Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Creative ways to get clay out of a 5gal bucket?


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 Ben

Ben

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 136 posts

Posted 02 December 2012 - 12:58 PM

I have a 5gal bucket full of clay. It was trimming scraps full to the top and reslaked. (about 10 years ago) I'd rather not dig it out by the handfull if I can avoid it.
Does anyone have any creative ways to get the clay out of the bucket?
If so, I'd love to hear them.
Thanks,
Ben

#2 florence w

florence w

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 02 December 2012 - 02:41 PM

This won't solve your current problem but when you start your new bucket, line the bucket with an old pillow case. Only fill the bucket part way with clay and water, then pull out the pillow case and enclosed clay. Allow the wet clay still inside the pillow case to drain and dry outside on a warm, breezy summer day elevated off the ground in some way (a dish rack possibly). Next day, turn it over and allow to drain and dry on the other side (the previously down side). Then stomp on the clay to remove the air...or just wedge it...

#3 Ben

Ben

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 136 posts

Posted 02 December 2012 - 02:47 PM

This won't solve your current problem but when you start your new bucket, line the bucket with an old pillow case. Only fill the bucket part way with clay and water, then pull out the pillow case and enclosed clay. Allow the wet clay still inside the pillow case to drain and dry outside on a warm, breezy summer day elevated off the ground in some way (a dish rack possibly). Next day, turn it over and allow to drain and dry on the other side (the previously down side). Then stomp on the clay to remove the air...or just wedge it...


Seems like way back when I did this, I started the next bucket with a thick black trash can liner. Seems like I say since I must have processed that clay and used it. Probably why this bucket got pushed to the side and is still down in the basement.

#4 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,408 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 02 December 2012 - 07:24 PM

I guess this could qualify as creative . . .

Is the clay dry or wet? If dry, could you drop the bucket a few times to loosen it up/crack the mass and then dump it out? If wet, and you don't mind losing the bucket, you could drill a couple of large holes in the bottom and invert the bucket, let gravity do its thing. The holes will help break the seal of the clay and the bucket, or break the vacuum.

#5 Lucille Oka

Lucille Oka

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 756 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 02 December 2012 - 07:30 PM

Since you can lift and invert the container wear rubber gloves, turn the container on its side, on to the wedging table, dig it out with a stick or the large spoon as suggested and wedge it up. Store it in plastic bags ready for throwing.



I edited this post.

John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#6 Nancy S.

Nancy S.

    My day job pays for my clay habit

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 166 posts
  • LocationHarrisburg area, PA

Posted 02 December 2012 - 09:56 PM

I have a 5gal bucket full of clay. It was trimming scraps full to the top and reslaked. (about 10 years ago) I'd rather not dig it out by the handfull if I can avoid it.
Does anyone have any creative ways to get the clay out of the bucket?
If so, I'd love to hear them.
Thanks,
Ben


I don't know if it's considered a "creative" way, but I just use a giant serving/cooking spoon to dish out the slop and get it to the wedging board. When it gets down to the dregs, I go ahead and scrape with my hands or a kitchen spatula, or just throw more water in the bucket to rinse down the sides.

Or do you mean that the clay has all air-dried?

#7 weeble

weeble

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 121 posts
  • LocationOregon Coast

Posted 03 December 2012 - 03:51 AM

Um, unless I'm really in love with the bucket or desperately need the clay.... Hand it off to a student and say 'Get that goop out and you can use it'

Posted Image
Maryjane Carlson

Whistling Fish Pottery

#8 Ben

Ben

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 136 posts

Posted 03 December 2012 - 07:30 AM

The clay is wet and feels a little bit softer than what I use for throwing. Too stiff to be mixed up, not so tiff as to require adding water before wedging.

I'd like to save the bucket but that isn't mandatory.

Whattya think about this?
I was thinking I could make a hole to the bottom of the bucket as a vacuum break vent, then either turn the bucket upside down and bang on the floor or insert the garden hose and pack it in tight, invert and bang on the floor while the water hose applied water pressure to the bottom of the bucket/clay interface.

#9 OffCenter

OffCenter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts

Posted 03 December 2012 - 08:31 AM

I guess this could qualify as creative . . .

Is the clay dry or wet? If dry, could you drop the bucket a few times to loosen it up/crack the mass and then dump it out? If wet, and you don't mind losing the bucket, you could drill a couple of large holes in the bottom and invert the bucket, let gravity do its thing. The holes will help break the seal of the clay and the bucket, or break the vacuum.


I love that video. Thanks for posting it! As for using explosives to get the clay out of the bucket, use a metal rod to push a hole down to the bottom of the bucket then lite and drop 3 M80s down the hole and stand back... way back.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#10 TJR

TJR

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,187 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 03 December 2012 - 10:20 AM

You get the metal handle from another old five gallon bucket. You squeeze the heavy guage wire into more of a "u" or a "d", and then scoop away. As you get down to the bottom, you bonk the bucket on the floor, and more clay will come away from the sides.
TJR[Tom]

#11 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,146 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 03 December 2012 - 11:01 AM

Ben, your question actually made my brain hurt ... thinking of various bags and buckets of mystery clay I have in various hiding spots that I have to dispose of.

Question one is always and ever ... hmmmm, what clay is this?
Question two ... is it good clay or discard from mold making or what??
Question three ... how old is this stuff?
Question four ... what color is it and what cone is it?
Question five ... how much do I care ??
Question six ... how bad does it smell?

Solution ... I store it in hopes I will miraculously remember what it is .... which of course in a couple months ... leads right back to question one.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#12 Mark McCombs

Mark McCombs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 123 posts
  • LocationSW Washington

Posted 03 December 2012 - 12:09 PM

Freeze the entire bucket.
Invert the bucket. (this may be enough)
Pour some warm water on the outside of the bucket.
Remove bucket from clay.
Allow clay to thaw.
Mark
Fast Hawk Pottery


^5-6 Ox
1227 Skutt

#13 ayjay

ayjay

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 279 posts
  • LocationHampshire, UK.

Posted 03 December 2012 - 04:39 PM

It's not very creative, but it's how I do it.

[attachment=1729:gauging trowel.JPG]

#14 perkolator

perkolator

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 287 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 04 December 2012 - 04:39 PM

If you don't care about a $2 5-gal bucket, then why not put a new blade in your utility knife and just cut the bucket off? It's not like a bucket is indestructible Posted Image Seems like the quickest solution IMO. Other than that, I like the idea of flipping over and drilling a small hole - I'd even try putting an air hose up to that hole and see if the air pressure might speed up the delivery. Having done this before with clay at a consistency like you described, I've had success with putting the bucket on it's side, then take a mallet to the walls to make a little gap between clay and plastic all the way around, then flip entirely and it magically comes out since the weight will break it free from the bottom after a slight tap.

#15 smsavta

smsavta

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 06 December 2012 - 12:54 PM

This won't solve your current problem but when you start your new bucket, line the bucket with an old pillow case. Only fill the bucket part way with clay and water, then pull out the pillow case and enclosed clay. Allow the wet clay still inside the pillow case to drain and dry outside on a warm, breezy summer day elevated off the ground in some way (a dish rack possibly). Next day, turn it over and allow to drain and dry on the other side (the previously down side). Then stomp on the clay to remove the air...or just wedge it...




Take that pillow case containing clay and water and dry it out by placing it on plaster bat and rotating it . Works great

#16 smsavta

smsavta

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 06 December 2012 - 12:54 PM

Take that pillow case containing clay and water and dry it out by placing it on plaster bat and rotating it . Works great

#17 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,704 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 06 December 2012 - 03:31 PM

Perkos got it right-cut the bucket off and move on. Buckets are cheap to free. In my 40 years with clay I have never bought a 5 gallon bucket. I have at least 30 of them-painters are looking to get rid of them.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#18 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,885 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 06 December 2012 - 03:50 PM

Perkos got it right-cut the bucket off and move on. Buckets are cheap to free. In my 40 years with clay I have never bought a 5 gallon bucket. I have at least 30 of them-painters are looking to get rid of them.
Mark


Potters from my generation tend to call them "Dunkin Donuts Buckets". That's because the donut fillings for stuff like jelly donuts and Boston Kreme came in white, 5 gallon buckets,... and the stores needed to get rid of them at an alarming rate each week. Free for the taking. Sometimes smelled great ;)src="http://ceramicartsda...ault/wink.gif"> .

Many food service businesses still get stuff like pickles in them and you can still get them for free. Sometime smells bad! B)src="http://ceramicartsda...ault/cool.gif">

best,

.............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#19 SmartsyArtsy

SmartsyArtsy

    Chris Seminara

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 160 posts
  • LocationPNW

Posted 07 December 2012 - 03:24 PM

The exploding clay video is great. I agree with the commentor. When fired, these pieces would make a great installation. Is it Pyroclaynics?

#20 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,556 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 07 December 2012 - 07:42 PM


Perkos got it right-cut the bucket off and move on. Buckets are cheap to free. In my 40 years with clay I have never bought a 5 gallon bucket. I have at least 30 of them-painters are looking to get rid of them.
Mark


Potters from my generation tend to call them "Dunkin Donuts Buckets". That's because the donut fillings for stuff like jelly donuts and Boston Kreme came in white, 5 gallon buckets,... and the stores needed to get rid of them at an alarming rate each week. Free for the taking. Sometimes smelled great ;)src="http://ceramicartsda...efault/wink.gif"> .

Many food service businesses still get stuff like pickles in them and you can still get them for free. Sometime smells bad! B)src="http://ceramicartsda...efault/cool.gif">

best,

.............john


Very true. I worked in a bakery one summer, and those places go through jelly and other such filling in insane quantities.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users