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an experiment not to repeat


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#1 docweathers

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 09:19 PM

If you've ever been tempted to try your wife's Cuisinart noodle maker as a small-scale power extruder, don't do it. I gave it a try today and the most important outcome was cleaning up a huge mess. The dies are much too small, require very soft clay, and are almost impossible to clean out. I will stick with my Northstar from now on:unsure:src="http://ceramicartsda...lt/unsure.gif">

Larry

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#2 Mark C.

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 09:30 PM

I always think of Cuisinart right up with Brent Shimpo Northstar Bailey Soldner.
Now on a more realist note the best power kitchen item I can suggest is your blender (thrift/yard sale best)
this makes short work of small test glazes and non easy screenable materials like zinc or bentonite.
This is where a Cuisinart blender will shine-just make sure it never goes back into the kitchen again after use.
Mark
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#3 OffCenter

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:07 AM

I always think of Cuisinart right up with Brent Shimpo Northstar Bailey Soldner.
Now on a more realist note the best power kitchen item I can suggest is your blender (thrift/yard sale best)
this makes short work of small test glazes and non easy screenable materials like zinc or bentonite.
This is where a Cuisinart blender will shine-just make sure it never goes back into the kitchen again after use.
Mark


I bought a cheap blender to use making paperclay and burned it out quickly. Now, I sneak into the kitchen to get the Cuisinart. I've used it for over a year and still have not burned it out. I clean it up after each use and put it back in the kitchen without my wife knowing.

Jim
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#4 TJR

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:14 AM


I always think of Cuisinart right up with Brent Shimpo Northstar Bailey Soldner.
Now on a more realist note the best power kitchen item I can suggest is your blender (thrift/yard sale best)
this makes short work of small test glazes and non easy screenable materials like zinc or bentonite.
This is where a Cuisinart blender will shine-just make sure it never goes back into the kitchen again after use.
Mark


I bought a cheap blender to use making paperclay and burned it out quickly. Now, I sneak into the kitchen to get the Cuisinart. I've used it for over a year and still have not burned it out. I clean it up after each use and put it back in the kitchen without my wife knowing.

Jim

Jim;
A blender is not good for making paper, or paper clay. I burned out about 5 of them in one year. Then it hit me! I am a potter! I have the technology! Now I use a 5 gallon pail, slake my materials overnight, then use my big plaster mixer on my variable speed drill. Works fabulously. Is that a word?
TJR.

#5 TJR

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:19 AM

If you've ever been tempted to try your wife's Cuisinart noodle maker as a small-scale power extruder, don't do it. I gave it a try today and the most important outcome was cleaning up a huge mess. The dies are much too small, require very soft clay, and are almost impossible to clean out. I will stick with my Northstar from now on:unsure:src="http://ceramicartsda...lt/unsure.gif">


DOCWEATHERS;
MY DAD USED TO COME INTO THE KITCHEN AND GRAB A WOODEN SPOON IF HE NEEDED A PIECE OF DOWEL. I ALWAYS WONDERED WHY, AS I GREW UP, all the spoons had short handles. If you like being married to your current wife, I would stay out of the kitchen, and haunt garage sales.My parents remained married, but this always came up in conversation.I buy my own wooden spoons.
TJR.

#6 perkolator

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:28 PM

A blender is not good for making paper, or paper clay. I burned out about 5 of them in one year.


a Vita Mix blender will handle chopping up paper all day long. had a Grad student last year who was grinding up her old mail into pulp to make paper and paper mache for her sculptures for like 3 months. she literally blended hundreds of pounds of paper through this thing. it was an OLD Vita Mix from a garage sale - when she finally though she killed it she gave me the vita mix to diagnose and see if it could be repaired while she was out buying a cheap replacement blender....found out it just blew the fuse inside the housing....good to go for the rest of her project Posted Image i've literally watched these blenders chop up a broomstick, 2x2 wood blocks, cell phone, and many other things during a demo and online videos.




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