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Leopard Spot Shino Glaze-need a recipe for


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#1 SAS Pottery

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 12:07 AM

Our community studio has been using the San Francisco Shino glaze for some time with good results. I'd like to introduce a new Shino into the studio mix and was interested in the Leopard Spot Carbon Trap Shino as another possibility for our general use. My online search has come up with nothing specific. The closest II have found is the Malcolm Davis Shino. Does anyone who has the Leopard Spot recipe mind sharing it at this point? Thanks - Scott

#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:08 PM

The only reference I was able to find was a discussion of leopard spot shino on Clayart; one person said they achieved a similar look by putting Mamo over shino. I think Tom Coleman is doing a workshop with Geil that will show his leopard spot shino work.

#3 SAS Pottery

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 11:35 PM

The only reference I was able to find was a discussion of leopard spot shino on Clayart; one person said they achieved a similar look by putting Mamo over shino. I think Tom Coleman is doing a workshop with Geil that will show his leopard spot shino work.



#4 SAS Pottery

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 11:40 PM

Yes I saw that reference in my online search - also am aware of the Tom Coleman workshop - thought someone in the "community" might already have the recipe and would be willing to share it unless there is a proprietary factor. It's not "popping up" in the overall searches I have done and so I am thinking it must be a newer shino recipe or it's been developed specifically by Mr. Coleman.

#5 smastca

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:33 AM

Try just Malcolm (thanks John) Davis Carbon Trap Shino.
See this link for a recipe and suggestions on how to use it.
http://mudfireclaywo...ry-teacher.html

#6 JBaymore

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 09:41 AM

Try just Michael Davis Carbon Trap Shino.


That's actually MALCOLM Davis, not "Michael". (RIP)

best,

...................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#7 ratmfan105

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 01:06 PM

Hello SAS,

I can't supply a recipe for you but I can provide a bit of clarification on what you might need to be looking for. First, you might be on the right track as far as looking for a glaze similar to the M. Davis Carbon Trap Shino recipe as I think the Leopard Spot shino does indeed have a decent amount of soda ash from what I have heard. With that said, the Geil Kiln workshop is going to show you how the kiln needs to be fired. Specifically, how to reduce and introduce a larger amount of soot into the kiln. During the firing, there are certain times where the temperature rise is much slower as this is the time to "smoke" the kiln. Literally, reducing to the point of smoking pouring out.

I believe the first piece they got the affect of the spotting was on a smaller cup with T.C. Carbon Trap with various flashing of cream, tan, orange, red, followed by black spots and fading halos around each spot. This piece came out of a typical heavy, reduction schedule and it wasn't until recently that Tom found some older articles on smoking the kilns and Paul Geil started tweaking the firing and recipe. I would suggest to attend one of the workshop in Huntington Beach at the Geil factory or at least get in contact with Paul and try and confirm if what I said is around the right track.

Coleman Carbon Trap:

Soda Ash 16
F-4 Soda Feldspar 9
Nepheline Syenite 39
Redart Clay 6
EP Kaolin 17
OM#4 Ball Clay 13
__________________

Hope that helps and if your looking for another interesting is the sharkskin shino from the rare to find book named American Shino.

Best Regards,

Zac H.

#8 SAS Pottery

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 07:22 PM


Try just Michael Davis Carbon Trap Shino.


That's actually MALCOLM Davis, not "Michael". (RIP)

best,

...................john



#9 SAS Pottery

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 08:27 PM

Hello SAS,

I can't supply a recipe for you but I can provide a bit of clarification on what you might need to be looking for. First, you might be on the right track as far as looking for a glaze similar to the M. Davis Carbon Trap Shino recipe as I think the Leopard Spot shino does indeed have a decent amount of soda ash from what I have heard. With that said, the Geil Kiln workshop is going to show you how the kiln needs to be fired. Specifically, how to reduce and introduce a larger amount of soot into the kiln. During the firing, there are certain times where the temperature rise is much slower as this is the time to "smoke" the kiln. Literally, reducing to the point of smoking pouring out.

I believe the first piece they got the affect of the spotting was on a smaller cup with T.C. Carbon Trap with various flashing of cream, tan, orange, red, followed by black spots and fading halos around each spot. This piece came out of a typical heavy, reduction schedule and it wasn't until recently that Tom found some older articles on smoking the kilns and Paul Geil started tweaking the firing and recipe. I would suggest to attend one of the workshop in Huntington Beach at the Geil factory or at least get in contact with Paul and try and confirm if what I said is around the right track.

Coleman Carbon Trap:

Soda Ash 16
F-4 Soda Feldspar 9
Nepheline Syenite 39
Redart Clay 6
EP Kaolin 17
OM#4 Ball Clay 13
__________________

Hope that helps and if your looking for another interesting is the sharkskin shino from the rare to find book named American Shino.

Best Regards,

Zac H.



#10 SAS Pottery

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 08:34 PM

Zac - thanks for the TC recipe - I have the MD recipe from the Dec 2000 CM - because the studio I am a part of is community based, not sure that the firing schedule is realistic for what we do. It would require the kiln to be loaded with shino only work - something the "community" may not want to do or the instructor for that matter. However, I'll try some test tiles on both glazes to see what they do and do a forum reply posting on the results. I am guessing they won't be as dramatic as what either TC or MD have gotten but then nothing ventured, nothing gained - regards back to you - SAS

#11 Kanakanak

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 11:52 AM

Zac - thanks for the TC recipe - I have the MD recipe from the Dec 2000 CM - because the studio I am a part of is community based, not sure that the firing schedule is realistic for what we do. It would require the kiln to be loaded with shino only work - something the "community" may not want to do or the instructor for that matter. However, I'll try some test tiles on both glazes to see what they do and do a forum reply posting on the results. I am guessing they won't be as dramatic as what either TC or MD have gotten but then nothing ventured, nothing gained - regards back to you - SAS



It is not an effect that is accomplished by glaze formula alone. It is also highly dependent on the application and the firing steps. It's rather complex but gives lovely effects when done right. I doubt that it would be a suitable addition to a community studio setting. Far too many variables involved. When done incorrectly, the results can be quite ugly and whole loads of ware can be ruined.

#12 SAS Pottery

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 02:29 PM


Zac - thanks for the TC recipe - I have the MD recipe from the Dec 2000 CM - because the studio I am a part of is community based, not sure that the firing schedule is realistic for what we do. It would require the kiln to be loaded with shino only work - something the "community" may not want to do or the instructor for that matter. However, I'll try some test tiles on both glazes to see what they do and do a forum reply posting on the results. I am guessing they won't be as dramatic as what either TC or MD have gotten but then nothing ventured, nothing gained - regards back to you - SAS



It is not an effect that is accomplished by glaze formula alone. It is also highly dependent on the application and the firing steps. It's rather complex but gives lovely effects when done right. I doubt that it would be a suitable addition to a community studio setting. Far too many variables involved. When done incorrectly, the results can be quite ugly and whole loads of ware can be ruined.



You are probably correct as to the "best" results that can be obtained in the ideal firing setting - however, we do get some nice results with the SF Shino in a combined kiln with other glazed work. As I mentioned above in my last note, I'll mix up a "test" batch, apply it and see if this particular receipe will act in any way like what the "ideal" would look like - thanks for the continued interest in this posting. - SAS

#13 bciskepottery

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 03:34 PM

some ideas to consider . . . http://mudfireclaywo...ry-teacher.html




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