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Anasazi clay from NM Clay

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Has anyone any photos of work made with the ANASAZI CONE 10 clay from New Mexico clay (especially in gas kiln with reduction). (It's hard to find any online, because the photos tend to be ancient pots from the Anasazi people.) I bought some recently while in Albuquerque, and am eager to try it out.

Thanks!

 

 

 

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No but I hope someone replies it sounds interesting. I have bought and used Micaceous clay from the same people, they were very nice to deal with, perhaps if you telephoned and chatted with someone they would be able to help. If they do let us all know I'd love to see some pots, Joan (Venicemud)

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Has anyone any photos of work made with the ANASAZI CONE 10 clay from New Mexico clay (especially in gas kiln with reduction). (It's hard to find any online, because the photos tend to be ancient pots from the Anasazi people.) I bought some recently while in Albuquerque, and am eager to try it out.

Thanks!

 

Venicemud is right; those folks at New Mexico Clay are really nice. I've ordered mica from them to add to my clay. I'm heading to Santa Fe from South Carolina for Christmas and I'll try to stop in when I'm in Albuquerque to see if they have any examples of the fired Anasazi clay. If they have any work on site made from the Anasazi clay, I'll take pictures and post them.

 

Jayne

 

 

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I haven't heard of this Anasazi clay but I was part of a Anasazi Research project in college. We used a cone 5 white stoneware and I questioned the teacher about it being too high of a cone for pit firing he said the composition was as close to the original clay as he could get. The work that came out of the pit firing was so fragile that you could sneeze and it would break. I took my work home and refired it cone 04, I lost a little of the smoke on it but it was worth it. I'm not sure why they would call a C10 clay Anasazi?

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I haven't heard of this Anasazi clay but I was part of a Anasazi Research project in college. We used a cone 5 white stoneware and I questioned the teacher about it being too high of a cone for pit firing he said the composition was as close to the original clay as he could get. The work that came out of the pit firing was so fragile that you could sneeze and it would break. I took my work home and refired it cone 04, I lost a little of the smoke on it but it was worth it. I'm not sure why they would call a C10 clay Anasazi?

 

 

I've been wondering how high of a cone pit firing achieves. Do you happen to remember the pit firing cone range from your research project?

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Check out these links . . .

 

http://www.felipeortega.com/ Under pottery classes is a tab for pottery resources; read his article on Jicarilla Pottery for firing temperatures, etc.

 

http://micaceouscookware.com/ I was fortunate to buy one of Brian's bean pots at last year's Smithsonian Craft Show. Like Felipe, Brian digs and processes his own clay in New Mexico. Wonderful craftsmanship.

 

 

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Hello,

You might look at work by Taos potter Pam Lujan-Hauer. She works with local micaceous clays and she does an amazing technique in which she inlays silver in the raw clay. She either pitfires her pieces or fires in an electric kiln, but I don't know if it's all the way to cone 10 in the electric. Probably not. Here's a link to her info on the NAC page: http://nac.nevadaculture.org/?option=com_content&task=view&id=1380&Itemid=367

 

I saw her demo at the Silver City Clay Fest - New Mexico - in August. Beautiful pots.

 

 

quote name='mss' date='09 December 2012 - 01:29 PM' timestamp='1355077793' post='26214']

Has anyone any photos of work made with the ANASAZI CONE 10 clay from New Mexico clay (especially in gas kiln with reduction). (It's hard to find any online, because the photos tend to be ancient pots from the Anasazi people.) I bought some recently while in Albuquerque, and am eager to try it out.

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Has anyone any photos of work made with the ANASAZI CONE 10 clay from New Mexico clay (especially in gas kiln with reduction). (It's hard to find any online, because the photos tend to be ancient pots from the Anasazi people.) I bought some recently while in Albuquerque, and am eager to try it out.

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

The Anasazi clay has nothing to do with ancient peoples, sorry. It is a simile to Amador clay from Laguna, a high iron stoneware made from northern California fireclays from Amador county CA. The clay looks very redish brown in reduction and yellow in oxidation. Curiously it can be fired in any kiln even an Anagama, except Geil brand kiln where it carbon cores every time. Don’t over reduce a high iron clay it is not necessary. I will post a photo after xmas.

 

Brant

 

 

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