sig on the outside. That would really show off your texture.

 

To make terra sig in a blender, put distilled water in the blender, gradually add the clay without running the blender, and let it sit for about 30 minutes. Run the blender for to mix the solution, and then, while the blender is running, add a teaspoon of sodium silicate. Immediately pour into a 2-quart jar. Wait a day, and pour off the liquid into another jar. You can run this through a 200-mesh sieve, but it is not really necessary. If you want to add colorants, pour a cup or so of TS into a small jar and add your colorants to that. You pretty much have to constantly stir TS with colorants to keep the colorants mixed in. Mixing them in with the blender would not help. Newman's Red clay makes gorgeous TS.

 

The best thing I have found for buffing TS is this Quickie Microfiber Sponge .

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Iforgot    2

Okay, so you could apply red (or any color) terra siglatta to your pot and then sponge off the terra sig on the high points of the chatter marks. Glaze with a clear glaze or a frank's celadon glaze by coyote, the colored terra sig burns through "key lime" really well.

 

 

 

Good luck,

Darrel

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